pratchet bookz

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MiKeY

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Dec 10, 2001, 10:17:50 AM12/10/01
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hey what is up

r the pratchet bookz good? my bro says yeh but i dont trust him much
as he iz a lamerrr..... neway i want 2 no 4 sure b4 i read 1....

>>> MiKeY <<<

Richard Bos

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Dec 10, 2001, 10:35:21 AM12/10/01
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mikey1234...@yahoo.com (MiKeY) wrote:

You know what? I suggest you first learn to just read at all, before
trying to read something as hard as a Pratchett book. He's real tough,
you know - he even uses words of four syllables or more! Perhaps "See
Spot run" is more in your league? Then, when you can consistently spell
words of five letters without dropping one or accidentally using a digit
instead, you might want to graduate to something harder, for example
Mother Goose. This way, you will eventually be able to read really
difficult books, like those of Mr. Pratchett. And when that glorious day
comes, we will be glad to tell you all about them, and maybe even
recommend one for you to start with.

Richard

Isabel Kunkle

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Dec 10, 2001, 10:58:07 AM12/10/01
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Richard Bos <in...@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl> wrote in message
news:3c14d4f6...@news.tiscali.nl...

WYMM?


Stevie D

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Dec 10, 2001, 11:43:07 AM12/10/01
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MiKeY scribbled:

> hey what is up
>
> r the pratchet bookz good? my bro says yeh but i dont trust him much
> as he iz a lamerrr..... neway i want 2 no 4 sure b4 i read 1....

You know what? That has to be just about the "lamest" question I've
ever seen asked - look at where you've posted this to - a newsgroup
with "Fan" and "Pratchett" in its title - what do you think we are
going to say about them?!

By the way, the books use words and sentences, not txt msg lngg, so
you might want to brush up on your reading skills before you try,
--
Stevie D
\\\\\ ///// Bringing dating agencies to the
\\\\\\\__X__/////// common hedgehog since 2001 - "HedgeHugs"
___\\\\\\\'/ \'///////_____________________________________________

Richard Bos

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Dec 10, 2001, 12:13:15 PM12/10/01
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"Isabel Kunkle" <isabel...@brown.edu> wrote:

> Richard Bos <in...@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl> wrote in message
> news:3c14d4f6...@news.tiscali.nl...

> > You know what? I suggest you first learn to just read at all, before
> > trying to read something as hard as a Pratchett book. He's real tough,
> > you know - he even uses words of four syllables or more! Perhaps "See
> > Spot run" is more in your league? Then, when you can consistently spell
> > words of five letters without dropping one or accidentally using a digit
> > instead, you might want to graduate to something harder, for example
> > Mother Goose. This way, you will eventually be able to read really
> > difficult books, like those of Mr. Pratchett. And when that glorious day
> > comes, we will be glad to tell you all about them, and maybe even
> > recommend one for you to start with.
>

> WYMM?

For just that? No. Just for that, I am not worth a proposal, not even a
WYMM. Sorry, but one has to have _some_ standards, you know.

Richard

gra...@affordable-leather.co.ukdeletethis

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Dec 10, 2001, 3:48:04 PM12/10/01
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Hi there,

On 10 Dec 2001 07:17:50 -0800, mikey1234...@yahoo.com (MiKeY)
wrote:

I'm sorry, but I think you're trying too hard to troll here.

Let's look at the evidence: we have a yahoo address, posted through
google, written in m0r0N tXt and being clearly inflammatory...

All you missed was an AOL connection.

Cheers,
Graham.

phobos

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Dec 10, 2001, 6:10:18 PM12/10/01
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in...@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) wrote in message news:<3c14d4f6...@news.tiscali.nl>...

Aww, don't be too hard on him... it's his first usenet post. He
probably thinks everyone talks like that here, only having encountered
internet culture before from bad newspaper articles about evil
hackers...

MiKeY

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Dec 10, 2001, 8:24:44 PM12/10/01
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hey i didnt mean 2 offend ne of the ppl on this site with my q. i like
2 read and also write poems. u can read 1 or 2 on my webstie...

www.geocities.com/mikey12345678_uk_2k

>>> MiKeY <<<

in...@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl (Richard Bos) wrote in message news:<3c14d4f6...@news.tiscali.nl>...

Tim Cain

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Dec 10, 2001, 9:28:02 PM12/10/01
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Speaker-to-Customers

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Dec 10, 2001, 10:32:13 PM12/10/01
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"MiKeY" wrote ...

> hey i didnt mean 2 offend ne of the ppl on this site with my q. i like
> 2 read and also write poems. u can read 1 or 2 on my webstie...
>
> www.geocities.com/mikey12345678_uk_2k

Yes, the Pratchett books are good. However the people on this newsgroup
don't like to talk about them.

I would suggest you start with "Only You Can Save Mankind". The central
character is a 14-year-old boy who plays computer games. It was written
several years ago, so we are not talking Quake III ; this is back in ancient
times even before "Tomb Raider". However, you should get the general idea.

If you can cope with that, the sequels "Johnny and the Dead" and "Johnny and
the Bomb" are also good reads for younger teenagers.

I apologise if you are really an adult; but use of "doodz" style
abbreviations and lack of punctuation, in a post to a literary newsgroup,
inevitably gives the impression that you are a 13-year-old with a low
reading age, the social skills of a Tasmanian Devil, and no friends.

Your poetry is passable; about the same standard as Slipknot lyrics. You
have a very long way to go before you reach the level of Limp Bizkit or OPM.
If you read all Terry Pratchett's adult books, and your language skills
improve accordingly, you might reach the level of Sum 41 or Blink 182 by
about 2012.

Paul Speaker-to-Customers
--

"Bother!" said Pooh. "I'm booked for a Celebrity Deathmatch against the
Honey Monster".


StANTo

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Dec 11, 2001, 2:30:40 AM12/11/01
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"MiKeY" <mikey1234...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:508ed5d.01121...@posting.google.com...

> hey i didnt mean 2 offend ne of the ppl on this site with my q. i like
> 2 read and also write poems. u can read 1 or 2 on my webstie...
>

Is there a language converter for those?

^_^


Michel

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Dec 11, 2001, 7:23:47 AM12/11/01
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I distinctly remember Tim Cain saying:
> http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/jargon/jargon.html#Lamer-speak
>
> Tim.

Ahhh, I thought it was rather cute ;-) little boy, a "lame bro" who likes
Pratchett, his first computer with internet, the poetry we all wrote when we
were young [1]. I felt all young again...though I didn't understand most he
wrote anyway...

Michel


[1] Or was it just me...

--
Gouwenees forever :-)

Warwick

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Dec 11, 2001, 8:42:00 AM12/11/01
to
In article <508ed5d.01121...@posting.google.com>,
mikey1234...@yahoo.com says...

> hey i didnt mean 2 offend ne of the ppl on this site with my q. i like
> 2 read and also write poems. u can read 1 or 2 on my webstie...
>
> www.geocities.com/mikey12345678_uk_2k

You know, you probably didn't want to post that URL here.

<fair use>
the first time that i saw ur face
i new my life was a waset
for u were beutiful and i
a wreck of a man who needed 2 die
</ fair use>

I seem to recall a few folk sitting in the late summer counting the
number of spelling mistakes and grammatical errors on a simple beer
bottle.

I shudder to think what they'd do to that page.

Warwick

Adrian Ogden

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Dec 11, 2001, 10:01:05 AM12/11/01
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Warwick <use...@warwick.dnsalias.com> writes:

>In article <508ed5d.01121...@posting.google.com>,
>mikey1234...@yahoo.com says...
>> hey i didnt mean 2 offend ne of the ppl on this site with my q. i like
>> 2 read and also write poems. u can read 1 or 2 on my webstie...
>>
>> www.geocities.com/mikey12345678_uk_2k

>You know, you probably didn't want to post that URL here.

>I seem to recall a few folk sitting in the late summer counting the

>number of spelling mistakes and grammatical errors on a simple beer
>bottle.

>I shudder to think what they'd do to that page.

I shuddered just reading it.

Yet more proof that kids today don't know the difference between kewl
and illiter8.

--
<< Adrian Ogden -- "Sic Biscuitus Disintegrat" -- www.rdg.ac.uk/~sssogadr/ >>

"Nothing is as simple as it looks, except a chicken."

Ingvar Mattsson

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Dec 11, 2001, 10:38:03 AM12/11/01
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Warwick <use...@warwick.dnsalias.com> writes:

[On possible language errors]


> I seem to recall a few folk sitting in the late summer counting the
> number of spelling mistakes and grammatical errors on a simple beer
> bottle.
>
> I shudder to think what they'd do to that page.

I was within a hair's width of taking you up on the challeneg, but I
noticed I left my industrial-strength linguistic chainsaw at home, so
I shall have to give it a miss.

//Ingvar
--
When C++ is your hammer, everything looks like a thumb
Latest seen from Steven M. Haflich, in c.l.l

Charles A Lieberman

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Dec 11, 2001, 12:33:47 PM12/11/01
to
Adrian Ogden 11 Dec 2001 15:01:05 GMT
<9v573h$3mr$1...@vins1.reading.ac.uk>

>Yet more proof that kids today don't know the difference between kewl
>and illiter8

When I first saw the subject line I expected an offer/request for
pirated Korgi and Colin Smyth editions of the books.

--
Charles A. Lieberman | "[A]pproximately 70% of the students at Stuyve-
Brooklyn, NY, USA | sant fit the description of a teenage homicidal
cali...@bigfoot.com | maniac" --letter, NY Post, April 28, 1999
http://calieber.tripod.com/home.html

CCA

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Dec 11, 2001, 12:55:49 PM12/11/01
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MiKeY (>mikey1234...@yahoo.com) wrote

>hey i didnt mean 2 offend ne of the ppl on this site with my q. i like
>2 read and also write poems. u can read 1 or 2 on my webstie...

(snip)

>(Richard Bos) wrote

>(MiKeY) wrote:
>>
>> > hey what is up
>> >
>> > r the pratchet bookz good?

(snip rest)

Text language *and* top-posting????
You really are trying to piss people off, aren't you?
CCA

phobos

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Dec 11, 2001, 1:07:36 PM12/11/01
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ssso...@reading.ac.uk (Adrian Ogden) wrote in message news:<9v573h$3mr$1...@vins1.reading.ac.uk>...

> Warwick <use...@warwick.dnsalias.com> writes:
>
> >In article <508ed5d.01121...@posting.google.com>,
> >mikey1234...@yahoo.com says...
> >> hey i didnt mean 2 offend ne of the ppl on this site with my q. i like
> >> 2 read and also write poems. u can read 1 or 2 on my webstie...
> >>
> >> www.geocities.com/mikey12345678_uk_2k
>
> >You know, you probably didn't want to post that URL here.
>
> >I seem to recall a few folk sitting in the late summer counting the
> >number of spelling mistakes and grammatical errors on a simple beer
> >bottle.
>
> >I shudder to think what they'd do to that page.
>
> I shuddered just reading it.
>
> Yet more proof that kids today don't know the difference between kewl
> and illiter8.

Kids today? Since Google put up the really old USENET archives, I've
been getting first-hand experience of the hitherto mythical B1FF. This
doesn't seem to be anything new :-)

David Ferguson

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Dec 11, 2001, 2:58:27 PM12/11/01
to

"Adrian Ogden" <ssso...@reading.ac.uk> wrote in message
news:9v573h$3mr$1...@vins1.reading.ac.uk...
<snip>

> Yet more proof that kids today don't know the difference
>between kewl and illiter8.
>

Sig! Sig! May I?

David, S!E


David Chapman

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Dec 11, 2001, 4:42:16 AM12/11/01
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"MiKeY" <mikey1234...@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:508ed5d.01121...@posting.google.com...
> hey i didnt mean 2 offend ne of the ppl on this site with my q. i like
> 2 read and also write poems. u can read 1 or 2 on my webstie...

u r ee cummings aicm5ukp.

--
While order does exist in the Universe,
it is not at all what we had in mind.


Adrian Ogden

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Dec 11, 2001, 5:02:33 PM12/11/01
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"David Ferguson" <nos...@dferguson.co.uk> writes:

>Sig! Sig! May I?

You may, you may...

:-)


--
<< Adrian Ogden -- "Sic Biscuitus Disintegrat" -- www.rdg.ac.uk/~sssogadr/ >>

"Get thee behind me, thou evil side-order of Lucifer!"

Illaparatzo-sama

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Dec 11, 2001, 8:44:00 PM12/11/01
to
I'm young, and I'm afraid I can't remember writing any poetry that resembles
that...


Richard Bos

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Dec 12, 2001, 3:43:48 AM12/12/01
to
ssso...@reading.ac.uk (Adrian Ogden) wrote:

> Yet more proof that kids today don't know the difference between kewl
> and illiter8.

There _is_ no difference between kewl and illiterate. You have to be
dense as Administratium to qualify for kewl. Being able to write
correctly means immediate disqualification.

Richard

Gurpreet Singh

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Dec 12, 2001, 1:53:40 PM12/12/01
to

"Richard Bos" <in...@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl> wrote in message
news:3c170bd7...@news.tiscali.nl...

I object - I'm a kid today and I certainly know the difference between kewl
and illiterate. For example: PTerry is kewl - and I don't thinks he's
illiterate.
I hate it when people use the term "Kids today" I don't want to be grouped
alongside many other kids (Mikey being an example [1]) but because I am
below the age of 16, I am considered to be similar to him.


1- this is purely using evidence I have seen from your posts to this
newsgroup, and from your website.


Melody S-K

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Dec 12, 2001, 1:52:32 PM12/12/01
to

"Gurpreet Singh" <Gurpree...@ukgateway.net> wrote in
message news:3c17a7aa$0$8509$cc9e...@news.dial.pipex.com...

SNippage

> I hate it when people use the term "Kids today" I don't
want to be grouped
> alongside many other kids (Mikey being an example [1]) but
because I am
> below the age of 16, I am considered to be similar to him.

Tough!

I was grouped in the *kids today* in 1970 when I was 15 , so
you can just
put up and shut up :)

Melody

--
Hey, if you cut off your foot, you wouldn't keep putting it
in your mouth, but your body wouldn't be the same, would it?

Gurpreet Singh

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Dec 12, 2001, 2:05:50 PM12/12/01
to

"Melody S-K" <Mel...@Wibble.org> wrote in message
news:9v89ai$df5pk$1...@ID-6544.news.dfncis.de...

>
>
> "Gurpreet Singh" <Gurpree...@ukgateway.net>
> wrote in
> message news:3c17a7aa$0
> $8509>$cc9e...@news.dial.pipex.com...
>
> SNippage
>
> > I hate it when people use the term "Kids today" I don't
> > want to be grouped
> > alongside many other kids (Mikey being an example [1]) > >but
> > because I am
> > below the age of 16, I am considered to be similar to
> > him.
>
> Tough!
>
> I was grouped in the *kids today* in 1970 when I was
> 15 , so
> you can just
> put up and shut up :)
>


And did you enjoy it? I take it from the form of your post that you didn't
enjoy it. Just because you suffered doesn't mean that I have to suffer as
well.....

I hate it when 'old people' take out the woes of their childhood on 'kids
today'...


Stevie D

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Dec 12, 2001, 3:20:59 PM12/12/01
to
Gurpreet Singh wrote:

> I object - I'm a kid today and I certainly know the difference between kewl
> and illiterate. For example: PTerry is kewl - and I don't thinks he's
> illiterate.

Bzzzt! You don't!

"Kewl" is not, *not*, _NOT_ the same as "cool". Kewl describes the
sort of person who thinks it is fun to write in "31!73 5ş3@<" (or
'elite speak', for those people having difficulty translating it. The
sort of people who, when confronted with another human being, will
ignore it if at all possible,

> I hate it when people use the term "Kids today" I don't want to be
> grouped alongside many other kids (Mikey being an example [1]) but
> because I am below the age of 16, I am considered to be similar to him.

Point taken. I suppose it mildly ironic that I find myself denouncing
the younger generations, which age 22 I am pretty sure includes
myself!

Melody S-K

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Dec 12, 2001, 4:33:32 PM12/12/01
to

"Gurpreet Singh" <Gurpree...@ukgateway.net> wrote in

message news:3c17aa88$0$234$cc9e...@news.dial.pipex.com...


"Melody S-K" <Mel...@Wibble.org> wrote in message
> news:9v89ai$df5pk$1...@ID-6544.news.dfncis.de...
"Gurpreet Singh" <Gurpree...@ukgateway.net>

> And did you enjoy it? I take it from the form of your post


that you didn't
> enjoy it. Just because you suffered doesn't mean that I
have to suffer as
> well.....
>
> I hate it when 'old people' take out the woes of their
childhood on 'kids
> today'...

Oh dear ...missed the smiley did you? It was meant in a
humerous way.
Never mind , maybe a sense of humour will develop by the
time you
are as old as me :)

Aquarion

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Dec 12, 2001, 4:58:48 PM12/12/01
to
On Wed, 12 Dec 2001, Stevie D <Stevie> put forth:

> Gurpreet Singh wrote:
>
>> I object - I'm a kid today and I certainly know the difference between kewl
>> and illiterate. For example: PTerry is kewl - and I don't thinks he's
>> illiterate.
>
> Bzzzt! You don't!
>
> "Kewl" is not, *not*, _NOT_ the same as "cool". Kewl describes the
> sort of person who thinks it is fun to write in "31!73 5ş3@<"

Bzzzt! Not true!

Writing in 3|!73 5?3@|< can be fun.

It's those who *only* write in 'leet, and/or think it's kewl[1] to do
so who need to be avoided.

Yours in total sincerity
Aquarion

[1] Kewl's Excessivly Wonderful Links, part of the engine that drives
Aquarionics.com, along with Klide and Klind. And Albatross.

Eric Jarvis

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Dec 12, 2001, 6:33:37 PM12/12/01
to
Stevie D wrote:
>
> Point taken. I suppose it mildly ironic that I find myself denouncing
> the younger generations, which age 22 I am pretty sure includes
> myself!
>

damn right young feller me lad

<mode="acting my age">

you young people, quite extraordinary

</mode>

--
eric - afprelationships in headers
"money can't buy you love, but sometimes dinner
is much more important"

Gid Holyoake

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Dec 12, 2001, 7:58:18 PM12/12/01
to
In article <9v8io6$du2gr$1...@ID-6544.news.dfncis.de>, Melody S-K
generously decided to share with us..

Snippetry..

> Never mind , maybe a sense of humour will develop by the
> time you are as old as me :)

Hmmm.. is it possible for *anyone* to be as old as you dear?..

Gid

Harsh Sukthankar

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Dec 12, 2001, 7:58:56 PM12/12/01
to

hEY dunt mock illetericizm, man

I believe Mikey is a shining example to the rest of us teens. I am also in a
state of delirium. The two are in direct correlation.

Snip

Gid Holyoake

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Dec 12, 2001, 8:13:38 PM12/12/01
to
In article <k3TR7.36998$pa1.13...@news3.rdc1.on.home.com>, Harsh
Sukthankar generously decided to share with us..

Snippetry..

> I believe Mikey is a shining example to the rest of us teens. I am also in a


> state of delirium. The two are in direct correlation.

You're also posting from home.com.. learn, teen, or find oblivion..

Gid

Harsh Sukthankar

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Dec 12, 2001, 9:16:04 PM12/12/01
to

"Gid Holyoake" <newsm...@brynamman.org.uk> spake

That's the last time home.com has shamed me. Can anyone tell me (if its
possible), how to remove that "Organization" thing from a message? The one
that appears in mine is virtually an advertisement.


Andrew Gray

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Dec 12, 2001, 9:36:08 PM12/12/01
to
On Thu, 13 Dec 2001 02:16:04 GMT, "Harsh Sukthankar"
<hjsukt...@hotmail.com> wrote:

> > You're also posting from home.com.. learn, teen, or find oblivion..
> >
> > Gid
>
> That's the last time home.com has shamed me. Can anyone tell me (if its
> possible), how to remove that "Organization" thing from a message? The one
> that appears in mine is virtually an advertisement.

tools -> accounts -> [account name] -> properties... bingo

Or at least on this machine ;-)

BTW, it's not just the Organisation line that 'shamed you'...

Harsh Sukthankar

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Dec 12, 2001, 9:43:25 PM12/12/01
to

"Andrew Gray" <shim...@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
news:3c181353...@news.cableinet.co.uk...
Snipping

>
>
> tools -> accounts -> [account name] -> properties... bingo

I've tried it before, didn't seem to work. I'll post this again, and check.

>
> Or at least on this machine ;-)
>
> BTW, it's not just the Organisation line that 'shamed you'...

What else, then?


Harsh Sukthankar

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Dec 12, 2001, 9:44:18 PM12/12/01
to
Worked this time. Must've done something wrong before; thanks for the help.


Julia Jones

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Dec 12, 2001, 9:48:44 PM12/12/01
to
In article <EbUR7.37486$pa1.13...@news3.rdc1.on.home.com>, Harsh
Sukthankar <hjsukt...@hotmail.com> writes

>That's the last time home.com has shamed me. Can anyone tell me (if its
>possible), how to remove that "Organization" thing from a message? The one
>that appears in mine is virtually an advertisement.

One of the OE experts can help you with the latter. However, you're
going to have to try a bit harder to hide the shame. From the headers in
your post:

Path:
uni-berlin.de!fu-berlin.de!cpk-news-hub1.bbnplanet.com!news.gtei.net!news
hub2.home.com!news.home.com!news3.rdc1.on.home.com.POSTED!not-for-mail

Message-ID: <EbUR7.37486$pa1.13...@news3.rdc1.on.home.com>

NNTP-Posting-Host: 24.100.36.44

X-Complaints-To: ab...@home.net

X-Trace: news3.rdc1.on.home.com 1008209764 24.100.36.44 (Wed, 12 Dec
2001 18:16:04 PST)

Ok, so the NNTP-Posting-Host doesn't actually shout it from the
rooftops, but a hotmail address still isn't that much of a fig leaf:-)
--
Julia Jones
Redemption 03, 21-23 February 2003, Ashford, Kent
Celebrating 25 years of Blake's 7 and 10 years of Babylon 5
http://www.smof.com/redemption

flesh_eating_dragon

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Dec 12, 2001, 11:22:08 PM12/12/01
to
Stevie D wrote:

> "Kewl" is not, *not*, _NOT_ the same as "cool". Kewl describes the
> sort of person who thinks it is fun to write in "31!73 5ş3@<" (or

People exist, at least within certain ages, who are relatively sane
but use 'kewl' as a matter of minor eccentricity. If it's not used
obsessively there's no cause for prejudice IM[0<H<(1/0)]O.

Adrian.

Melody S-K

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Dec 13, 2001, 2:58:29 AM12/13/01
to

"Gid Holyoake" <postm...@brynamman.org.uk> wrote in
message
news:MPG.168209528...@nntp.netcomuk.co.uk...

Prolly not :)

Suzi

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Dec 13, 2001, 4:04:48 AM12/13/01
to
Melody S-K <Mel...@Wibble.org> wrote in message
news:9v8io6$du2gr$1...@ID-6544.news.dfncis.de...

>
> "Gurpreet Singh" <Gurpree...@ukgateway.net> wrote in
> message news:3c17aa88$0$234$cc9e...@news.dial.pipex.com...
>
[Snip]

> > I hate it when 'old people' take out the woes of their
> > childhood on 'kids today'...
>
> Oh dear ...missed the smiley did you? It was meant in a
> humerous way.
> Never mind , maybe a sense of humour will develop by the
> time you are as old as me :)

It's OK Melody... it's obviously all that jealousy the youngsters have
because they know we had better childhoods than them :-)

Suzi


Melody S-K

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Dec 13, 2001, 5:05:55 AM12/13/01
to

"Suzi" <Bra...@mothernature.co.uk> wrote in message
news:9v9ret$2h3$1...@lyonesse.netcom.net.uk...

Hehe , childhood in the 60s can't be bad really ..can it ?

Chris Share

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Dec 13, 2001, 5:25:00 AM12/13/01
to
On Thu, 13 Dec 2001 02:44:18 GMT, Harsh Sukthankar
(hjsukt...@hotmail.com) said...

>Worked this time. Must've done something wrong before; thanks for the help.

Ah, only 3 references to home.com in the headers now... the only way to
entirely remove them is use another newsfeed.

HTH, HAND

chris

Warwick

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Dec 13, 2001, 8:30:55 AM12/13/01
to
In article <RrTssTPM...@jajones.demon.co.uk>,
jajon...@nospam.demon.co.uk says...

> In article <EbUR7.37486$pa1.13...@news3.rdc1.on.home.com>, Harsh
> Sukthankar <hjsukt...@hotmail.com> writes
> >That's the last time home.com has shamed me. Can anyone tell me (if its
> >possible), how to remove that "Organization" thing from a message? The one
> >that appears in mine is virtually an advertisement.
>
> One of the OE experts can help you with the latter. However, you're
> going to have to try a bit harder to hide the shame. From the headers in
> your post:
>
> Path:
> uni-berlin.de!fu-berlin.de!cpk-news-hub1.bbnplanet.com!news.gtei.net!news
> hub2.home.com!news.home.com!news3.rdc1.on.home.com.POSTED!not-for-mail
>
> Message-ID: <EbUR7.37486$pa1.13...@news3.rdc1.on.home.com>
>
> NNTP-Posting-Host: 24.100.36.44
>
> X-Complaints-To: ab...@home.net
>
> X-Trace: news3.rdc1.on.home.com 1008209764 24.100.36.44 (Wed, 12 Dec
> 2001 18:16:04 PST)
>
> Ok, so the NNTP-Posting-Host doesn't actually shout it from the
> rooftops, but a hotmail address still isn't that much of a fig leaf:-)


Actually the references to home.com may just expire all on their own
shortly.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/archive/21943.html

Warwick

Mary Messall

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Dec 13, 2001, 3:16:26 AM12/13/01
to
Melody S-K wrote:
> Hehe , childhood in the 60s can't be bad really ..can it ?
> :)

I know better than that. I watched "The Wonder Years."

-Mary

--
{I drank at every vine. / The last was like the first. / I came upon
no wine / So wonderful as thirst.} {"Heaven bless the babe!" they said
"What queer books she must have read!"} -two by Edna St Vincent Millay
http://indagabo.orcon.net.nz --> my soapbox and grandstand and gallery

Melody S-K

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Dec 13, 2001, 9:19:41 AM12/13/01
to

"Mary Messall" <m.k.m...@durham.ac.uk> wrote in message
news:3C1863DA...@durham.ac.uk...


> Melody S-K wrote:
> > Hehe , childhood in the 60s can't be bad really ..can it
?
> > :)
>
> I know better than that. I watched "The Wonder Years."

ooooh nooo Mary ..*that* was Merkian 60's , a completely
different kettle of fish to what I had , which was a mixture
or Ukian and Germanic 60's

Alison Murray

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Dec 13, 2001, 10:10:53 AM12/13/01
to
On Thu, 13 Dec 2001 14:19:41 -0000, "Melody S-K" <Mel...@Wibble.org>
wrote:

>
>
>"Mary Messall" <m.k.m...@durham.ac.uk> wrote in message
>news:3C1863DA...@durham.ac.uk...
>> Melody S-K wrote:
>> > Hehe , childhood in the 60s can't be bad really ..can it
>?
>> > :)
>>
>> I know better than that. I watched "The Wonder Years."
>
>ooooh nooo Mary ..*that* was Merkian 60's , a completely
>different kettle of fish to what I had , which was a mixture
>or Ukian and Germanic 60's
>
>:)

Hey! Merkian 60's weren't all that bad - I was there, and I *think* I
remember.

Ali ;-) (Whoops, guess I've delurked...)


Arwen Lune

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Dec 13, 2001, 4:38:54 PM12/13/01
to
Via mysterious ways, a message from Gurpreet Singh reached me on
Thu, 13 Dec 2001 20:37:25 -0000. This is what it read:

> I can see that this is a big issue with you. Does it really
> matter that much?

To me, as second-language speaker, it does.

> Is there a real problem with it?

Yes. Letters and numbers have a different sound in my native
language. While I have been close to native-speaker level in
English, I find it very hard to say the abc in English. Somehow I
just default to my native language.

So what happens is that all these uses of 'handy' numbers in words
completely throw me off - the way I read the letters, the words
make absolutely no sense.

'want 2 no 4 sure b4'

'want twee no vier sure bevier'

It just gives me one hell of a headache. Which is exactly why I ask
people (once) not to do it, and if they persist, I prompty
killfile/downscore//ignore them.

Explanation enough?

Darth Arwen
--
))))) |"the ability to type does not make one intelligent"
)))))))__. |
_))))))))'/ |Training Jedi Hedgehogs since 2001
Ar...@cuteandfluffy.co.uk - http://www.cuteandfluffy.co.uk

Carrie Cota

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Dec 13, 2001, 11:29:01 AM12/13/01
to
On Thu, 13 Dec 2001 08:16:26 +0000, Mary Messall
<m.k.m...@durham.ac.uk>
>Melody S-K wrote:
>> Hehe , childhood in the 60s can't be bad really ..can it ?
>> :)
>
>I know better than that. I watched "The Wonder Years."
>
I have heard it said (upon numerous occasions): "If you can remember
the 60's, you weren't there." I am of a certain age, myself. I was a
child of the "Beat" Era. (Pre-Hippie proto-Goths with better poetry).

Carrie
--


"I look from the wings at the play you are staging/while my guitar gently weeps
While I'm sitting here do nothing but aging./Still my guitar getnly weeps. -George Harrison RIP

Richard Bos

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Dec 13, 2001, 11:55:28 AM12/13/01
to
"Gurpreet Singh" <Gurpree...@ukgateway.net> wrote:

> "Richard Bos" <in...@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl> wrote in message
> news:3c170bd7...@news.tiscali.nl...
> > ssso...@reading.ac.uk (Adrian Ogden) wrote:
> >
> > > Yet more proof that kids today don't know the
> > > difference between kewl
> > > and illiter8.
> >
> > There _is_ no difference between kewl and illiterate. You have to be
> > dense as Administratium to qualify for kewl. Being able to write
> > correctly means immediate disqualification.


>
> I object - I'm a kid today

And yesterday you were a piglet?

Anyway, I never said a word about children, except to indicate that the
braindeadness in question isn't limited to them.

> For example: PTerry is kewl

Wrong. PTerry can spell. At the very most, he could be called "cool",
but that, too, depends on how high he's set his heating.

> - and I don't thinks he's illiterate.

Certainly not. For one thing, he knows the difference between "kewl",
"cool", and "an interesting person".

> I hate it when people use the term "Kids today" I don't want to be grouped
> alongside many other kids (Mikey being an example [1]) but because I am
> below the age of 16, I am considered to be similar to him.

Excuse me, but if you seriously think "kewl" is an epithet anyone but a
script-kiddie deserves, you _are_ similar to him in that respect.

"Kewl" misspellings aren't impressive. They aren't cute. They don't mark
one as a person with intelligence, style, and panache. All they do is
show that the writer couldn't be bothered to pay attention when the
teacher explained spelling, and hasn't acquired the necessary knowledge
in the mean time, either.

Richard

Sandriana

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Dec 13, 2001, 12:03:46 PM12/13/01
to
On Thu, 13 Dec 2001 14:19:41 -0000, "Melody S-K" <Mel...@Wibble.org>
wrote:

>
>


>"Mary Messall" <m.k.m...@durham.ac.uk> wrote in message
>news:3C1863DA...@durham.ac.uk...
>> Melody S-K wrote:
>> > Hehe , childhood in the 60s can't be bad really ..can it
>?
>> > :)
>>
>> I know better than that. I watched "The Wonder Years."
>
>ooooh nooo Mary ..*that* was Merkian 60's , a completely
>different kettle of fish to what I had , which was a mixture
>or Ukian and Germanic 60's

Oh god yes, the interminable dreary Sunday afternoons [1] followed by a
salad tea with limp lettuce, one tomato quarter, pickled beetroot and a
boiled egg ; the inability to find any shops open on a Wednesday;
hand-knitted cardigans; no central heating; going into summer clothes at
Easter (often in freezing March); walking to school in the dark;
'Semprini's Serenade' on the radio; no daytime TV except the
testcard..... do you want any more or I have I made you shudder enough?

[1] Did anyone else and their siblings have fits of hysterics at Sunday
teatime? Or were we just weird?
--

Sandriana
Harvest Specials: Chicken 'n' Cheese Krispy Dippers
(yes,ch-e-e-e-se!),Pork-Style Chicken Tikka Masala
(Give us some more, Mum!), Turkey-Flavoured Yoghurt
(Kids 'gobble' it up!),

Eric Jarvis

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Dec 13, 2001, 12:08:16 PM12/13/01
to
In article <3c1dde05...@news.cis.dfn.de>, sand...@eurobell.co.uk
says...

>
> [1] Did anyone else and their siblings have fits of hysterics at Sunday
> teatime? Or were we just weird?
>

yes

and

yes

--
eric
"if at first you don't succeed,
then try again with it switched on"

Ekuab

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Dec 13, 2001, 12:50:37 PM12/13/01
to

Illaparatzo-sama <ICP...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ADyR7.4038$5K4.4...@newsread1.prod.itd.earthlink.net...
> I'm young, and I'm afraid I can't remember writing any poetry that
resembles
> that... ^^^^^^
>

I would be glad not to... :-)


Melody S-K

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Dec 13, 2001, 12:51:14 PM12/13/01
to

"Sandriana" <sand...@eurobell.co.uk> wrote in message
news:3c1dde05...@news.cis.dfn.de...

Snippage re 60s in Yukkia

> Oh god yes, the interminable dreary Sunday afternoons [1]
followed by a
> salad tea with limp lettuce, one tomato quarter, pickled
beetroot and a
> boiled egg ; the inability to find any shops open on a
Wednesday;
> hand-knitted cardigans; no central heating; going into
summer clothes at
> Easter (often in freezing March); walking to school in the
dark;
> 'Semprini's Serenade' on the radio; no daytime TV except
the
> testcard..... do you want any more or I have I made you
shudder enough?

3 words

Sing something Simple

Another 2

Forces Favourites

nuff said

Julia Jones

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Dec 13, 2001, 2:40:53 PM12/13/01
to
In article <3c18ad95$1...@warwick.dnsalias.com>, Warwick
<War...@warwick.dnsalias.com> writes

>Actually the references to home.com may just expire all on their own
>shortly.
>
>http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/archive/21943.html

I had wondered about that myself - I was aware of excite@home addresses
having a little difficulty, because when several of us got snowed in
that weekend, it led to some difficulty in sending out the "We're snowed
in, see you on Monday afternoon at the earliest" to assorted line
managers.

Gurpreet Singh

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Dec 13, 2001, 3:37:25 PM12/13/01
to

"Richard Bos" <in...@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl> wrote in message
news:3c18bc14...@news.tiscali.nl...

<Snip>

>
> "Kewl" misspellings aren't impressive. They aren't cute. They don't mark
> one as a person with intelligence, style, and panache. All they do is
> show that the writer couldn't be bothered to pay attention when the
> teacher explained spelling, and hasn't acquired the necessary knowledge
> in the mean time, either.
>
> Richard

I can see that this is a big issue with you. Does it really matter that
much? It is surely just the "Fashion" of the time - it will not hark an age
of illiteracy, or a new language (as reported by some newspapers) [1]
It doesn't show that people don't know how to spell, they have to know the
basic spellings of works simply to use "Kewl".

Is there a real problem with it? Even if you don't use it, other people do.
I know many very intelligent people who use "Kewl" while text messaging, and
I have not found one of them who tries to write poems in it (as Mikey did)

I'm sure every generation had some fad.


1 Although, admittedly not by you.


Harsh Sukthankar

unread,
Dec 13, 2001, 3:55:40 PM12/13/01
to
<Snip>

">
> Ok, so the NNTP-Posting-Host doesn't actually shout it from the
> rooftops, but a hotmail address still isn't that much of a fig leaf:-)
> --

I'll go bury my head in sand now...


Bj

unread,
Dec 13, 2001, 5:34:01 PM12/13/01
to
"Arwen Lune" <ar...@meanandevil.co.uk> wrote in message
news:MPG.16833e473...@news.cis.dfn.de...

> Letters and numbers have a different sound in my native
> language. While I have been close to native-speaker level in
> English, I find it very hard to say the abc in English. Somehow I
> just default to my native language.
>
> So what happens is that all these uses of 'handy' numbers in words
> completely throw me off - the way I read the letters, the words
> make absolutely no sense.

g1 problem :-)

Bj


Bj

unread,
Dec 13, 2001, 5:34:01 PM12/13/01
to
"Arwen Lune" <ar...@meanandevil.co.uk> wrote in message
news:MPG.16833e473...@news.cis.dfn.de...

> Letters and numbers have a different sound in my native


> language. While I have been close to native-speaker level in
> English, I find it very hard to say the abc in English. Somehow I
> just default to my native language.
>
> So what happens is that all these uses of 'handy' numbers in words
> completely throw me off - the way I read the letters, the words
> make absolutely no sense.

g1 problem :-)

Bj


Stevie D

unread,
Dec 13, 2001, 6:41:27 PM12/13/01
to
Gurpreet Singh wrote:

> Is there a real problem with it? Even if you don't use it, other people do.
> I know many very intelligent people who use "Kewl" while text messaging, and
> I have not found one of them who tries to write poems in it (as Mikey did)

The thing is that text messaging, like telegrams in days gone by, are
very limited in what you can say (obAFP, King Verence II sending a
clacks). But you didn't find people in the early part of this century
writing everything in telegram shorthand.

Writing in "kewl" on pretty much any medium other than a txt msg shows
supreme arrogance and a total lack of consideration for other people.

It takes no longer to write words out properly than it does to mangle
them into hacker-speak, but it takes a lot longer to read them. I will
skip straight past any message written in "kewl", and once I've been
doing that for a couple of days, it's in the bin that person goes.
--
Stevie D
\\\\\ ///// Bringing dating agencies to the
\\\\\\\__X__/////// common hedgehog since 2001 - "HedgeHugs"
___\\\\\\\'/ \'///////_____________________________________________

Adrian Ogden

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Dec 13, 2001, 10:35:54 PM12/13/01
to
"Gurpreet Singh" <Gurpree...@ukgateway.net> writes:


>"Richard Bos" <in...@hoekstra-uitgeverij.nl> wrote in message
>news:3c18bc14...@news.tiscali.nl...

><Snip>

>>
>> "Kewl" misspellings aren't impressive. They aren't cute. They don't mark
>> one as a person with intelligence, style, and panache. All they do is
>> show that the writer couldn't be bothered to pay attention when the
>> teacher explained spelling, and hasn't acquired the necessary knowledge
>> in the mean time, either.
>>
>> Richard

>I can see that this is a big issue with you. Does it really matter that
>much? It is surely just the "Fashion" of the time - it will not hark an age
>of illiteracy, or a new language (as reported by some newspapers) [1]
>It doesn't show that people don't know how to spell, they have to know the
>basic spellings of works simply to use "Kewl".

No they don't, and therein lies the problem, and the reason for my "can't
tell the difference between kewl and illiter8" comment. Whilst the initial
constructors of - for want of a better word - "kewlisms" need to know the
correct spellings, once they're accepted the way becomes open for those who
come after them to learn the kewlisms alone.

Once the former group gets the lame idea that this is a way to set
themselves apart from the herd, to make themselves kewler-than-thou, then
the latter group will follow their example. In making that their normal
form of communication they reduce their contact with the regular spelling,
with the norms of grammar, and of course with the many words for which
kewlisms don't exist because there's little call for them in text messaging.
Eventually they become unable to read normal english through simple lack
of practice.

This may sound farfetched, but Mikey's poetry page suggests that it's not
that great an exaggeration. Reading gives one a grounding in the language.
How much reading has Mikey done in order to write like that? Even scarier,
in order to write like that in the hope of impressing his girlfriend, and
to put it on the web in the belief that it will impress *anyone*? How much
reading have his friends done in order that he might actually be right?

>Is there a real problem with it? Even if you don't use it, other people do.
>I know many very intelligent people who use "Kewl" while text messaging,

The point of this stuff in text messages is - or was - to reduce typing &
bandwidth by abbreviating. It's ironic that "kewl" doesn't even do that,
it's got the same number of letters.

--
<< Adrian Ogden -- "Sic Biscuitus Disintegrat" -- www.rdg.ac.uk/~sssogadr/ >>

"There is no such word as 'impossible' in my dictionary. In fact,
everything between 'herring' and 'marmalade' appears to be missing."

Andrew Gray

unread,
Dec 14, 2001, 2:26:04 AM12/14/01
to
On Thu, 13 Dec 2001 23:41:27 +0000, Stevie D
<stevieiny...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

> Gurpreet Singh wrote:
>
> > Is there a real problem with it? Even if you don't use it, other people do.
> > I know many very intelligent people who use "Kewl" while text messaging, and
> > I have not found one of them who tries to write poems in it (as Mikey did)
>
> The thing is that text messaging, like telegrams in days gone by, are
> very limited in what you can say (obAFP, King Verence II sending a
> clacks). But you didn't find people in the early part of this century
> writing everything in telegram shorthand.

It's what, 160 characters? 180? I've never run out of space in one,
and that's with less shorthand than I use here...

momo

unread,
Dec 14, 2001, 3:12:17 AM12/14/01
to
Arwen Lune <ar...@meanandevil.co.uk> wrote in message news:<MPG.16833e473...@news.cis.dfn.de>...
> Via mysterious ways, a message from Gurpreet Singh reached me on
> Thu, 13 Dec 2001 20:37:25 -0000. This is what it read:
>
<massive snips>

>
> It just gives me one hell of a headache. Which is exactly why I ask
> people (once) not to do it, and if they persist, I prompty
> killfile/downscore//ignore them.
>
> Explanation enough?
>

That's one of them.... metafforical questions, isn't it? :-)
Anway, I'm one of those who would fall under the categorie of 'kids
today' and have the sincerity to say that I'm not quite that bad.
They would sternly have pointed to the door, if I had applied for
an exchange year in Japan with the same grasp of written language,
as Mikey displayed in his posts. I wonder, after the
first onslaught, how he had the courage to actually post *again*,
seeing that this is a groups full of literate people. It was a
pleasure to survey how one person can make an entire group surround
him like vultures, starting not to attack only him with all the vim and
vigour they can muster, but also the state of the 'new generation'
in general;-)

The scary thing is, you were probably right most of the time.

I think sometimes it depends on the situation, though. Posting a
message containing more numbers than words on afp is the equivalent
of virtual suicide. But some friends of mine, senior in age, make
use of incrypted spelling like that quite frequently. Probably because
they think any words with more than five letters are a torture for
me to read. Or maybe they are just lazy. But anyone spelling like that
hoping to impress or even seem 'kewl' was bound to hit dirt here.
That wasn't being lazy, that was just downright stupidity:-)


>> I can see that this is a big issue with you. Does it really
>> matter that much?

>To me, as second-language speaker, it does.

I second that, i.e. I wouldn't mind a translations of Mr. Chapmans post:-)

All the best,
Momo (- who should know the risks of posting when running a very
high temperature, but just couldn't resist this one. I will bear
all that will follow this post with the air of a martyr... be warned:)

Suzi

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Dec 14, 2001, 4:18:37 AM12/14/01
to
Sandriana <sand...@eurobell.co.uk> wrote in message
news:3c1dde05...@news.cis.dfn.de...
[Snip]
[Re: "The 60's]
> Oh god yes, the interminable dreary Sunday afternoons followed by a

> salad tea with limp lettuce, one tomato quarter, pickled beetroot and
> a boiled egg ;

Nope - never did that... Sunday lunch (Meat, veg and trimmings) was
always about 2 or 3 pm, and then we'd play all afternoon (I was young in
the 60's... only around 7 when we left it and entered the "Hippy Paisley
days" of "The 70's") :-)

> the inability to find any shops open on a Wednesday;

Thursday round our way <g>

> hand-knitted cardigans;

What's wrong with hand-knitted cardigans?... the best ones I've ever had
have been hand-knitted

> no central heating;

Now that I remember vividly - taking undergarments to the bedroom at
night so that you can pull them into the spot in the bed where you were
lying to warm them up for putting on the next morning... the dash to
the sitting room to try and get the fire going so you didn't freeze half
to death :-)

> going into summer clothes at
> Easter (often in freezing March); walking to school in the dark;
> 'Semprini's Serenade' on the radio; no daytime TV except the
> testcard.....

I quite liked some of the colour testcards (the ones which were actually
short movies on the BBC anyway) which arrived at the back end of the
60's... there was the one with the garage, and I remember one with an
owl (it may've been the same one).

> do you want any more or I have I made you shudder enough?

To make you shudder even more... I had a "hip & trendy" mum who wore
mini-skirts in the late 60's... and dressed me to match <G>

Suzi
(who's going to start on the 70's now? Do you remember those straight
dresses that everyone wore... the ones with a zip most of the way up the
front?)


Andy Davison

unread,
Dec 14, 2001, 6:33:23 AM12/14/01