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Terry Pratchett

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Sep 17, 1993, 4:29:47 PM9/17/93
to
The bouncing mail saga:

I _think_ the mail bouncing is over -- at least, it seems so from the
vast increase in mail over the last 36 hours.

This may be because I finally went in and prodded the Alias file and made
sure that mail is re-routed to terryp.

No-one seems to know why mail to tpratchett has started bouncing. As far as I
can see, mail started re-routing to terryp at the end of April. I didn't
notice because, what the hell, I was getting mail. Then for some reason,
probably a few weeks ago, that stopped happening. All this took place
without me tinkering with alias files.

News of future bounces would be welcomed. Right now Experts Are Baffled. But
one way or other, come rain, snow or glom of nit, the mail is getting through.

Terry

Eric A. Seiden

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Sep 19, 1993, 8:13:08 AM9/19/93
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tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett) writes:

>News of future bounces would be welcomed. Right now Experts Are Baffled. But
>one way or other, come rain, snow or glom of nit, the mail is getting through.
>


EXPERTS are _always_ baffled. Let the record show.


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UserName: Eric A. Seiden (DAR Systems International: Miami, FL, USA)
ProLine : darsys@Pro-Entropy [Call Pro-Entropy at 305-265-9073]
Internet: dar...@Pro-Entropy.cts.com [24 hours a day of chaos at 14.4K]
"Imagine there's no heaven; it's easy if you try." -- John Lennon

Terry Pratchett

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Sep 18, 1993, 7:28:15 PM9/18/93
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Maurizio Codogno

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Sep 21, 1993, 3:19:56 AM9/21/93
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In article <748394...@unseen.demon.co.uk> tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk writes:
>


The first sign of Terry wanting to divorce from his newsgroup? :-(
--
ciao! .mau.
-----
Maurizio Codogno - CSELT UF/DU dept. - Torino Italy
"home" email: m...@beatles.cselt.stet.it

Matthew Seaman

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Sep 21, 1993, 3:53:44 AM9/21/93
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In article <748394...@unseen.demon.co.uk> tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett) writes:

Pterry> Newsgroups: alt.fan.pratchett
Pterry> From: tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett)
Pterry> Distribution: world
Pterry> Organization: Disorganised
Pterry> Lines: 0
Pterry> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 1993 23:28:15 +0000
Pterry> Sender: use...@demon.co.uk

Ah! I am enlightened. The perfect post. This is the Zen of Usenet.

Matthew
--
Matthew Seaman <mat...@dyson.ox.ac.uk> Non-NeXT mail
<mat...@viriconium.ocms.ox.ac.uk> NeXT mail
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, S. Parks Rd., Oxford, OX1 3QR, England
Tel +44 (0)865 272640 Fax +44 (0)865 272690

Hugh JE Davies

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Sep 21, 1993, 5:04:19 AM9/21/93
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In article 748394...@unseen.demon.co.uk, tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett) writes:
>

Yes? And....?

Regards,

Hugh.
------------------------------------------------------------------
Huge...@rx.xerox.com Rank Xerox Technical Centre, WGC, UK.
I don't speak for Xerox, nor they for me.
The road to Paradise is through Intercourse.

Terry Pratchett

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Sep 21, 1993, 3:22:34 PM9/21/93
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>In article <748394...@unseen.demon.co.uk> tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk
> (Terry Pratchett) writes:
>
>Pterry> Newsgroups: alt.fan.pratchett
>Pterry> From: tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett)
>Pterry> Distribution: world
>Pterry> Organization: Disorganised
>Pterry> Lines: 0
>Pterry> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 1993 23:28:15 +0000
>Pterry> Sender: use...@demon.co.uk
>
> Ah! I am enlightened. The perfect post. This is the Zen of Usenet.
>
> Matthew
>--

I'm trying to remember what the hell it was I was trying to post. Oh, yes...it
was this chapter from a book I'm writing. I put in on the net for safety. Oh,
what..you mean...oh, no...

Terry

Maurizio Codogno

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Sep 22, 1993, 10:26:39 AM9/22/93
to
>> (Terry Pratchett) writes: (???)

>> Ah! I am enlightened. The perfect post. This is the Zen of Usenet.
>>
>> Matthew
>>--
>I'm trying to remember what the hell it was I was trying to post. Oh, yes...it
>was this chapter from a book I'm writing. I put in on the net for safety. Oh,
>what..you mean...oh, no...
>
>Terry


You know, there is always a million-to-one chance that a text in
Usenet get lost.

Simon Hart

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Sep 22, 1993, 10:39:39 AM9/22/93
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In article 748639...@unseen.demon.co.uk, tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett) writes:

>> [ Perfect Post Pinched ]


>>--
>I'm trying to remember what the hell it was I was trying to post. Oh, yes...it
>was this chapter from a book I'm writing. I put in on the net for safety. Oh,
>what..you mean...oh, no...
>
>Terry


It is in the nature of nets to catch things, so it will probably catch the chapter.
Make sure you have a bucket handy to put your catch in or all the bits will get away. Of course the chapter may be too slim and slippery and will eel its way out of the
net never to be seen again but I doubt that. Far to 'meaty' for that. Some good
solid cod or even a bit of hake. Unless, of course, you prefer your fish flat.
In which case stand on the cod now. AAAAHHHH!!!! Not that cod, you cretin!!!!

---
Simon Hart

--------------------

Decision Power Support

ICL (U.K) Ltd. tel: 0344 473742
Lovelace Road intl: +44-344-473742
Bracknell e-mail: ha...@sst.icl.co.uk
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--------------------

Andrew Farrell

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Sep 22, 1993, 11:08:51 AM9/22/93
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ha...@sst.icl.co.uk (Simon Hart) writes:

>In which case stand on the cod now. AAAAHHHH!!!! Not that cod, you cretin!!!!

Oh sorry, man.

Andrew (Cod,Codpiece, it's an easy mistake to make.)
--
Whereabouts: Mathsoc, Trinity, Centre of The Universe.
Hold on. That wasn't my password.

Jens Stark

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Sep 23, 1993, 5:57:53 AM9/23/93
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tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett) writes:

>I'm trying to remember what the hell it was I was trying to post. Oh, yes...it
>was this chapter from a book I'm writing. I put in on the net for safety. Oh,
>what..you mean...oh, no...

Spoilers ahead !!!

I caught it ( this time :-) ).

That bit about the band names is pretty good - it will result in at least
one page in the apf. The bit about the librarian puzzled me at first, until
I remembered that missing chord thread again.
The funniest thing of all is C.M.O.T Dibblers deal with the Morris
dancers...

Jens

Ian Evans

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Sep 25, 1993, 7:57:20 AM9/25/93
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mcod...@nyx.cs.du.edu (Maurizio Codogno) writes:
>In article <748394...@unseen.demon.co.uk> tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk writes:
>>
>The first sign of Terry wanting to divorce from his newsgroup? :-(

No, he's trying to escape from this group...

In previous articles from tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk:

> Terry^[

> Terry^[

> Terry
> ^[

ia...@werple.apana.org.au
.sig left at last job by mistake.

Anthony Wilkinson

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Sep 26, 1993, 9:39:01 AM9/26/93
to
On the subject of chapters (lost or otherwise) Terry, is there some reason
that you don't use chapters in the discworld novels? Is it to make sure that
we don't have a chance to put the book down until we finish reading it ?
Is there some reason why Carpet People and the nome trilogy do have chapters?

Anthony
p.s. no offense but I thought you of all people could have thought of something
new RE: lost chapter.

>
> Terry
___________________________________________________________________________
Anthony Wilkinson A.WIL...@cc.uq.edu.au
COMPUTER SCIENCE
UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND
Brisbane Qld 4072 AUSTRALIA

Aaron 'Wigs' Wigley

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Sep 26, 1993, 8:06:20 PM9/26/93
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Maurizio Codogno (mcod...@nyx.cs.du.edu) wrote:: >I'm trying to remember what the hell it was I was trying to post. Oh, yes...it

: >was this chapter from a book I'm writing. I put in on the net for safety. Oh,
: >what..you mean...oh, no...
: >
: >Terry
:
: You know, there is always a million-to-one chance that a text in
: Usenet get lost.

Hmm. Strange. I could have swore it was available by anonymous ftp
at one stage :-)

The Wigs of Oz,
Aaron Wigley

Leo Breebaart

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Sep 27, 1993, 5:10:30 AM9/27/93
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mail_a...@uqvax.cc.uq.oz.au (Anthony Wilkinson) writes:

> [...] Terry, is there some reason that you don't use chapters in the
> discworld novels? [...] Is there some reason why Carpet People and


> the nome trilogy do have chapters?

The answer to both your questions can be found in the Annotated Pratchett
File (available for anonymous ftp from the Pratchett Archives at
ftp.cp.tn.tudelft.nl [192.31.126.16], or send a message saying "send
apf/apf-6.0" to pratchet...@cp.tn.tudelft.nl), in which you will find,
amongst other things:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
- On the lack of chapters in the Discworld novels

"DW books don't have chapters because, well, I just never got into the
habit of chapters. I'm not sure why they should exist (except maybe in
children's books, to allow the parent to say "I'll read to the end of the
chapter and then you must go to sleep."). Films don't have chapters.
Besides, I think they interfere with the shape of the story. Use a
bookmark is my advice."
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
Leo Breebaart (leo @ cp.tn.tudelft.nl)

Andy Holyer

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Sep 27, 1993, 6:12:37 AM9/27/93
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Yes, but the file mysteriously transmuted into a sample of a Queen song...

---
&ndy Holyer, COGS, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
"The English are the most tasteless nation on earth, which is why they
set such store by it" - Joe Orton

Terry Pratchett

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Sep 26, 1993, 3:51:47 PM9/26/93
to
I've never seen the point of chapters. I genuinely don't think of a story
in those terms. Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?

I have to shove them in the putative YA books because my editor screams until
I do.

Terry

Neil L Cook

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Sep 27, 1993, 10:45:32 AM9/27/93
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In article <749073...@unseen.demon.co.uk>, tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett) writes:
|> I have to shove them in the putative YA books because my editor screams until
|> I do.

Has anyone else apart from me found the YA books to be a little, er, well
patronising. Well, not patronising as such but, well they are set in 20th
Century Britain right? Like 1993? So why do I feel that they are set in
"Famous Five Land"? It's like that mythical world of the 50's that
never existed.

I think Tezza P should get a bit more gritty, less rose tinted
spectacles. Roald Dahl managed to do that with books which I was
reading when I was 5. You never felt as *cosy* as you do with these YA
books. I dunno, how many "Young Adults" today can relate to that kind
of cosy tea-time world? It would be interesting to see how many of the
sales of OYCSM and JAD are to people already into TP and distinctly
not in the YA age group.

Neil.

Paul Hounslow

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Sep 27, 1993, 10:56:35 AM9/27/93
to

The reason for having chapters is so I can actually get my wife to do something ;-)
As every time I ask she says: "Ok, when I get to the end of this chapter."

I must also admit that this works the other way round too. Also neither of us
would get any sleep (or anything else for that matter ;-)) as neither of us can
put a book down until either the end of the chapter or book (which ever comes last
for a really good one ;-)).

73's de Paul

----
Paul Hounslow The smelling pistakes are all my own.
Packet: G4YFE@GB7BEQ EMail: ssrh...@reading.ac.uk
1990 16 valve K100LT DoD #0573

Programming makes you paranoid (Now where was that bug? No not THAT one).
Motorcycling makes you paranoid (Is that ovloV trying to kill me? YES!).
I do both WHO SAID THAT!

Paula Mickevich

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Sep 27, 1993, 8:20:53 AM9/27/93
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In article <286uac$o...@unicorn.ccc.nottingham.ac.uk> n...@turing.cs.nott.ac.uk (Neil L Cook) writes:

Has anyone else apart from me found the YA books to be a little, er, well
patronising. Well, not patronising as such but, well they are set in 20th
Century Britain right? Like 1993? So why do I feel that they are set in
"Famous Five Land"? It's like that mythical world of the 50's that
never existed.

I think Tezza P should get a bit more gritty, less rose tinted

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


spectacles. Roald Dahl managed to do that with books which I was
reading when I was 5. You never felt as *cosy* as you do with these YA
books. I dunno, how many "Young Adults" today can relate to that kind
of cosy tea-time world? It would be interesting to see how many of the
sales of OYCSM and JAD are to people already into TP and distinctly
not in the YA age group.

Neil.

I think Terry is wonderful just the way he is. If we want Dahl, we'll
read Dahl. When I was a young adult I was reading H.P. Lovecraft
and other horror writers. the YAs I know now (nieces and nephews and son)
are into Christopher Pike and R.L.Stine two gory horror writers and
Stephen King for the older ones. I read Dahl, not as a kid, but as a
parent to my young son. I don';t run out to buy Dahl but I do Terry!

Paula
--
paula mickevich MIT
casi...@hq.lcs.mit.edu Laboratory for Computer Science

Rich 'mcmxciibo' Holmes

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Sep 27, 1993, 2:00:09 PM9/27/93
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In article <749073...@unseen.demon.co.uk> tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett) writes:

> I've never seen the point of chapters. I genuinely don't think of a story
>in those terms. Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?

'Cause most people can sit for 90 minutes or so without having to get
up and take a pee. Reading an entire novel without urinating is
considerably more difficult. Especially a Discworld novel, where
sometimes I have to go pee at every punchline.

--
- Rich "mcmxciibo" Holmes

The first person to say something on this Net doesn't have a chance
(and it is usually me). -- John_-_Winston

Andrew Clive Millard

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Sep 27, 1993, 2:40:08 PM9/27/93
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In article <749073...@unseen.demon.co.uk> tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk writes:
> I've never seen the point of chapters. I genuinely don't think of a story
>in those terms. Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?

Ah... You've obviously never tried to watch one on American television.

Andrew.

Paul Mc Auley

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Sep 28, 1993, 4:40:51 AM9/28/93
to

Particularly in Power Cable, Nebraska ... :-)

Come to think of it, the same applies to Sky 1 (a good reason not to watch)
(the other one being the lack of watchable programs...) ;-)
Paul
--
______________________
Paul Mc Auley \ "Deliver yesterday, code today, think tomorrow."
pmca...@maths.tcd.ie \

Colin Sudlow

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Sep 28, 1993, 7:56:47 AM9/28/93
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Yes but Terry how do we know when it is the best time to put the kettle on for
a cup of tea, grab an ice cream from the fridge, etc. I mean, put the book down
when you haven't got to the end of a convenient chapter and you'll probably
miss something exciting or loose track of the plot.

-+-+-
Colin (who always thought that the large-ish gaps between the text in Terry's
books were the end of each 'chapter` and the publishing company was too
mean to waste the paper and ink required to print Chapter x each time)

David Jenkins

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Sep 28, 1993, 8:25:09 AM9/28/93
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In article <2898pv$m...@unicorn.ccc.nottingham.ac.uk>,

"Bookmarks! Come an' get your Bookmarks 'ere!"

"What Sir? Pieces of paper? My oh my, no Sir! These are made from
specially selected and crafted sheets of best pressed cellulose, so
fresh the tree don't know they're gone yet!"

...with apologies to C.M.O.T. Dibbler :-)

--

David Jenkins

...and today's word is:

Millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship.


Leo Breebaart

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Sep 28, 1993, 8:13:49 AM9/28/93
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This article contains (small) spoilers about the 'Johnny' novels.


n...@turing.cs.nott.ac.uk (Neil L Cook) writes:

> I think Tezza P should get a bit more gritty, less rose tinted
> spectacles.

Have we been reading the same books?

"Only You Can Save Mankind" is a book that has war as a major theme,
and which doesn't shy away from asking several quite mature and
uncomfortable questions about the subject. It's also about a kid whose
parents are in the process of breaking up with each other. And did you
get the impression that Sigourney's life is a particularly happy one?
Or BigMac's? In this book a couple of kids hijack a car and smash
themselves to pieces. What fun, what joy, such rose-colored glasses!

"Johnny and the Dead" is a book that has death as a major theme, and
which doesn't shy away from asking several quite mature and
uncomfortable questions about the subject (e.g. Mr. Whatshisname, who
committed suicide). Johnny's parents are now separated. The life he
and his friends live doesn't strike me as particularly promising or
fulfilling or even happy. The book is not quite as bleak as OYCSM, no,
but I would be hard pressed to compare it to 'fabulous five' types of
YA books, as you seem to find appropriate.

So here we have these two books, one about war, one about death, each
about as serious as you can get in the genre, and the more I think
about it, the less I understand where you get the strange idea that
rose-colored spectacles of any kind are involved in Terry's YA novels...

Colin MacDonald

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Sep 28, 1993, 9:27:49 AM9/28/93
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Rich 'mcmxciibo' Holmes (rsho...@mothra.syr.EDU) wrote:

: In article <749073...@unseen.demon.co.uk> tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk (Terry Pratchett) writes:

: > I've never seen the point of chapters. I genuinely don't think of a story
: >in those terms. Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?

: 'Cause most people can sit for 90 minutes or so without having to get
: up and take a pee. Reading an entire novel without urinating is
: considerably more difficult. Especially a Discworld novel, where
: sometimes I have to go pee at every punchline.

You can see a doctor about this without feeling embarassed. Honest,
lots of people have, uh, trouble like yours and the operation is quite
simple and quick. Maybe you should try it...

Colin

--
Colin MacDonald, Clinical Neurosciences, Univ of Edinburgh... this screen is too

Stewart Stremler

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Sep 28, 1993, 3:41:39 PM9/28/93
to
Terry Pratchett writes:
> I've never seen the point of chapters. I genuinely don't think of a story
> in those terms. Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?
>
> I have to shove them in the putative YA books because my editor screams until
> I do.

Colin Sudlow (co...@Indurain.chemeng.nott.ac.uk) wrote:
> Yes but Terry how do we know when it is the best time to put the kettle on for
>a cup of tea, grab an ice cream from the fridge, etc. I mean, put the book down
> when you haven't got to the end of a convenient chapter and you'll probably
> miss something exciting or loose track of the plot.

Who puts the book *down*? Whenever I bring a new TP book home, I read it
cover to cover. Takes me a little while, and things like dinner, bedtime,
bathroom breaks, and so forth just have to wait....

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anarchy does not mean "without rules"; Anarchy | Stewart Stremler
means "without government" -- which would be | masc...@ucssun1.sdsu.edu
just fine, if everyone wasn't greedy and stupid.| FidoNet: 1:202/1111
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

McEWAN Shane

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Sep 28, 1993, 9:17:59 PM9/28/93
to
Rich 'mcmxciibo' Holmes (rsho...@mothra.syr.EDU) theorised:

>> I've never seen the point of chapters. I genuinely don't think of a story
>>in those terms. Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?

>'Cause most people can sit for 90 minutes or so without having to get
>up and take a pee. Reading an entire novel without urinating is
>considerably more difficult. Especially a Discworld novel, where
>sometimes I have to go pee at every punchline.

I use the little scene change blank lines (I'm sure there is a technical name
for them) for toilet breaks. Unfortunately sometimes I accidentally read the
first sentence of the next bit and I get caught up again. *sigh*

--
"Good evening. Here is the news on Friday the 27th of Geldof.
Archaeologists near Mount Sinai have discovered what is believed to be a
missing page from the Bible. The page is presently being carbon dated in
Bonn. If genuine, it belongs at the beginning of the Bible and is believed
to read, 'To my darling Candy. All characters portrayed within this book are
ficticious and any resemblance to persons living or dead is purely
coincidental.' The page has been universally condemed by church leaders."
- Groovy Channel 27 News "Red Dwarf: Better Than Life"

Stuart Foster

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Sep 29, 1993, 12:29:20 PM9/29/93
to

In article <749073...@unseen.demon.co.uk> tprat...@unseen.demon.co.uk wri
tes:

>
> Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?

They do don't they ?
(From the person who watches far too much tv and hasn't set foot in a cinema
for many a year).

kew@pinn

Bob Voisey

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Sep 29, 1993, 5:01:38 AM9/29/93
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In article <leo.74...@draconis.cp.tn.tudelft.nl> l...@cp.tn.tudelft.nl writes:
>but I would be hard pressed to compare it to 'fabulous five' types of

Famous Five.. the fabulous ones were only four..

Bob (the pedant)

--
Go away, else I shall taunt you a second time.

b...@cryton.demon.co.uk vox+44(749)670058 fax+44(749)670809 dat+44(749)670030

Steven van Dijk

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Sep 29, 1993, 6:22:47 AM9/29/93
to

> I've never seen the point of chapters.

It gives you an excuse to put the book _down_ and go to _sleep_. :-) You can
tell a lot about a book if it doesn't need chapters.

> Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?

Because films end after 90 minutes.

--

CU ZVD

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

David Silberstein

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Sep 29, 1993, 4:47:14 AM9/29/93
to
In article <28a41j$3...@gondor.sdsu.edu>, stre...@ucssun1.sdsu.edu (Stewart

Stremler) says:
>
>Terry Pratchett writes:
>> I've never seen the point of chapters. I genuinely don't think of a story
>> in those terms. Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?
>>
>> I have to shove them in the putative YA books because my editor screams until
>> I do.
>
>Colin Sudlow (co...@Indurain.chemeng.nott.ac.uk) wrote:
>>Yes but Terry how do we know when it is the best time to put the kettle on
>>for a cup of tea, grab an ice cream from the fridge, etc. I mean, put the n

>>book down when you haven't got to the end of a convenient chapter and you'll
>>probably miss something exciting or loose track of the plot.
>
>Who puts the book *down*? Whenever I bring a new TP book home, I read it
>cover to cover. Takes me a little while, and things like dinner, bedtime,
>bathroom breaks, and so forth just have to wait....

Undead! Undead!
He doesn't pass water!
.......................
Sorry, I came a little unglued there for a bit....

Besides, zombies and such have rights too. I suppose they have the right to
read (Terry Pratchett books) just like anyone else.
Hmm. Now what would that be called? Lexage? Or maybe lexicage? Yes, that
sounds about rights...

-David
-I didn't pass water recently either, but I did eat a garlic bagel with supper.

Usenet rights for net.surfs, Imean net.serfs:
Lexicage, lurkage, postage, bandwidth-wastage, signatures, flameage,
flamebaitage, spoilers when accompainied by appropriate warning,
kibology, sarcasm & april-foolage.

David Silberstein

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Sep 29, 1993, 2:21:06 PM9/29/93
to
In article <93272.04...@CUNYVM.CUNY.EDU>, David Silberstein
<DA...@CUNYVM.CUNY.EDU> says:
>

>Usenet rights for net.surfs, Imean net.serfs:
>Lexicage, lurkage, postage, bandwidth-wastage, signatures, flameage,
>flamebaitage, spoilers when accompainied by appropriate warning,
>kibology, sarcasm & april-foolage.

I definitely left out some there. Two of the most important that are used
LOTS in this (and other) newsgroups:

Thread-driftage and in-jokage

-- David
Born without a face. Now it's up to you.

Buddha Buck

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Sep 30, 1993, 11:15:31 PM9/30/93
to
In article <2898pv$m...@unicorn.ccc.nottingham.ac.uk> co...@Indurain.chemeng.nott.ac.uk (Colin Sudlow) writes:
>Terry Pratchett writes:
>|> I've never seen the point of chapters. I genuinely don't think of a story
>|> in those terms. Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?
>|>
>|> I have to shove them in the putative YA books because my editor screams until
>|> I do.
>|>
>Yes but Terry how do we know when it is the best time to put the kettle on for
>a cup of tea, grab an ice cream from the fridge, etc. I mean, put the book
>down when you haven't got to the end of a convenient chapter and you'll
>probably miss something exciting or loose track of the plot.
>

Ahh, that's easy. Don't put the book down. I've gotten into the habit of
doing many normal things with only minor glances while reading. NONE of the
things mentioned so far are difficult to do while reading a book (except for
sleeping). Putting a kettle on is easy (use one hand to grab kettle, bring
to sink, put down kettle, turn on water, pick up kettle, fill kettle, put
down kettle, turn off water, take kettle to stove, put kettle on burner,
turn on burner (and light if necessary), use other hand to hold book to
current page, and steal time from other hand to turn pages, as necessary),
grabbing things from the fridge is also easy. Visiting the "comfort
facilities" (one of the modern euphemisms) is not difficult, and you have
time to enjoy the book, too.

Damian Conway

unread,
Sep 30, 1993, 10:47:06 PM9/30/93
to
ssrh...@reading.ac.uk (Paul Hounslow) writes:

>The reason for having chapters is so I can actually get my wife to do

>The something ;-) As every time I ask she says: "Ok, when I get to the
>The end of this chapter."

Yer in luck, Guv.
I've got this luverly line of paperback inserts, do you a treat....

====================================
| |
| said Rincewind, "I'll go get some |
| help." He turned, bolted down the |
| stairs, out the door, and flat on |
| his face, as darkness crashed upon |
| him like the fist of an unexpected |
| troll. |
| "Who goes there?" boomed Detritus |
| cheerfully. |
| |
| |
| End of Chapter 1. |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
| |
====================================

Jus' stick it between yer next two pages and vwa-la: instant chapters!
Only 29.99 + p&p, and I'm cuttin' me on throat!

damian
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
who: Damian Conway email: dam...@bruce.cs.monash.edu.au
where: Dept. Computer Science phone: +61-3-565-5184
Monash University fax: +61-3-565-5146
Clayton 3168 quote: "A pessimist is never disappointed."
AUSTRALIA

Michael Elbel

unread,
Oct 1, 1993, 11:31:27 AM10/1/93
to

>>: You know, there is always a million-to-one chance that a text in
>>: Usenet get lost.
>>
>>Hmm. Strange. I could have swore it was available by anonymous ftp
>>at one stage :-)
>>
>Yes, but the file mysteriously transmuted into a sample of a Queen song...

What, do you want to tell us that the ftp site is set up in a car
with the disks in the glove compartment???

Michael
--
Michael Elbel, Digital-PCS GmbH, Muenchen, Germany - m...@dude.pcs.dec.com
Intelligenz is sowieso nur wat fuer Doofe - Mia
Fermentation fault (coors dumped)

Mark Staples

unread,
Oct 2, 1993, 8:38:49 AM10/2/93
to

>Terry Pratchett writes:
>|> I've never seen the point of chapters. I genuinely don't think of a story
>|> in those terms. Why don't films have an interval every ten minutes or so?
>|>
>|> I have to shove them in the putative YA books because my editor screams until
>|> I do.
>|>
>Yes but Terry how do we know when it is the best time to put the kettle on for
>a cup of tea, grab an ice cream from the fridge, etc. I mean, put the book down
>when you haven't got to the end of a convenient chapter and you'll probably
>miss something exciting or loose track of the plot.

Well, Terry does seem fond of footnotes though, so maybe he could insert
a footnote here or there to let us Gentle Readers know when the action
has died down enough to take a quick break...

Mark "Yes, I know -- PTerry doesn't let the action die down" Staples
--
Mark Staples GMT+10 hours mar...@cs.uq.oz.au "capricorn"
Department of Computer Science, University of Queensland, 4072, Australia
--
Mark Staples GMT+10 hours mar...@cs.uq.oz.au "capricorn"
Department of Computer Science, University of Queensland, 4072, Australia

Rich 'mcmxciibo' Holmes

unread,
Oct 2, 1993, 11:31:40 PM10/2/93
to
In article <1993Oct1.0...@mnemosyne.cs.du.edu> bb...@nyx.cs.du.edu (Buddha Buck) writes:

>Visiting the "comfort
>facilities" (one of the modern euphemisms) is not difficult, and you have
>time to enjoy the book, too.

What? And risk dropping my autographed copy of "Small Gods" down the
loo?

--
************** ---------------------------------------- **********************

R.S. Holmes If it wasn't for the fact
(rich@mailbox. ___ /~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~/| that a monster called The
syr.edu) ____ / //| Head was plunging a metal
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|/ | pipe up his nose prepara-
"BEING DEAD ___ |~~~~~~~~O~~~~~~~~| | tory to sucking his brains
IS NOT ____ | | /\_ out, Michael Smith could
COMPULSORY" |_________________|/\_/ almost laugh." -- P. Milligan
-- Discworld //_//_//_//_//_//_
\_/\_/\_/\_/\_/\_/
/////////////////////////////////////|\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

Philip HOENIG

unread,
Oct 4, 1993, 12:22:07 AM10/4/93
to
^^^^^^^^^

Indeed?


/-----------------------------------------------------------------------------\
\ Phil "You mean my Kingswood's not a 4WD?" Hoenig. <<<<<<< ph...@ecr.mu.oz.au /
/ To boldly drive where no man has driven before... <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< \
\-----------------------------------------------------------------------------/

Hugh Evans (ESA/ESTEC/WMA Netherlands)

unread,
Oct 5, 1993, 6:03:23 AM10/5/93
to
(McEWAN Shane) pontificates:

|>Rich 'mcmxciibo' Holmes (rsho...@mothra.syr.EDU) theorised:
|>
|>>'Cause most people can sit for 90 minutes or so without having to get
|>>up and take a pee. Reading an entire novel without urinating is
|>>considerably more difficult. Especially a Discworld novel, where
|>>sometimes I have to go pee at every punchline.
|>
|>I use the little scene change blank lines (I'm sure there is a technical name
|>for them) for toilet breaks. Unfortunately sometimes I accidentally read the
|>first sentence of the next bit and I get caught up again. *sigh*
|>

I can't believe nobody just takes the book into the bog with them!

Just strap yourself down to the loo (seatbelts are an optional extra on
most toilets) with a couple dozen sandwiches and bottles of beer, and then
you don't have to move until you reach the end of the book.

This behaviour is not recommended in houses with multiple occupants!

--
Hugh Evans
European Space Research and Technology Centre - Noorwijk, Netherlands
Internet: hev...@wm.estec.esa.nl SPAN: ESTWM2::hevans

But she stopped herself. You didn't juggle matches in a firework factory.
(Terry Pratchett, Witches Abroad)

M J Tranter

unread,
Oct 6, 1993, 7:31:51 AM10/6/93
to
Hugh Evans (ESA/ESTEC/WMA Netherlands) (hev...@estwm0.wm.estec.esa.nl) wrote:
: (McEWAN Shane) pontificates:

[stuff deleted]

: I can't believe nobody just takes the book into the bog with them!

: Just strap yourself down to the loo (seatbelts are an optional extra on
: most toilets) with a couple dozen sandwiches and bottles of beer, and then
: you don't have to move until you reach the end of the book.

: This behaviour is not recommended in houses with multiple occupants!

... or if you have ill fitting windows in your bathroom!

--
Mette Tranter
<me...@uk.ac.ed.castle> --<*>-- Librarians rule OOOK!
<m...@uk.ac.ed.geovax>

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