Mythagoras Magazine

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Watts Martin

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Sep 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/9/96
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MYTHAGORAS
New Tales & Animal Legend
--++--

Mythagoras is a small press fiction magazine slated to debut in January
1997. Its focus is on speculative fiction, with an accent on zoomorphic
myth, magic realism and urban fantasy.

If you're interested in learning more about Mythagoras, visit our web site,
which features writers' and artists' guidelines and information on charter
subscriptions, advertising rates, and who to contact if you're interested in
distributing the magazine. The site will soon feature "progress reports" on
our first issue and successive ones.

http://www.mythagoras.com/

If you're interested in more information but don't have access to browsing
software, send email to "mi...@mythagoras.com".


Jack Furlong - HillBluffer

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Sep 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/11/96
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In article <511ar2$hmf@moon>, mi...@agii.solluna.org (Watts Martin) wrote:
> MYTHAGORAS
> New Tales & Animal Legend
> --++--
>
>Mythagoras is a small press fiction magazine slated to debut in January
>1997. Its focus is on speculative fiction, with an accent on zoomorphic
>myth, magic realism and urban fantasy.

De old Bear waves his copy of No. 3, Autumn 1990
You folx are starting up again!?! Coooool!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
HillBluffer @ FurryMUCK, Furtoonia, FluffMUCK
Jack Furlong - journeyman Furry & Anime Artist
Bearly Sane Studios Po Box 9104 Largo, Fla 33771-9104
Home Page - http://www.netcom.com/~jfurlong
"Now just shut up, and let me think!"
Aahz - Another Fine Myth - Robert Asprin

Rivercoon

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Sep 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/11/96
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Will this be issue 4 or volume 2 , issue 1?

Jasper Worthington

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Sep 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/12/96
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> >Mythagoras is a small press fiction magazine slated to debut in January
> >1997. Its focus is on speculative fiction, with an accent on zoomorphic
> >myth, magic realism and urban fantasy.
>
> De old Bear waves his copy of No. 3, Autumn 1990
> You folx are starting up again!?! Coooool!

Is this going to pick up with issue #4 or is it a whole new book?

Watts Martin

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Sep 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/12/96
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In article <516iov$d...@sjx-ixn6.ix.netcom.com>, Jack Furlong - HillBluffer wrote:

>In article <511ar2$hmf@moon>, mi...@agii.solluna.org (Watts Martin) wrote:

>>Mythagoras is a small press fiction magazine slated to debut in January
>>1997. Its focus is on speculative fiction, with an accent on zoomorphic
>>myth, magic realism and urban fantasy.
>
>De old Bear waves his copy of No. 3, Autumn 1990
>You folx are starting up again!?! Coooool!

Yep, same main editor guys (Bill Biersdorf and yours truly) along with new
business guys, like Allen Petlock. The new issue will be #1 again,
primarily to confuse the few people like yourself who have issues from the
original run. It'll have more of a literary focus than the first run did,
and what we hope will be a useful push to get it into specialty and
independent bookstores...


Highwolf

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Sep 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/12/96
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Glad to see it in pubication again. I have a copy of Mythagoras #3
when I went to training in Tampa, Fla in early 1991. I recognize furry
aritsts that have contributed to the magazine like Terri Smith.

Jack Furlong - HillBluffer

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Sep 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/13/96
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In article <519o22$ncf@moon>, mi...@agii.solluna.org (Watts Martin) wrote:
>In article <516iov$d...@sjx-ixn6.ix.netcom.com>, Jack Furlong - HillBluffer
wrote:
>
>>In article <511ar2$hmf@moon>, mi...@agii.solluna.org (Watts Martin) wrote:
>>>Mythagoras is a small press fiction magazine slated to debut in January
>>>1997. Its focus is on speculative fiction, with an accent on zoomorphic
>>>myth, magic realism and urban fantasy.
>>
>>De old Bear waves his copy of No. 3, Autumn 1990
>>You folx are starting up again!?! Coooool!
>
>Yep, same main editor guys (Bill Biersdorf and yours truly) along with new
>business guys, like Allen Petlock. The new issue will be #1 again,
>primarily to confuse the few people like yourself who have issues from the
>original run. It'll have more of a literary focus than the first run did,
>and what we hope will be a useful push to get it into specialty and
>independent bookstores...

Drop me a line, I've got an 'in' to a store that I know
will carry it for you, here in Largo...<grin>

(sides', then _I_ can get it easier...<grin> )

Farthing W Fox

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Sep 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/13/96
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In article <511ar2$hmf@moon> mi...@agii.solluna.org (Watts Martin) writes:

> MYTHAGORAS
> New Tales & Animal Legend
> --++--

> Mythagoras is a small press fiction magazine slated to debut in January


> 1997. Its focus is on speculative fiction, with an accent on zoomorphic
> myth, magic realism and urban fantasy.

Assuming that you can maintain mid-January as the release date for the
first issue, would we expect to see Mythagoras for sale at ConFurence?

--
F W Fox
at f...@vulpes.demon.co.uk http://www.fysh.org/foxes/
f...@fysh.org http://www.fysh.org/~fox/

Watts Martin

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Sep 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/13/96
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In article <323814...@geocities.com>, Jasper Worthington wrote:
>> >Mythagoras is a small press fiction magazine slated to debut in January
>> >1997. Its focus is on speculative fiction, with an accent on zoomorphic
>> >myth, magic realism and urban fantasy.
>>
>> De old Bear waves his copy of No. 3, Autumn 1990
>> You folx are starting up again!?! Coooool!
>
> Is this going to pick up with issue #4 or is it a whole new book?

New book. It may be referred to as "Volume 2" internally, but the cover
will say #1.

Issue #4 of the old Mythagoras, in a sense, is the one issue of
'Zoomorphica' that came out in 1992. Issues of ZM will probably be
available as freebies at cons Mythagoras goes to, given out as subscription
gifts, thrown off tall buildings, etc. (It's a perfectly good issue, mind
you, and has what I think is the only written-for-a-furry-magazine story by
a Hugo winner in it -- "Foxy Lady," by Lawrence Watt-Evans. It was just
undersold, or overprinted, depending on how you look at such things, and I
still have a *lot* left.)


D. Bayles

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Sep 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/13/96
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In article <519o22$ncf@moon>, Watts Martin <mi...@agii.solluna.org> wrote:
>
>Yep, same main editor guys (Bill Biersdorf and yours truly) along with new
>business guys, like Allen Petlock. The new issue will be #1 again,
>primarily to confuse the few people like yourself who have issues from the
>original run. It'll have more of a literary focus than the first run did,
>and what we hope will be a useful push to get it into specialty and
>independent bookstores...
>

Sounds very interesting! Could you tell me (and anyone else whos
interested) more about it, ie., submission info and stuff?

Sham, whos got a story
in her, somewhere.


Watts Martin

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Sep 14, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/14/96
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In article <m2enk6v...@vulpes.demon.co.uk>, Farthing W Fox wrote:
>Assuming that you can maintain mid-January as the release date for the
>first issue, would we expect to see Mythagoras for sale at ConFurence?

Yes. As dealers' tables for the upcoming CF sold out some time in Summer
1972, as far as I can tell, we will be set up in the "Artists' Alley"
section, or failing that, in a pushcart somewhere, also selling hot dogs.


Watts Martin

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Sep 14, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/14/96
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In article <51cngg$p...@mcmail.CIS.McMaster.CA>, D. Bayles wrote:
>Sounds very interesting! Could you tell me (and anyone else whos
>interested) more about it, ie., submission info and stuff?

The billing for the magazine in web directories has been "a sf/fantasy
literary magazine with an emphasis on zoomorphic myth, urban fantasy and
magic realism." Our ideal story length is 2,000 to 8,000 words. We accept
electronic submissions in most native word processor formats unless they're
really weird (no SuperScripsit files from you TRS-80 users). We'll take
simultaneous submissions with warning. We won't accept material that's been
previously published outside of an APA or other closed-circulation place
(for netheads, this means a mailing list is okay, but a web page or
newsgroup probably isn't).

For art submissions, we don't take pinups or explicit pieces, and won't
print previously published work. We're looking for artists who are willing
to illustrate stories -- we'd like to see samples of work and lists of what
the artists like and don't like as far as story themes. Artists may be
asked for full-page pieces on relatively short notice, so those whose
reaction to "Read this and draw me a cool picture within two or three weeks"
involves abject panic might not want to volunteer.

Our standard pay rate will be $15/pg for full page (interior) artwork and
$.01/word for stories.

Full submission guidelines (both writing and art) are on the web site at
http://www.mythagoras.com/. There's also our address, ordering information,
whining messages asking for help in distribution, and our such-a-deal
advertising rates.

When the content for issue #1 is finalized it'll be announced in this
newsgroup, rec.arts.prose and probably rec.arts.sf.written. There will also
be periodic updates on progress on the web page.


Dennis Lee Bieber

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Sep 14, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/14/96
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On 14 Sep 1996 18:57:19 GMT in alt.fan.furry,
Watts Martin (mi...@agii.solluna.org) declaimed:

> magic realism." Our ideal story length is 2,000 to 8,000 words. We accept
> electronic submissions in most native word processor formats unless they're
> really weird (no SuperScripsit files from you TRS-80 users). We'll take

/DISCRIMINATION!/ <G>

Though really, is SuperScripsit that much different from
regular Scripsit?

As I recall (haven't booted the Mod III/4 in nearly 7 years)
regular Scripsit files were effectively just plain ASCII -- the
formatting being done via a variant of "dot commands". Should be
quite easy to write conversion macro's to handle them (at least, it
would be on my Amiga since all my word-processors and most of my
editors support ARexx interfaces).


{Beware of old CS majors trained on off-beat equipment -- we
recognize elegance in an OS! Both the TRS-80 and the Amiga were
chosen for the OS capabilities, which outperformed any of their peers
of the time}

--
> ============================================================ <
> wulf...@netcom.com | Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber KD6MOG <
> news.dm.net | Bestiaria Support Staff <
> ============================================================ <
> PGP key: Finger wulf...@netcom.com <
> Home Page: ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/wu/wulfraed/wulfraed.htm <

Steve Gattuso

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Sep 14, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/14/96
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Watts Martin wrote:

> Yes. As dealers' tables for the upcoming CF sold out some time in
> Summer 1972, as far as I can tell, we will be set up in the "Artists'
> Alley" section, or failing that, in a pushcart somewhere, also selling
> hot dogs.

Actually, they sold out in the Summer of '69, which is what that musical
hack Bryan Adams must have been singing about. =};-3

By the way, I'll take a kraut dog with extra mustard.

Dennis Lee Bieber

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Sep 17, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/17/96
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On 17 Sep 1996 02:36:23 GMT in alt.fan.furry,
Watts Martin (mi...@agii.solluna.org) declaimed:

>
> I bet you didn't expect a non-flippant reply to this, did you? Corollary:
> beware of part-time writers and Z80 hackers who actively used TRS-80 word
> processors until 1991. (For the record, I used AllWrite under NEWDOS/80,
> and later, LeScript under LS-DOS.)

I will admit to being a bit surprised by it... and pleased...

Watts Martin

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Sep 17, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/17/96
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In article <wulfraedD...@netcom.com>, Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:
>On 14 Sep 1996 18:57:19 GMT in alt.fan.furry,
>Watts Martin (mi...@agii.solluna.org) declaimed:
>

> > magic realism." Our ideal story length is 2,000 to 8,000 words. We accept
> > electronic submissions in most native word processor formats unless they're
> > really weird (no SuperScripsit files from you TRS-80 users). We'll take
>
> /DISCRIMINATION!/ <G>
>
> Though really, is SuperScripsit that much different from
>regular Scripsit?
>
> As I recall (haven't booted the Mod III/4 in nearly 7 years)
>regular Scripsit files were effectively just plain ASCII -- the
>formatting being done via a variant of "dot commands". Should be
>quite easy to write conversion macro's to handle them (at least, it
>would be on my Amiga since all my word-processors and most of my
>editors support ARexx interfaces).

SuperScripsit actually was a completely different program; its only
connection to the original Scripsit was the name. 'Super' didn't use dot
commands, from what I remember, and attempted to do as much onscreen
formatting as the display permitted. It also had a remarkably whacked file
format that gave up efficiency in exchange for a virtual memory system, of
sorts, that let it handle documents up to about 200K in size.

> {Beware of old CS majors trained on off-beat equipment -- we
>recognize elegance in an OS! Both the TRS-80 and the Amiga were
>chosen for the OS capabilities, which outperformed any of their peers
>of the time}

I bet you didn't expect a non-flippant reply to this, did you? Corollary:

Foxy

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Sep 17, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/17/96
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On 11 Sep 1996, Rivercoon wrote:

> Will this be issue 4 or volume 2 , issue 1?

Wasn't Zoomorphica sort of unoffically issue #4 ? :)
But hey.. if Bart has anything to do with it, I'll believe another issue
is happening when I actually see it :)
(*grins and hugs the fops*)


/------------------------------------------------------
---Foxy!--- / "We must infiltrate, integrate with humans, using our
kp...@coventry.ac.uk / superior talents to gain control of their politics,
fo...@tigerden.com / their media of communication, their legends, their
Artist, furry fan / beliefs, so that, when the times comes, they will have
and Vulpophile! / been seduced to the acceptance of the inevitable, the
-----------------/ era of foxes."


Amara

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Sep 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/18/96
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How do I get information about this? Someone told me to email someone
about it, but the email addy I have is wrong. :)

Amy

"We are all in the gutter.. but some of us are looking at the stars"
-Oscar Wilde
http://rat.org/amara ap...@cleo.murdoch.edu.au :)
Furry code: 1.2.. FCFpf3adm A+++$ C++ D H++ M++ P++ R T+++ W Z+++ Sf#
RLS*/A a c++dblw d- e++ f++ h+ i+ wf p- sf#


Paul Bennett

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Sep 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/19/96
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In article <wulfraedD...@netcom.com>, wulf...@kd6mog.netcom.com (Dennis Lee Bieber) writes:
> On 17 Sep 1996 02:36:23 GMT in alt.fan.furry,
> Watts Martin (mi...@agii.solluna.org) declaimed:
>
> >

> > I bet you didn't expect a non-flippant reply to this, did you? Corollary:
> > beware of part-time writers and Z80 hackers who actively used TRS-80 word
> > processors until 1991. (For the record, I used AllWrite under NEWDOS/80,
> > and later, LeScript under LS-DOS.)
>

> I will admit to being a bit surprised by it... and pleased...
>
> --
> > ============================================================ <
> > wulf...@netcom.com | Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber KD6MOG <
> > news.dm.net | Bestiaria Support Staff <
> > ============================================================ <
> > PGP key: Finger wulf...@netcom.com <
> > Home Page: ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/wu/wulfraed/wulfraed.htm <

"vi" under linux! (GRYN)
Paul

Watts Martin

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Sep 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/19/96
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In article <Pine.SOL.3.91.960918053944.26777B-100000@cleo>, Amara wrote:
>How do I get information about this? Someone told me to email someone
>about it, but the email addy I have is wrong. :)

You can get it from the web page at http://www.mythagoras.com. If that
doesn't work, you can send mail to me at mi...@mythagoras.com, or if that
bounces (some name servers seem to disbelieve mythagoras.com exists), to
mi...@solluna.org.


Pascal Quentin Porcupine

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Sep 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/19/96
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ben...@cise.ufl.edu (Paul Bennett) wrote:

>"vi" under linux! (GRYN)

vi forever. :)

---
quantum porcupine, coder, musician | that which is, is not
and porcupine. mailto:jsh...@nmsu.edu | that which can, can not
http://infinity.beve.blacksburg.va.us/~porcpine | that which does, does not


Watts Martin

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Sep 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/23/96
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In article <51rbkc$2...@no-names.nerdc.ufl.edu>, Paul Bennett wrote:
>"vi" under linux! (GRYN)
>Paul

Anyone who has the patience to write a story with vi gets points for
chutzpah, at the very least. And hopefully a discount on Caldera's port of
WordPerfect.


Kim

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Sep 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/23/96
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In article <525uj8$r...@bonkers.taronga.com>,
Peter da Silva <pe...@taronga.com> wrote:

>In article <524r04$mat@moon>, Watts Martin <mi...@agii.solluna.org> wrote:
>>Anyone who has the patience to write a story with vi gets points for
>>chutzpah, at the very least.
[deleted]
>Until someone gives me a word processor that implements ALL the vi commands
>I'm sticking with it.

Hear hear.

Kim
http://www.solluna.org/~bookwyrm/
book...@solluna.org

David G. Bell

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Sep 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/23/96
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In article <524r04$mat@moon> mi...@agii.solluna.org "Watts Martin" writes:

> In article <51rbkc$2...@no-names.nerdc.ufl.edu>, Paul Bennett wrote:
> >"vi" under linux! (GRYN)
> >Paul
>

> Anyone who has the patience to write a story with vi gets points for

> chutzpah, at the very least. And hopefully a discount on Caldera's port of
> WordPerfect.

When I'm fiddling with Linux, my default editor uses the basic Wordstar
commands. And how much more editing control do folks really need?

But I hear some folks write their web pages with vi. I used the MS-DOS
edit program.

--
David G. Bell -- Farmer, SF Fan, Filker, Furry, and Punslinger..

Jenora Feur

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Sep 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/23/96
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In article <524r04$mat@moon>, Watts Martin <mi...@agii.solluna.org> wrote:
>Anyone who has the patience to write a story with vi gets points for
>chutzpah, at the very least. And hopefully a discount on Caldera's port of
>WordPerfect.

I resemble that remark.

I happen to _like_ vi. Of course, I've been using it for over ten
years now, have memorized most of the basic capabilities, and know how
to make it sit up and beg when I need to pull off a particular stunt,
like converting a series of words in quotes to a bulleted list without
changing the words themselves. Then I run it though LaTeX for a fancy
display.

Last couple of stories I sent to you were written with vi. Actually
I think it's vim on this system.

---------------------------+---------------------------------------------------
Bryan Feir VA3GBF|"This Santa Claus business is played out. It's a
br...@sgl.ists.ca | sneaking, underhand method, and the sooner it's
jen...@istar.ca | exposed the better." -- Stephen Leacock
---------------------------+---------------------------------------------------

Benjamin Keen

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Sep 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/23/96
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jen...@istar.ca (Jenora Feur) writes:

> I resemble that remark.

> I happen to _like_ vi. Of course, I've been using it for over ten
>years now, have memorized most of the basic capabilities, and know how
>to make it sit up and beg when I need to pull off a particular stunt,
>like converting a series of words in quotes to a bulleted list without
>changing the words themselves. Then I run it though LaTeX for a fancy
>display.

> Last couple of stories I sent to you were written with vi. Actually
>I think it's vim on this system.

As a user of emacs I think it's only fair to promote my editor of
choice in this thread. If one's going to use a huge program, it might
as well do everything; it also evens out keyboad wear in that one gets
to use most of the keys. 8) And it's quite nice to have a mode
especially built for whatever one is doing.

-BJK

obFurry, the flavour of emacs I use also has an animal attached.

obMythagoras, could y'all take submissions in TeX or LaTeX? Pretty please?

Paul Bennett

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Sep 24, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/24/96
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The Ole Fox grins:
You mean there are other people out there who like using "vi"!!! Oh
goodygoodygoody!!! I am about in the same boat. Been using it for
about 11 years. Works for me. Of course I am also known to still use
a slide rule too.

"Vim" ay. Wouldn't be running linux, would you?

Yes, I am familiar with emacs and I am aware it is quite powerful, but what
the hey, vi works and I am familiar with it. I do use WordPerfect for some
things.

As an aside to the puzzled. Wordperfect and similiar programs are word
processors. They combine the formatting, fonts, and numerous other bits
and pieces for preparing and printing finished documents. OTOH, things
like DOS Edlin and *nix vi are strictly text editors. If you desire
things like different fonts and styles and other stuff like that then
you have to embed commands in the document. Then you feed it into a
formatter like latex or Troff and on to your printer or file.

I use vi for my writing primarily so I am dealing strictly with a text
file. If I am posting a story to A.F.F. (and the day approaches... slowly)
then I am going to want to put it up as a text file. That way the reader
doesn't have to worry about whether his or her document viewer can handle it.
Also, most word processors, like wordperfect, can input a text file and
convert it to their format, which, if I submit to some place like Mythogaras
I might wind up doing.

In regards to "emacs" vs. "vi", you ought to see some of the horrified
looks I get out of some of the local systems people. "You're still using
WHAT!!"

Paul
(Softwarewise, the Jurassic Fox)

Dennis Lee Bieber

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Sep 24, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/24/96
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On 24 Sep 1996 13:22:20 GMT in alt.fan.furry,
Paul Bennett (ben...@cise.ufl.edu) declaimed:

>
> In regards to "emacs" vs. "vi", you ought to see some of the horrified
> looks I get out of some of the local systems people. "You're still using
> WHAT!!"
>

<snicker> I'm still using EDT on the VAXs... Used to use
SOS until DEC removed it (back in the days of VMS 3 I believe).

Heck, I even had the editor that came with Alcor Pascal
reprogrammed to emulate the main EDT keypad operations -- on my
TRS-80.

--
> ============================================================ <
> wulf...@netcom.com | Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber KD6MOG <

> Finger for PGP key | Bestiaria Support Staff <
> ============================================================ <
> Bestiaria Home Page: http://beastie.dm.net/ <
> Home Page: ftp://ftp.netcom.com/pub/wu/wulfraed/wulfraed.htm <

? the platypus {aka David Formosa}

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Sep 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/25/96
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q...@antistatic.com (Pascal Quentin Porcupine) writes:


>vi forever. :)

emacs, I mean what else do you need.


--
Please excuse my spelling as I am agraphic. dfor...@st.nepean.uws.edu.au
Never trust a country with more peaple then sheep. /\ /\ /\
Save the ABC Is $0.08 per day too much to pay? ( X X )
Its lucky to be ducky. Honk if you love geese. \/ \/ \/

Watts Martin

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Sep 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/25/96
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In article <525uj8$r...@bonkers.taronga.com>, Peter da Silva wrote:
>In article <524r04$mat@moon>, Watts Martin <mi...@agii.solluna.org> wrote:
>I've used Word Pervert, and Micro$oft Word, and Weirdstar, and various other
>What You See Is All You Get tools... and they're all too bloody tied down
>to mice or special keys or weird hard-to-remember control sequences... and
>none of them have the functionality at your fingertips VI gives you.

The word processor I use now, Nota Bene, doesn't use the mouse at all. It
may have some weird control sequences, but, frankly, so does "vi". The
"weirdness" of an interface depends on how used to it you are.

If vi had integrated printer support, Nota Bene's "Orbis" dynamic text
retrieval database system, a redlining mode, outline processing, style
sheets, and all the little "weird control sequences" that make using Nota
Bene so easy--from being able to press ^? over a word to have it instantly
check its spelling because I didn't think it "looked right," to a Unix-like
CLI with command history, to modeless one-keystroke block defining,
deleting, copying, moving and transposing of text by word, phrase, sentence
or paragraph--well, then maybe I'd use vi as a word processor. As it is, vi
and jed (my favorite Unix editor) can do things Nota Bene can't, but when it
comes to story editing rather than general text file editing or programming,
those things aren't as useful to me as the things NB can do that vi/jed
can't.

Again, if someone wants to write the Great <fill in nationality> Novel using
a combination of vi, ispell, and LaTeX, and they're perfectly happy with it,
well... then they're happy, and that's important. At least some of us who
*wouldn't* be happy with that may have reasons other than being brainwashed
by Microsoft, though.


Watts Martin

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Sep 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/25/96
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In article <52a2hh$1...@bonkers.taronga.com>, Peter da Silva wrote:
>In article <527l5c$9...@mathstat.usc.edu>,

>Benjamin Keen <ke...@mathstat.usc.edu> wrote:
>>to use most of the keys. 8) And it's quite nice to have a mode
>>especially built for whatever one is doing.
>
>So you're going to do an Emacs muck client?

Too late - that's been done. Lumpy was using it, and I think it's available
at tcp.com somewhere.


D.J. Green

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Sep 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/25/96
to

In article <dformosa....@lancelot.st.nepean.uws.edu.au>,

? the platypus {aka David Formosa} <dfor...@st.nepean.uws.edu.au> wrote:
>q...@antistatic.com (Pascal Quentin Porcupine) writes:
>
>
>>vi forever. :)
>
>emacs, I mean what else do you need.

Emacs, and 32 megs of memory, and 128 megs of swap, and 18 megs of disk
space, and...

Why does your text editor need to have a mode to wash your dishes for you?
Just say 'vi'.
--
"Big Bird meets Salvador Dali has been brought to you by the numbers L and
), and by the letter 3."

Benjamin Keen

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Sep 26, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/26/96
to

nebu...@best.com (D.J. Green) writes:

>Emacs, and 32 megs of memory, and 128 megs of swap, and 18 megs of disk
>space, and...

>Why does your text editor need to have a mode to wash your dishes for you?
>Just say 'vi'.

Bah. The command mode/editing mode business is a leftover from 300
bps terminals. And you've got emacs confused with Word 7. In truth,
there's a benefit to using an obscure editor in that noone ever wants
to come and use one's computer.

It's like having an RPN calculator in high school; noone ever borrows
it because they get stuck looking for the equals key.

-BJK


Chris Baird

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Sep 27, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/27/96
to

Benjamin Keen,
>> [...] to use most of the keys. 8) And it's quite nice to have a

>> mode especially built for whatever one is doing.

Peter da Silva,


> So you're going to do an Emacs muck client?

Several have already been done (f...@ftp.cis.ohio-state.edu:
/pub/gnu/emacs/elisp-archive/games/) ... and would you believe
tale [@uunet] wrote an IRC mode/client?

--
Chris,,
I want Iran back on the Internet.

Elf Sternberg

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Sep 27, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/27/96
to

In article <52blik$ls8@moon>
mi...@agii.solluna.org (Watts Martin) writes:

>The word processor I use now, Nota Bene, doesn't use the mouse at all. It
>may have some weird control sequences, but, frankly, so does "vi". The
>"weirdness" of an interface depends on how used to it you are.

Perhaps I should make some mention here. All of my USENET work
is done in vi. I even have an implementation of vi for DOS so that I
don't have to learn a new ASCII editor in order to continue to
participate in this grand discussion. I'm a big fan of the ASCII editor
that came with Telemate, and although I sometimes use it for short
missives, usually I shell out completely and use vi. I use vi at work
and have written hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of software
using vi.

On the other hand, the Journal Entries, Aimee', and all the
other stories were written in Word For Windows. I don't have much bad
to say about Word; it's a strong, reliable word processor that looks
like any other word processor. Mine is heavily customized, as are most
of the people I know who write professionally. Key definitions have
changed, WordBasic scripts have been added, and so on, to make our lives
easier. The Journal Entries for the Web are actually generated with a
WordBasic script I've written (JEforHTML) and the ones for usenet have
a similar script (JEforUSENET), and to do all of them at once I have
JEMany.

No, Word isn't perfect. In fact, it feels clunky to me and it
consistently highlights Steve Job's observation about MicroSoft: "They
never do anything because it's beautiful. They never have any
inspiration there about *what* a program should do. We get different
fonts and typesettings from beautiful books and because we want to make
beauty in the future. MicroSoft just does it because it's worth money,
not because it inspires them." But it works, and after several hours of
assessment and re-arrangment, Word does what I want better and faster
than anything else I currently have available to me.

Elf !!!

Elf Sternberg Given an opportunity to assist with crime,
e...@halcyon.com I would do so. - Alan Dershowitz
Public key available http://www.halcyon.com/elf/index.html

Chris Baird

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Sep 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/28/96
to

>> emacs, I mean what else do you need.

D J Green,


> Emacs, and 32 megs of memory, and 128 megs of swap, and 18 megs
> of disk space, and...
> Why does your text editor need to have a mode to wash your dishes
> for you? Just say 'vi'.

Feh. I because enlighted to the glory of Emacs on a Xenix 386sx16
w/ 3M of core and a 40M SCSI drive. Betcha the size of the
executible was smaller than any statically-linked vi clone today..

a
--
Chris,, Just brushing up on my ed skills, ma'am.
.

Watts Martin

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Sep 29, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/29/96
to

In article <52h68v$o...@news1.halcyon.com>, Elf Sternberg wrote:
> Perhaps I should make some mention here. All of my USENET work
>is done in vi. I even have an implementation of vi for DOS so that I
>don't have to learn a new ASCII editor in order to continue to
>participate in this grand discussion. [ ... ] I use vi at work

>and have written hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of software
>using vi.
>
> On the other hand, the Journal Entries, Aimee', and all the
>other stories were written in Word For Windows. I don't have much bad
>to say about Word; it's a strong, reliable word processor that looks
>like any other word processor. Mine is heavily customized, as are most
>of the people I know who write professionally.
> ... But [Word] works, and after several hours of

>assessment and re-arrangment, Word does what I want better and faster
>than anything else I currently have available to me.

That's kind of an illustration of my view -- a text editor and a word
processor aren't identical. Personally I still prefer jed as a text editor
over vi, but that's partially because I *like* WordStar's command set and I
can make jed do that (without losing all the emacs-like power it has). Word
is my favorite Windows-based word processor, and there are some things I
like about it more than Nota Bene -- most notably WordBasic, which is much
easier to program than NB's arcane XPL system, and its redlining system,
which is great for editing other people's stuff.

A word processor's redlining system probably *isn't* that useful for source
code and ASCII text, but vi's ability to run marked text through an external
program and capture that program's output, as powerful as it might be, is
not something I envision will help me write the next Mika & Revar story.
Both vi and NB can be used for fiction writing and editing source code, but
that doesn't mean each one does equally well at both.


Chris Baird

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Sep 30, 1996, 3:00:00 AM9/30/96
to

Chris Baird,
>> Feh. I [became] enlighted to the glory of Emacs on a Xenix

>> 386sx16 w/ 3M of core and a 40M SCSI drive. Betcha the size of
>> the executible was smaller than any statically-linked vi clone
>> today..

Peter da Silva,
> Real GNU emacs or one of the clones? Some of them were quite
> small, but didn't have the kitchen sink commands.

The Real GNU. It would have had to been, since I tried GNUS-3 as a
newsreader. (Now loading that in /did/ thrash the 3 Meg machine[1]--
it took about 18 minutes to get into the Newsgroups buffer of about
40 groups. Ouchie.)

--
Chris,,
[1] attempted at 4am in the morning-- didn't want the sysadmin
noticing, did I?

Major Matt Mason

unread,
Oct 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM10/2/96
to

In article <52mctb$eru@moon>, mi...@agii.solluna.org (Watts Martin) wrote:

> code and ASCII text, but vi's ability to run marked text through an external
> program and capture that program's output, as powerful as it might be, is
> not something I envision will help me write the next Mika & Revar story.

Say, when ARE we gonna see that next story? (evyl grynne)

-MMM-

Watts Martin

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Oct 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM10/3/96
to

Good question, isn't it? I do have a vague idea of what happens in it.
(About five years ago I started a third story which a few people have seen
the opening to, but I don't think the new one will have anything to do with
it.) Given my somewhat abysmal performance in getting new chapters of "In
Our Image" out, I'm flatly refusing to even guess when this new bat story
will actually happen, but when it does, it will be sent to YARF!.

-- and speaking of "In Our Image," since mentioning it will be tacit
encouragement for folks to ask: it's being worked on again, after a longer
hiatus than I really should have let happen. I'm more sympathetic now to
Steve Gallacci's long delays relating to "Albedo" than I used to be. The
catch is that I've been informed continuing to serialize it in YARF! may
make selling it later very difficult -- I'd been assuming fanzines were
different from pro publications, but as it turns out, rights are rights, and
when a story -- or novel -- appears in YARF! first, YARF!'s been given first
serial rights. If first serial rights are what the big publisher wants, you
can't give it to 'em.

There will be more of "Image" in YARF! (providing I write something new on
it that I actually like, of course), but I don't know how much of it, or
what relation it'll have to the expected novel. I may decide I really can't
turn it into a novel at all (writing it has been a learning experience, and
on the whole not a pleasant one), in which case what appears in YARF! will
be it. We'll see. (I hope.)

-- Regardless of that, though, there will be more Ranea stories appearing in
YARF!. It'll probably be the only place they appear in print from now on,
with eventual followups on the "Belfry" site if Revar is interested. (And
if I become famous enough to interest a paperback publisher in doing a
collection of them, I wouldn't mind that, of course.)


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