CBG Furry Issue

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Robert Alley

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Apr 9, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/9/00
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If you're going to a comic store in the next few days, you might want to
pick up Comics Buyer's Guide #1379 (4/21/00) which focuses on
furry/anthropomorphic comics. The cover's by Terrie Smith, & there's an
overview by Fred Patten, a profile of Shanda Fantasy Arts & an interview
with Terrie Smith. Plus, there's a whole slew of furry-related
advertisements (publishers & vendors) as well.

furplay

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Apr 9, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/9/00
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I hope they bothered to make coverage on the works of folks like Eric
Schwartz and James Hardiman, who are a couple of the REAL "movers and
shakers" in the genre.

furplay

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Apr 10, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/10/00
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Robert Alley wrote:

> 'Fraid the only mention of Schwartz is that of the reprints for "Sabrina
> Online" offered by United Publications. Patten's article talks more
> about publications & the formation of the fandom than the artists
> themselves. Mostly when someone is mentioned, it's in conjunction with
> some publication/zine he's associated with.


Not a very accurate portrayal of what furry fandom is all about then, is
it? There's a lot more talent out there than just Fred Patten and Terrie
Smith (Good God please, I sure hope so). Watch what happens when a new
issue of "Associated Student Bodies" comes out and see what I mean.

Oh well, considerring how the CBG *used* to regard furrydom, this is
still an improvement.

Robert Alley

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Apr 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/11/00
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Charles Melville

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Apr 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/11/00
to

furplay wrote:

> Robert Alley wrote:


> >
> > furplay wrote:
>
> > >
> > > I hope they bothered to make coverage on the works of folks like Eric
> > > Schwartz and James Hardiman, who are a couple of the REAL "movers and
> > > shakers" in the genre.
> >
> > 'Fraid the only mention of Schwartz is that of the reprints for "Sabrina
> > Online" offered by United Publications. Patten's article talks more
> > about publications & the formation of the fandom than the artists
> > themselves. Mostly when someone is mentioned, it's in conjunction with
> > some publication/zine he's associated with.
>

> Not a very accurate portrayal of what furry fandom is all about then, is
> it?

Considering that the article -isn't- about the fandom itself, per se, but
about the furry publications, that should hardly come as a shock.

> There's a lot more talent out there than just Fred Patten and Terrie
> Smith (Good God please, I sure hope so).

And the article does touch on quite a few of them, such as the Curtises,
Radio, Reed Waller, Stan Sakai, etc. From appearances, the article was designed
to touch on the professional side of Furrydom, in order to conjunct with the
overall comics market, to whom the newspaper is intended. Besides, you can only
name just so many people, or give each them just so much space to list their
accomplishments. If there was more attention given to the Curtises, Shanda Arts,
or Terrie Smith, then it must be remembered that it was the Curtises who made the
effort in the first place to get furry books spotlighted at all, and their work,
as well as Terrie's, is very much a strong and noteable furry presence on the
mainstream comic stands.

> Watch what happens when a new
> issue of "Associated Student Bodies" comes out and see what I mean.
>
> Oh well, considerring how the CBG *used* to regard furrydom, this is
> still an improvement.

Very much so, and Mike and Carole, as well as Fred, deserve a big round of
thanks for making it happen.

(Nitpicking can wait for two more months.)

--
-Chuck Melville-
http://www.zipcon.net/~cpam/index.htm

bevnsag

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Apr 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/11/00
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furplay wrote:
>
> Robert Alley wrote:
> >
> > furplay wrote:
> > >

> > > Robert Alley wrote:
> > > >
> > > > If you're going to a comic store in the next few days, you might want to
> > > > pick up Comics Buyer's Guide #1379 (4/21/00) which focuses on
> > > > furry/anthropomorphic comics. The cover's by Terrie Smith, & there's an
> > > > overview by Fred Patten, a profile of Shanda Fantasy Arts & an interview
> > > > with Terrie Smith. Plus, there's a whole slew of furry-related
> > > > advertisements (publishers & vendors) as well.
> > >

> > > I hope they bothered to make coverage on the works of folks like Eric
> > > Schwartz and James Hardiman, who are a couple of the REAL "movers and
> > > shakers" in the genre.
> >
> > 'Fraid the only mention of Schwartz is that of the reprints for "Sabrina
> > Online" offered by United Publications. Patten's article talks more
> > about publications & the formation of the fandom than the artists
> > themselves. Mostly when someone is mentioned, it's in conjunction with
> > some publication/zine he's associated with.
>
> Not a very accurate portrayal of what furry fandom is all about then, is

> it? There's a lot more talent out there than just Fred Patten and Terrie
> Smith (Good God please, I sure hope so). Watch what happens when a new


> issue of "Associated Student Bodies" comes out and see what I mean.
>
> Oh well, considerring how the CBG *used* to regard furrydom, this is
> still an improvement.

You must also remember that Schwartz is a somewhat isolated sub-set of
the genre and Hardiman, though somewhat popular, is little more than
another resent player in an increasingly crowded field. Fred's article
was basically an overview of the biz and did not go into detail over all
the sub-sets and factions of the fandom.

furplay

unread,
Apr 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/11/00
to

Charles Melville wrote:
>
> >
> > Not a very accurate portrayal of what furry fandom is all about then, is
> > it?
>

> Considering that the article -isn't- about the fandom itself, per se, but
> about the furry publications, that should hardly come as a shock.
>

Furrydom and it's business aspects are still nearly one and the same (at
least for now, anyway). Even the classic "FIJASOI" belies a reliance on
the fandom itself.

> > There's a lot more talent out there than just Fred Patten and Terrie
> > Smith (Good God please, I sure hope so).
>

> And the article does touch on quite a few of them, such as the Curtises,
> Radio, Reed Waller, Stan Sakai, etc. From appearances, the article was designed
> to touch on the professional side of Furrydom, in order to conjunct with the
> overall comics market, to whom the newspaper is intended. Besides, you can only
> name just so many people, or give each them just so much space to list their
> accomplishments. If there was more attention given to the Curtises, Shanda Arts,
> or Terrie Smith, then it must be remembered that it was the Curtises who made the
> effort in the first place to get furry books spotlighted at all, and their work,
> as well as Terrie's, is very much a strong and noteable furry presence on the
> mainstream comic stands.
>

Well, I hope it does'nt become something like one big proverbial
infomercial made by and for one publisher's POV.

> > Watch what happens when a new
> > issue of "Associated Student Bodies" comes out and see what I mean.
> >
> > Oh well, considerring how the CBG *used* to regard furrydom, this is
> > still an improvement.
>

> Very much so, and Mike and Carole, as well as Fred, deserve a big round of
> thanks for making it happen.

If it helps to disloge the "mutant fetish" the comix industry has, I'm
all for it.

furplay

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Apr 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/11/00
to

bevnsag wrote:
>
> > > >
> > > > I hope they bothered to make coverage on the works of folks like Eric
> > > > Schwartz and James Hardiman, who are a couple of the REAL "movers and
> > > > shakers" in the genre.

> >


> > Oh well, considerring how the CBG *used* to regard furrydom, this is
> > still an improvement.
>

> You must also remember that Schwartz is a somewhat isolated sub-set of
> the genre and Hardiman, though somewhat popular, is little more than
> another resent player in an increasingly crowded field.

Not exactly so. Even if furrydom did'nt exist, he still made a prominent
name for himself in Amiga circles and could be even moreso today if he
started dabbling in Shockwave.

And of course, you're no slouch yourself Steve, seeing that might be the
only featured artist from the days of the "Funny Animal" issue of Comics
Scene (or was it Comics Interview?) that's still going at it.

Ross Sauer

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Apr 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/11/00
to
Charles Melville wrote in message <38F29138...@zipcon.com>...

>
>
>furplay wrote:
>
>> Robert Alley wrote:
>> >
>> > furplay wrote:
>>
>> > >
>> > > I hope they bothered to make coverage on the works of folks like Eric
>> > > Schwartz and James Hardiman, who are a couple of the REAL "movers and
>> > > shakers" in the genre.
>> >
>> > 'Fraid the only mention of Schwartz is that of the reprints for
"Sabrina
>> > Online" offered by United Publications. Patten's article talks more
>> > about publications & the formation of the fandom than the artists
>> > themselves. Mostly when someone is mentioned, it's in conjunction with
>> > some publication/zine he's associated with.
>>
>> Not a very accurate portrayal of what furry fandom is all about then, is
>> it?
>
> Considering that the article -isn't- about the fandom itself, per se,
but
>about the furry publications, that should hardly come as a shock.
>
>> There's a lot more talent out there than just Fred Patten and Terrie
>> Smith (Good God please, I sure hope so).
>
> And the article does touch on quite a few of them, such as the
Curtises,
>Radio, Reed Waller, Stan Sakai, etc. From appearances, the article was
designed
>to touch on the professional side of Furrydom, in order to conjunct with
the
>overall comics market, to whom the newspaper is intended.

Well, over 10 years ago one of these magazines (I don't remember which one)
that was about comic books did an entire article on "Omaha the Cat Dancer"
complete with illustrations.
That's where I first heard of Omaha, and face it, it was love at first
sight. <G>
They had one picture of Omaha, wearing only a large bubble I'm still looking
for.

BTW, in the CBG issue were any of the on-line comics besides Sabrina
mentioned? Such as Kevin & Kell?

Ross Sauer
pa...@bytehead.com

furplay

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Apr 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/11/00
to

Mathue wrote:
>
> In article <38F26E4D...@novia.net>, furplay <fur...@novia.net>


> wrote:
>
> > Not a very accurate portrayal of what furry fandom is all about then, is

> > it? There's a lot more talent out there than just Fred Patten and Terrie
> > Smith (Good God please, I sure hope so). Watch what happens when a new


> > issue of "Associated Student Bodies" comes out and see what I mean.
> >

> > Oh well, considerring how the CBG *used* to regard furrydom, this is
> > still an improvement.
>

> Perhaps, IF CBG was about fandoms. It's aimed at the professional
> comics market and is less concerned with whatever fandoms might
> surround a group of titles. Space considerations always leave some
> material on the cutting room floor, even furry fandom stuff :)
>

But always remember, it's the fandoms that support the industry with
it's $$$$. Once an artist starts to lose sight of that, he/she starts to
lose business.

Sometimes fandom is MORE than just a mere "source of income".

Robert Alley

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Apr 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/11/00
to

Ross Sauer wrote:
>
>
> BTW, in the CBG issue were any of the on-line comics besides Sabrina
> mentioned? Such as Kevin & Kell?
>
> Ross Sauer
> pa...@bytehead.com

Ozy & Millie (which is compared to "Peanuts") and Newshounds are talked
about, right after K&K when the article turns to the phenomenon of
Internet-only comic strips. Even Sluggy Freelance & Freefall are
mentioned, & they even give a link to the Bestiaria site
(http://beastie.dm.net), which presumably has them (I haven't been there myself).

Richard Chandler - WA Resident

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Apr 11, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/11/00
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In article <38F3D34D...@home.net>, Patrick Keith <pak...@home.net>
writes:
> BONE was also included in the this listing since it has talking
> animals and a dragon as regular characters. The "Furry Fandom", as it
> is, probably doesn't consider this to be a furry title in their
> definition. I didn't see any copies of BONE being sold at ConFurence
> this weekend either. No one can argue that this title is exceptional
> in its story and execution and is a first rate read, whatever its genre


Actually, I had a few of my duplicate issues for sale at my table both at CF
and FC, and I'm not sure what was in Al's boxes under the table.

Oddly, Akira was the most sought-after title coming out of those boxes.


--
The greatest tragedy is that the same species that achieved space flight,
a cure for polio, and the transistor, is also featured nightly on COPS.
-- Richard Chandler
Spammer Warning: Washington State Law now provides civil penalties for UCE.


tamar_...@my-deja.com

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Apr 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/12/00
to
In article <38F2C550...@novia.net>,
fur...@NOSPAMDAMMIT.novia.net wrote:

>
>
> Charles Melville wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > Not a very accurate portrayal of what furry fandom is all about
then, is
> > > it?
> >
> > Considering that the article -isn't- about the fandom itself,
per se, but
> > about the furry publications, that should hardly come as a shock.
> >
>
> Furrydom and it's business aspects are still nearly one and the same
(at
> least for now, anyway). Even the classic "FIJASOI" belies a reliance
on
> the fandom itself.

True, but like he said this is CBG, not the FurryFandom weekly (though
I do miss that one online magazine which focused on anthro stuff).
Regular comic buyers could care less about hearing about the "fandom"
since to most, the "fandom" simply includes all comic book readers. It
was probably geared more towards the companies that produce
anthropomorphic comics and the comics they produce, which is great
advertisement for those companies and creators. Trying to attract more
outside fans can only help everyone in the business cause antho
publishers can't survive on just the "fandom" alone.

>
> > > There's a lot more talent out there than just Fred Patten and
Terrie
> > > Smith (Good God please, I sure hope so).
> >

> > And the article does touch on quite a few of them, such as the
Curtises,
> > Radio, Reed Waller, Stan Sakai, etc. From appearances, the article
was designed
> > to touch on the professional side of Furrydom, in order to conjunct
with the

> > overall comics market, to whom the newspaper is intended. Besides,
you can only
> > name just so many people, or give each them just so much space to
list their
> > accomplishments. If there was more attention given to the
Curtises, Shanda Arts,
> > or Terrie Smith, then it must be remembered that it was the
Curtises who made the
> > effort in the first place to get furry books spotlighted at all,
and their work,
> > as well as Terrie's, is very much a strong and noteable furry
presence on the
> > mainstream comic stands.
> >
>
> Well, I hope it does'nt become something like one big proverbial
> infomercial made by and for one publisher's POV.
>

Hey, after all, they did initiate the interview and it's cool that a
mainstream pub like CBG would even consider doing one in the first
place. The more of a spotlight is shown on a couple the better for
all. If it wasn't for an article I read in the old mag Comic Scene on
Omaha I'd have never gotten interested in seeking out books like
Albedo, later Furrlough, and finally drawing the comics myself.
You gotta start with a snowball before you get a giant snowboulder.

> > > Watch what happens when a new
> > > issue of "Associated Student Bodies" comes out and see what I
mean.
> > >
> > > Oh well, considerring how the CBG *used* to regard furrydom, this
is
> > > still an improvement.
> >

> > Very much so, and Mike and Carole, as well as Fred, deserve a
big round of
> > thanks for making it happen.
>
> If it helps to disloge the "mutant fetish" the comix industry has, I'm
> all for it.
>

Agreed. Any outside coverage the anthro market can get can only
benefit us all towards the continuous production of the material that,
as you correctly stated, feeds the fandom and visa versa. Now, let's
start a letter writing campaign to Wizard "the guide to comics" for
some coverage!

--
Ebony Leopard
http://www.yerf.com/howashaw
http://www.redpanda.com/howart


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

tamar_...@my-deja.com

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Apr 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/12/00
to
In article <LvHI4.1081$5b3.3...@homer.alpha.net>,

"Ross Sauer" <pa...@bytehead.com> wrote:
> Charles Melville wrote in message <38F29138...@zipcon.com>...
> >
> >
> >furplay wrote:
> >
> >> Robert Alley wrote:
> >> >
> >> > furplay wrote:
> >>
> >> > >
> >> > > I hope they bothered to make coverage on the works of folks
like Eric
> >> > > Schwartz and James Hardiman, who are a couple of the
REAL "movers and
> >> > > shakers" in the genre.
> >> >
> >> > 'Fraid the only mention of Schwartz is that of the reprints for
> "Sabrina
> >> > Online" offered by United Publications. Patten's article talks
more
> >> > about publications & the formation of the fandom than the artists
> >> > themselves. Mostly when someone is mentioned, it's in
conjunction with
> >> > some publication/zine he's associated with.
> >>
> >> Not a very accurate portrayal of what furry fandom is all about
then, is
> >> it?
> >
> > Considering that the article -isn't- about the fandom itself,
per se,
> but
> >about the furry publications, that should hardly come as a shock.
> >
> >> There's a lot more talent out there than just Fred Patten and
Terrie
> >> Smith (Good God please, I sure hope so).
> >
> > And the article does touch on quite a few of them, such as the
> Curtises,
> >Radio, Reed Waller, Stan Sakai, etc. From appearances, the article
was
> designed
> >to touch on the professional side of Furrydom, in order to conjunct
with
> the
> >overall comics market, to whom the newspaper is intended.
>
> Well, over 10 years ago one of these magazines (I don't remember
which one)
> that was about comic books did an entire article on "Omaha the Cat
Dancer"
> complete with illustrations.
> That's where I first heard of Omaha, and face it, it was love at first
> sight. <G>
> They had one picture of Omaha, wearing only a large bubble I'm still
looking
> for.

HA! See, I wasn't the only one that saw that. It was called Comic
Scene and given the time I probably could find my copy and tell what
year and issue number it was. That one also debuted the roughs for the
yet aired Tiny Toons.
Funny thing is I wouldn't have been able to even buy a copy of Omaha at
the time since I was around 12 or something, but it was the first time
I had ever heard of animal characters being used in a more serious way.
That was also my first time seeing "Anthropomorphic" or funny animal
comics outside of DC's Captain Carrot.

Speaking of which, would you believe in this month's Wizard they have
Captain Carrot under the "Comics we can't believe they made" segment?

Patrick Keith

unread,
Apr 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/12/00
to
Comic Buyer's Guide is a trade magazine aimed at industry professionals,
much in the same way Variety is aimed at entertainment professionals. I
found Fred Patten's overview of the *history* of so-called furry or
anthropomorphic publications very insightful and informative. I was also
surprised when he contacted us to include information about our
publication ERNOR, as new as it is. The idea was to introduce an
otherwise obscure sub-genre of the general comic market to those unaware
of it's presence. Read Mark Evanier's article in the same issue and see
what I mean (if you don't know who ME is, ask and I'll give you a short
list of the stuff he's done).

BONE was also included in the this listing since it has talking animals
and a dragon as regular characters. The "Furry Fandom", as it is,
probably doesn't consider this to be a furry title in their definition.
I didn't see any copies of BONE being sold at ConFurence this weekend
either. No one can argue that this title is exceptional in its story and

execution and is a first rate read, whatever its genre.

I would personally like to thank the Comic Buyer's Guide and Fred Patten
for taking their time and the publication space to spotlight what's
going on and presenting it to other industry professionals in a positive
and professional manner. The more positive press and exposure anthro can
get will only serve to broaden its readership and expand the fan base it
already enjoys.

-- Try to find anything like that in Wizard-The Guide to Comics.

Pat (that Ernor guy)
--
Artist/Publisher
<http://members.home.net/pakage>
<http://members.home.net/mprints>

Ostrich

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Apr 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/12/00
to
furplay <fur...@novia.net> wrote:
>
> Even if furrydom did'nt exist, [Eric Schwartz] still made a prominent

> name for himself in Amiga circles and could be even moreso today if he
> started dabbling in Shockwave.
>
To keep the matter in perspective, one should recall that most
people probably aren't even aware of the Amiga's continued existance.
--
-Ostrich! <") http://www.furnation.com/ostrich

R Greg Older

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Apr 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/12/00
to

Mathue <mathu/e...@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:110420001124279121%mathu/e...@my-deja.com...

> In article <38F26E4D...@novia.net>, furplay <fur...@novia.net>
> wrote:
>
>
> > Not a very accurate portrayal of what furry fandom is all about then, is
> > it? There's a lot more talent out there than just Fred Patten and Terrie
> > Smith (Good God please, I sure hope so). Watch what happens when a new

> > issue of "Associated Student Bodies" comes out and see what I mean.
> >
> > Oh well, considerring how the CBG *used* to regard furrydom, this is
> > still an improvement.
>
> Perhaps, IF CBG was about fandoms. It's aimed at the professional
> comics market and is less concerned with whatever fandoms might
> surround a group of titles. Space considerations always leave some
> material on the cutting room floor, even furry fandom stuff :)
>
>
> --
> MT - Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
>
> 101010

You're right about that. In the letter I posted to Time Magazine about
internet comics, my references to "Sabrina Online", "Kevin&Kell",
"FreeFall", and "Supermegatopia" where cut out.
-Greg

furplay

unread,
Apr 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/12/00
to

R Greg Older wrote:
>
>
> You're right about that. In the letter I posted to Time Magazine about
> internet comics, my references to "Sabrina Online", "Kevin&Kell",
> "FreeFall", and "Supermegatopia" where cut out.
> -Greg

Well, we all know that AOL/Time/Warner/La Cosa Nostra Inc. sucks vast
amounts of big floppy donky dicks.

Robert Alley

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Apr 12, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/12/00
to

Patrick Keith wrote:
>
> Comic Buyer's Guide is a trade magazine aimed at industry professionals,
> much in the same way Variety is aimed at entertainment professionals. I
> found Fred Patten's overview of the *history* of so-called furry or
> anthropomorphic publications very insightful and informative. I was also
> surprised when he contacted us to include information about our
> publication ERNOR, as new as it is. The idea was to introduce an
> otherwise obscure sub-genre of the general comic market to those unaware
> of it's presence. Read Mark Evanier's article in the same issue and see
> what I mean (if you don't know who ME is, ask and I'll give you a short
> list of the stuff he's done).
>

Patten's overview is something he's been working on for quite some time;
this one's basically a revised version of an article that appeared in
Yarf! #46, & for all I know he's put out other versions of it elsewhere.

gbres...@my-deja.com

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Apr 13, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/13/00
to
In article <38F382DA...@novia.net>,
fur...@NOSPAMDAMMIT.novia.net wrote:

> But always remember, it's the fandoms that support the industry with
> it's $$$$. Once an artist starts to lose sight of that, he/she starts
to
> lose business.

> Sometimes fandom is MORE than just a mere "source of income".

As a long time fan (subscribed to my first fanzine in 1972), I certainly
would never argue that fandom is completely insignificant.... but...

Depending on what you mean by that word, your statement's veracity
changes. In my experience the primary source of income is a vastly
larger group that the people who identify themselves as "fans." This is
true whether you talk about furry fandom or trek fandom.

The Comic Buyer's Guide is a trade journal aimed at producers,
distributors, retailers and collectors of the entire comic industry. Its
focus will, understandably, be skewed toward that audience.

--Gene

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