Seeing Zappa live!

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MASTERRINGO

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Dec 8, 2000, 9:45:08 AM12/8/00
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Being only 24, I never got to ever see the man live.
Does anyone wanna tell what it was like to see the man in the flesh?

Stu Mark

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Dec 8, 2000, 10:18:39 AM12/8/00
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MASTERRINGO at maste...@aol.com wrote on 12/8/00 6:45 AM:

> Being only 24, I never got to ever see the man live.
> Does anyone wanna tell what it was like to see the man in the flesh?

Check out http://www.teleport.com/~rouse/fz/ for starters. This, of course,
is a link that I got from the fabulous list of links at
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~splat/links.html - which is now my new fave
rave on the 'net.

Stu
(who hopes everyone is having their best day ever)

NP: Deep Blue Day (over and over) by Brian Eno

Knut Skogstad

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Dec 8, 2000, 2:06:35 PM12/8/00
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He was much smaller than I thought.....

K

--
"Until I get mad I don't know my own brains"

Donald Duck


"MASTERRINGO" <maste...@aol.com> skrev i melding
news:20001208094508...@ng-ck1.aol.com...

MASTERRINGO

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Dec 8, 2000, 4:58:38 PM12/8/00
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>
>"You should have gone to his concerts while he was still alive."

Yes I should, but I only found the joys of Franks music in the early 90's a
year or two before he passed.
Also, I'm the UK - don't beleave Frank did anything here since the 88 tour
which I was not even awear of back then being 12!

Ron Spiegelhalter

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Dec 8, 2000, 8:01:51 PM12/8/00
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"Ville Kinnunen" <ville.k...@pp1.inet.fish> wrote...
> MASTERRINGO kirjoitti viestissä
<20001208094508...@ng-ck1.aol.com>...

> >Being only 24, I never got to ever see the man live.
> >Does anyone wanna tell what it was like to see the man in the flesh?
>
> Simple mathematics:
>
> 2000-24=1976
> 1993-1976=17
>
> You were seventeen when the guy died.
>
> Stand in front of a big mirror, point it with your index finger and say:

>
> "You should have gone to his concerts while he was still alive."

Bad math. He was only twelve when Frank toured last. How many of us were
into Zappa (and able to go to his shows when we felt like it) when we were
twelve?

ron


MASTERRINGO

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Dec 8, 2000, 5:19:20 PM12/8/00
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yeah Right on Ron!

fred

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Dec 8, 2000, 5:46:58 PM12/8/00
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i was....born in 1957, started listening due to an older bro in 1969.

saw frank live in 1972, 1976 and 1980.

interviewed him in 1987.

punctual, professional, AMAZING!!!!!!!!! NON-STOP MUSIC!!!!!!!!!!

fred

MASTERRINGO

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Dec 8, 2000, 8:03:55 PM12/8/00
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What was your interview fred?

Peter de B. Harrington

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Dec 8, 2000, 9:26:10 PM12/8/00
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"Ville Kinnunen" <ville.k...@pp1.inet.fish> wrote in message
news:IkcY5.11091$mq.2...@read2.inet.fi...

>
> MASTERRINGO kirjoitti viestissä
> <20001208094508...@ng-ck1.aol.com>...
> >Being only 24, I never got to ever see the man live.
> >Does anyone wanna tell what it was like to see the man in the flesh?
>
> Simple mathematics:
>
> 2000-24=1976
> 1993-1976=17
>
> You were seventeen when the guy died.
>
> Stand in front of a big mirror, point it with your index finger and say:
>
> "You should have gone to his concerts while he was still alive."
>

Yes, but as George W. would say you is doin Fuzzy Math.

Frank's last tour was in 1988 and it only covered the East coast and the
eastern part of the midwest. The tour disintegrated before heading to any
of the Western states.

Master Ringo would have only been 12, which is a bit young for a Zappa or
any other concert, and he had to be living in the East.

Now, here is a real bit of nostalgia. When I turned 10, my dad took me to
NYC for my birthday. We were looking through the New Yorker to see if
anything interesting was happening. My dad said, I don't suppose you want
to go see Frank Zappa and the Mothers at the Garrick theater. Of course, I
never heard of Frank or the Mothers at that time, so I opted for a James
Bond movie instead.

Pete


Biffy the Elephant Shrew

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Dec 9, 2000, 1:10:06 AM12/9/00
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First time: March 24, 1973; Saturday night at the San Diego Sports Arena.
The bill: Ruben & the Jets (for real), the Doobie Brothers, and the Mothers.
The lineup: FZ, Ruth Underwood, Ian Underwood (on clarinet & sax, no
keyboards), George Duke, Jean-Luc Ponty, Sal Marquez, Bruce Fowler, Tom
Fowler, Ralph Humphrey, and special guest Don Preston, who sat in for the
second half of the show only, sharing Duke's keyboard setup.

Frank began by welcoming us to "the Sports Aroma" and asking: "Are you
the kind of audience who wants *the show*, like we rehearsed it...or would
you rather hear SOMETHING WEIRD?" After a big cheer for the latter,
Frank replied, "Good! That's the kind of audience I like." The music began
with a medley of "Exercise Four," "Dog/Meat" and "50/50" (instrumental).
The remainder of the show consisted entirely of then-unreleased material,
primarily instrumental, heavy on improvisation. At one point FZ conducted
the audience. The sounds we were told to make included "your favorite
note in an Eric Clapton guitar solo--you know, the real high one that goes
WEEEE" and "a sound of great gastric relief...yes, this is a farting noise,
ladies and gentlemen!" At another point, Frank went off into an improvised
rap about the laboratories where they create "imaginary diseases." I also
remember Frank joining Ruth on percussion. The only actual songs that I
can remember were "Montana" and "Cosmik Debris." Unfortunately, there
is apparently no tape of this show, so you'll have to take my word for it
that it was the BEST ZAPPA SHOW EVER.

Second time: August 11, 1974, at the Golden Hall, which was not golden at
all, being a prefabricated concrete coal bunker in San Diego. Due to
equipment problems, the band was onstage, still soundchecking when the
audience entered the hall. (Nice of Frank not to make us wait outside until
he was finished, like most big rock stars would have done.) The Mothers
were down to a six-piece now: FZ, Duke, Ruthie, Napoleon Murphy Brock,
Tom Fowler and Chester Thompson. Since it was getting late, Zappa
decided to start the show while the techs were still working, and they
played "Uncle Meat," "Pygmy Twylyte," "Cosmik Debris" and "Help, I'm A
Rock" through the ailing sound system. Declaring "That seems to be as
good as it gets," Frank led the band off and Tom Waits came on to do the
"opening" set, performing solo at the electric piano. He was mercilessly
booed; some schmuck near me kept yelling "Somebody shoot that fucker!"
After a break, the Mothers returned and Frank brought back Tom Waits to
tell his "12-inch man" joke while the band played "Ol' 55" behind him. The
remainder of the Mothers' set was a mix of stuff from _Over-Nite
Sensation_ and _Apostrophe_ with as-yet unreleased material like "Inca
Roads," "T'Mershi Duween," and "Dupree's Paradise," and even a rather
reluctant version of "Mudshark," and an improvised blues closer in which FZ
lamented the poor sound we had been subjected to. I remember Tom
Fowler and Napoleon lying on the stage and kicking their legs in the air
during the final encore of "Apostrophe."

I didn't see FZ the next couple of times he came to town. I was not crazy
about the music of the Zoot-NY-Sheik period, my disappointment being
emphasized by the excellence of the older music that was coming out at
the same time on the unauthorized Warners albums. I made a half-hearted
last-minute attempt to catch an April 1980 show, but that didn't work out.
So...

Third time: 20 years ago today (well, tomorrow as I type this on the west
coast), the day after John Lennon was murdered. I didn't see how anyone
could play a rock concert that day and not acknowledge the horrible events
of the night before, especially someone who had once shared a stage with
the man. The least interesting of the Zappa shows I saw...lots of material
that would show up on _Tinsel Town Rebellion_ and YAWYI, plus all the
cheap-shock stuff like "Bobby Brown," "Enema Bandit," "Broken Hearts Are
For Assholes," "Honey Don't You..." and "Ms. Pinky." "Black Napkins" and
"Torture" were nice. This was one of the panty shows...strings of
undies all over the stage.

Fourth time around: one year and three days later, which would make it,
um, carry the 1, uhhh, December 12, 1981 at the Fox Theater in San
Diego. A much more musically interesting set, including such goodies as
"Envelopes," the "Baltimore/Moggio" medley, "Alien Orifice," "Drowning
Witch," and much more, including an electric-cooled pony harness--er, I
mean, lots of YAWYI songs again, and a couple of cool doo-wop medleys
("Man From Utopia/Mary Lou" and "The Closer You Are/Johnny Darling"), all
topped off with one of the few performances of "Frogs With Dirty Little
Lips." Frank spent a lot of time conducting the band while Steve Vai did
the stunt guitar parts.

Last call: a warm July evening in 1984, still in San Diego, but outdoors this
time. Napoleon was back! (Not for long, though.) Up there with Ike and
Ray, having entirely too much fun, occasionally flopping on their bellies
when FZ would invoke the night's secret word, "matches." (You need to
bring some if you want to use the toilet after Ray's been in there.) Frank
began by requesting that anyone within earshot who would be made to
vomit or to go to Hell by the use of bad words should leave, and to give
them time to do so, he would play an instrumental. And so, perched on a
stool as the sun faded, Zappa lit into a smoldering "Zoot Allures." The
show that followed had more buffoonery than the others I'd seen: abusing
a Raggedy Ann doll during "Honey Don't You Want A Man Like Me,"
brandishing an oversized glove for "Oh No" ("You think that you really know
the meaning of glove...You say glove is all you need..."). Napi did his
operatic "Evil Prince" aria. An uncharacteristically wistful Frank concluded
the show by noting "This is a nice place. I like playing here."

Sadly, he never came back.

Your pal,
Biffy the Elephant Shrew

http://www.mp3.com/michaelpdawson
http://members.aol.com/biffyshrew/biffy.html
It was great to know how to be a Christian! All you needed was an erection
and a bucket of cold water.

Charles Ulrich

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Dec 9, 2000, 3:09:28 AM12/9/00
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In article <3a3164f9....@news.intelenet.com>,
fhod...@hotmail.com (fred) wrote:

> i was....born in 1957, started listening due to an older bro in 1969.
>
> saw frank live in 1972, 1976 and 1980.

When and where in 1972? Inquiring wazooheads want to know.

Have anything to add to The Planet Of My Dreams
<http://www.members.home.net/fz-pomd/>?

--Charles

Charles Ulrich

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Dec 9, 2000, 3:02:57 AM12/9/00
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In article <20001209011006...@nso-ff.aol.com>,
biffy...@aol.commie.rats (Biffy the Elephant Shrew) wrote:

> First time: March 24, 1973; Saturday night at the San Diego Sports Arena.

> Unfortunately, there
> is apparently no tape of this show, so you'll have to take my word for it
> that it was the BEST ZAPPA SHOW EVER.
>
> Second time: August 11, 1974, at the Golden Hall, which was not golden at
> all, being a prefabricated concrete coal bunker in San Diego.

This one is in circulation.

> Tom Waits came on to do the
> "opening" set, performing solo at the electric piano. He was mercilessly
> booed; some schmuck near me kept yelling "Somebody shoot that fucker!"
> After a break, the Mothers returned and Frank brought back Tom Waits to
> tell his "12-inch man" joke while the band played "Ol' 55" behind him.

Among Waits' non-fans was the guy who taped the show, as evidenced by
the fact that he shut the tape off a few bars into "Ol' '55". This is a
pity since I really love the Mothers' version, which can be heard on the
tape of 11/9/74 (late) Boston. I wish there were a recording of them and
Waits actually performing the song, rather than just using it as a
background for the joke.

Sam and/or Karen, did you get Biffy's post? It belongs on your site.

--Charles

overcooked

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Dec 9, 2000, 7:58:22 AM12/9/00
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On Fri, 08 Dec 2000 21:24:56 GMT, "Ville Kinnunen"
<ville.k...@pp1.inet.fish> wrote:

>
>MASTERRINGO kirjoitti viestissä
><20001208094508...@ng-ck1.aol.com>...

>>Being only 24, I never got to ever see the man live.
>>Does anyone wanna tell what it was like to see the man in the flesh?
>

>Simple mathematics:
>
>2000-24=1976
>1993-1976=17
>
>You were seventeen when the guy died.
>
>Stand in front of a big mirror, point it with your index finger and say:
>
>"You should have gone to his concerts while he was still alive."

I first saw Zappa when I was 13.

overcooked

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Dec 9, 2000, 8:00:49 AM12/9/00
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On Fri, 8 Dec 2000 17:01:51 -0800, "Ron Spiegelhalter"
<r...@mk.bfd.rules> wrote:

I had to wait until I was 13

overcooked

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Dec 9, 2000, 8:02:32 AM12/9/00
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D'oh

Johan Lif

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Dec 9, 2000, 8:30:44 AM12/9/00
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Ron Spiegelhalter <r...@mk.bfd.rules> wrote:

> Bad math. He was only twelve when Frank toured last. How many of us were
> into Zappa (and able to go to his shows when we felt like it) when we were
> twelve?

I was, sort of. I was even a little bit into Zappa when I was 10 and
that was in 1988, but I didn't see him live that year -- I saw Paul
McCartney instead! Oh well.


Johan

fred hodshon

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Dec 9, 2000, 10:32:02 AM12/9/00
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in 1987 JAZZ FROM HELL was new, the PMRC stuff was fairly fresh.

my show was based around the idea of playing 1 song from every non-boot
Zappa lp chronologically.

The LA Times did an article on the show.

Frank read the article, I spoke with Gail to setup the time that Frank would
call in and he did!

We spoke mostly about political stuff, but ventured into rumorland and
historical corrections.

Loads of fun.

Tapes are in the garage.

fred


"MASTERRINGO" <maste...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20001208200355...@ng-bk1.aol.com...

Sam and/or Karen Rouse

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Dec 9, 2000, 1:34:47 PM12/9/00
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In article <culrich-1CA233...@news.sfu.ca>, Charles Ulrich
<cul...@istar.ca> wrote:

>
> Sam and/or Karen, did you get Biffy's post? It belongs on your site.

Yup; Patrick made sure I wouldn't miss it. Thanks, Pat!

I'll add it in my own idioprocrastinacious way.

Sam and/or Karen Rouse

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Dec 9, 2000, 2:35:34 PM12/9/00
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In article <rouse-09120...@i48-21-44.pdx.du.teleport.com>,

My idio overcame my procrastinacious, so I got this one up in record time:
http://www.teleport.com/~rouse/fz/tales/biffy_md.html

Biffy, let me know if you want anything changed.

-Sam

Biffy the Elephant Shrew

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Dec 9, 2000, 3:33:59 PM12/9/00
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In article <rouse-09120...@i48-21-44.pdx.du.teleport.com>,
ro...@teleport.com wrote:

>My idio overcame my procrastinacious, so I got this one up in record time:
>http://www.teleport.com/~rouse/fz/tales/biffy_md.html
>
>Biffy, let me know if you want anything changed.

I'll try to revise it and flesh it out a little and send you a better version
later. (I forgot to include the "Frank, show us your tits" story!)

Sam and/or Karen Rouse

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Dec 9, 2000, 4:32:23 PM12/9/00
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While I'm in my temporarily new responsive idiomatic non-procrastinacious
mode, I got another tale from the backlog added:
http://www.teleport.com/~rouse/fz/tales/bfu_95_10_17_ff.html

"Tommy Mars, Ike Willis, and Fast Frank's Lighter."
The Band From Utopia
Roseland Theater, Portland Oregon
17-October-1995

©2000 by Fast Frank :o{-

...okay people - I'm digging deeply within the dusty, musty, and
cobwebbie depths of my missoula oblongata to write this thing, paying
dearly for not having done it when my ears were still ringing from the
great music I heard on this particular night.

In April of '95, I had received a much needed injection of Zappacillin
thanks to Joel Thome's incredible tribute to the music of the hero of
my youth, an evening of unfettered and unabashed fondness I shared
with a concert hall full of howlingly appreciative fellow fans of
Frank. In early fall of '95, I opened the Willamette Week and was
greeted by the announcement that The Band From Utopia was coming to
town...oh, Nirvana!!

At seven o'clock p.m. on a warm and beautiful October 17, I was
hauling balls across the I-205 bridge towards Portland, "One Size Fits
All" blasting out of my tape player...I was pumped! I rode the MAX
light rail into downtown Portland and walked about two blocks to the
Roseland. I had never been there before, but beings that it was only
five minutes until the doors opened, I figured all I had to do was
watch for a line of equally pumped Frank aficionado's. Instead, I
nearly walked past the place, and I nearly missed the "line," which
consisted of a very stoned - and extremely comical - Rastafarian
fellow who grabbed me as I walked by and asked if I knew whether Ike
was playing that night. Luckily, I had decided to wear a tee shirt
with the famous "Yawn" picture from the cover of "Chunga's Revenge"
silk screened on the front.

The doors opened, and the Rastafarian fellow and I, along with a
handful of others who seemed to come out of the woodwork, walked into
the echoing eeriness of the funky old theater. While all the others
bee-lined it for the bar - this being a 21 and over show - I sauntered
up to the stage, which was only about waist-high. All the equipment
had been set up, and I leaned on the stage looking up at Tommy Mars'
collection of various keyboard contraptions. All the stuff had been
stencilled with "Banned From Utopia." Hmmm...

I look around and noticed that the place had suddenly filled up with
an incredibly diverse crowd, most of whom were stacked up at the bar.
When I looked back to the stage, I was awe-struck to see Mr. Mars
himself standing inches away from my elbow, twirling knobs and
fiddling with cables, cords, and other various assorted power
miscellanea. A sweet female voice came from behind me, "Hi Tommy!!"
Tommy's face lit up like a 100-watt light bulb, and he hopped down
from the stage and into a very nice friendly-type hug from a cute
young blond girl standing next to me..."Tommy Mars - Stud-About-Town!"

Being the quick and clever fellow that I am, I sort of blurted out,
"...gee, you know this guy?!?" Tommy, apparently thinking I was an
aquaintance of this lovely young lady (thanks, Tommy!), grabbed my
hand and shook it and said, "Hi! I'm Tommy Mars!" Naturally, I forgot
my name and what planet I was on - I mean, here was a guy whom I had
only seen in pictures, videos, or from a distance in other shows in
much bigger venues; a guy who had the talent and credentials that
earned him the rare honor of being a long-time keyboardist for Frank
Zappa, a guy whom I held in near-hero status, and whose musicianship
had always just blown me away - and here he was, shaking my hand and
introducing himself to me. My mind went back to a time 24 years
earlier, when I stood dumbstruck in the parking lot of the Memorial
Coliseum while his former boss, Mr. Zappa himself, pumped my hand up
and down and thanked me and my then-girlfriend for coming to the show.

I finally managed to croak out something about my name, along with
who-knows-what other tidbits of awestruck banality. Tommy seems like
an extemely nice guy, very humble for someone of such talent and who
had so often worked for a man who was arguably the most demanding
music conductor of the 20th century. I was surprized that, at a puny
five-foot-seven, I was at least an inch taller than Tommy, possibly
even more. He made up for it, however, with a handshake that told me
he would easily beat me at a game of "Cry Uncle."

Mr. Mars eventually hopped back on the stage and tweedled with some
more knobs. He was then joined by this skinny kid with long hair and
glasses, who settled behind an impressive drum kit and began his sound
check, whomping and thumping and tishing in that mysterious lingo
known only to drummers and sound board guys. Had I not seen Mr.
Wackerman the prvious spring, at the Joel Thome wing-ding, I would
never have recognized him. When I saw him play with FZ, he was this
skinny kid with short hair and no specs. The aging process does
strange things to a persons appearance, as I'm sure some of you may
have noticed. :o)

The house lights dimmed, and to a roar of applause, out onto the stage
strode the Fowler's Three; Tom, Walt, and Bruce, Kurt McGettrick, Mike
Miller, and last, but certainly not least, Mr. Ike Willis (wearing
cowboy boots, ferchrissakes!). Ike, with his Portland-adopted
"home-town boy" status, was the obvious fave of the now-packed
theater, and the man was an act unto himself. However, throughout the
show there were numerous howls to the others - Tommy Mars and Chad
Wackerman in particular.

The Band opened with a great rendition of "Andy," which a writer for
The Oregonian the following day had renamed "Is There Anything Good
Inside of You?" At the risk of pointing out the obvious, this is a
complex piece of music. But the Band did such an oustanding job on it
- especially for an opening piece - that it truly warrants mentioning
here. The Band From Utopia was off and running, and with the exception
of a brief intermission, they didn't slow down for the remainder of
the show. They played everything the most rabid Zappafanatic could
want to hear, including the theme from "Uncle Meat" and "Dog Breath -
In the Year of the Plague," replete with Ike doing the vast array of
vocal parts. In my mind, the ultimate test of anyone doing an FZ cover
tune would have to be "Inca Roads," and the Band, along with Ike doing
the vocal acrobatics, pulled it off...and the crowd went wild.

"Easy Meat," "Peaches En Regalia," "Echidna's Arf (Of You)," "Zomby
Woof." You name it - they played it. Mr. Wackerman did a percussion
piece of his own (which I'll be danged if I can recall the name of),
that simply awed the audience. Anyone who thinks that the drum solo
from "In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida" is some sort of display of percussive
ingenuity would most likely have suffered cardiac arrest at the sheer
coolness of the tune, and of the apparent ease with which Chad laid
the thing out and performed it. Simply amazing.

At one point during the show, a replica of the bust of FZ erected in
Vilnius, Lithuania, was unveiled in all it's splendiferous glory. Ike
said a few words about "...we all know why we're here tonight..." - it
was all quite touching.

Also at one point, while the instrumental faction of the group was
wailing out some bad-ass tunage, Ike looked down at me and noticed I
was puffing away on a particularly cheap brand of cigarette, and
proceeded to make the universal hand signals and facial expressions
for "I NEED A SMOKE!!" I tossed him a smoke. He then made the equally
universal hand signal for "I NEED A LIGHT!!," which consists basically
of holding your fist in front of your face and squiggling your thumb
up and down while making a sucking motion with your mouth...at least I
*hope* that's what he was doing! I then tossed him my prized $1.95
(plus tax) Djeep lighter - significant because they are made in
France, you know. Ike lit his smoke, and as is the habit of
lighter-borrowers everywhere, pocketed the damn thing.

I sort of got him back, though, during his introduction to "this next
song..." I yelled out "LOUIE LOUIE!" Mr. Willis chuckled. Then I
yelled out "...THEY LIKE IT *LOUD*, TOO, YOU KNOW!!"
Mr. Willis guffawed. Not quite satisfied, during a vocal part of some
tune I can't recall, as Ike was taking a deep breath to belt out the
next verse, I yelled "HIYO SLIVER, AWAAAYYY!!"
Ike cracked up, effectively forgetting the next line, and I was
semi-satisfied.

The final tune of the evening was "Outside Now." As this seemed to
soothe and quiet the crowd, I took the opportunity to look around at
the diverse collection of folks who had come to see this elite group
of musicians perform the music of this world-famous icon *and*
iconoclast. All were over 21, of course, although many couldn't have
been much over. There were yuppie-type couples with perfect hair and
wearing Dockers. There were a few older freak-types - myself included
- who no doubt were listening to the Mothers when the yuppie-types
were still pooping in their Pampers. My friend, the Rastafarian, was
holding up the other side of the stage, peering at Mike Miller and
playing an admirable air-guitar. In between, there were all variety of
ages, hair styles, and choice of attire ranging from the absurd to the
merely trendy.

And then I noticed something else...tears. This poignant song was
drawing tears from the crowd. Ike's sonorous baritone echoed through
the theater, over the hushed and attentive audience who were clearly
deeply affected by melody, memory, and maybe even by the impressive
amount of alcohol they had consumed. It choked me up, I'll tell ya.
The show was over....

The following week, I returned to Portland, to the Tower Records store
on NE 102nd, to pick up The Band From Utopia's new CD. As I was laying
out my hard-earn green to the dude behind the counter, we started
talking about FZ and it turned out that this guy knew Ike Willis
personally. I told him about the lighter thing, and jokingly said that
next time he saw Ike, tell him some guy wants his lighter back. He
studied me for a second, and replied, "..lighter, hell! That SOB still
owes me for a shit-load of tee shirts!"

Ike Willis...lovable scoundrel-at-large.

MASTERRINGO

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Dec 9, 2000, 7:50:12 PM12/9/00
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You should put this on the net!

Hanzo

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Dec 9, 2000, 8:00:26 PM12/9/00
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In article <20001208094508...@ng-ck1.aol.com>
maste...@aol.com (MASTERRINGO) writes:

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> From: maste...@aol.com (MASTERRINGO)
> Newsgroups: alt.fan.frank-zappa
> Date: 08 Dec 2000 14:45:08 GMT
> Organization: AOL, http://www.aol.co.uk
> Subject: Seeing Zappa live!
> Message-ID: <20001208094508...@ng-ck1.aol.com>
> Xref: news1.xs4all.nl alt.fan.frank-zappa:232640


>
> Being only 24, I never got to ever see the man live.
> Does anyone wanna tell what it was like to see the man in the flesh?

It would be cruel, it would make you so jealous. You just have just one
advantage. You don't know what you're missing.

Hanzo

Stephen Williams

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Dec 10, 2000, 10:31:20 AM12/10/00
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The first time I saw Frank I was 14 and was expecting Mudshark and Billy
the Mountain, but what I saw was The Grand Wazoo tour. Completely blew
me away, totaly unbelievable.
An other time I saw him a few years later, he came out and said he felt
like shit and didn't feel like singing, so he did a show that didn't
sound all that different than Guitar or Shut up.
Steve

Charles Ulrich

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Dec 10, 2000, 3:49:01 PM12/10/00
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In article <13283-3A...@storefull-118.iap.bryant.webtv.net>,
sw...@webtv.net (Stephen Williams) wrote:

> The first time I saw Frank I was 14 and was expecting Mudshark and Billy
> the Mountain, but what I saw was The Grand Wazoo tour. Completely blew
> me away, totaly unbelievable.

Well, if you saw the Grand Wazoo tour (as opposed to the Petit Wazoo
tour), you got Billy The Mountain, at least as a guest star in Greggery
Peccary.

Again, I'd like to know when and where in 1972, just in case you have
anything for me to add to The Planet Of My Dreams
<http://www.members.home.net/fz-pomd/>.

--Charles

myster...@my-deja.com

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Dec 10, 2000, 9:18:03 PM12/10/00
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tell ville to kiss your ass. you don't owe him any excuses. just be
happy you're here!


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

myster...@my-deja.com

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Dec 10, 2000, 9:36:25 PM12/10/00
to
the first time i saw frank was on may 10th, 1974 at the i.m.a.
auditorium in flint, mi.(which i'm convinced is the place that inspired
the song "this town is a sealed tuna sandwich"). this was 2 days before
the concert at notre dame which is preserved on "unmitigated audacity".
i don't remember too much about the show itself or the setlist or who
was in the band but i do remember the electricity in the air and the
feeling of anticipation for all the freeks in the area who only got a
chance to see a major touring act like this once in a blue moon. i'm
sure most of us were the kind of fan's who clapped for all the wrong
reasons, or whatever that quote was, but i think that we really did
appreciate that we were in the presence of greatness. for those of us
growing up in a small mid-western industrial town those chances were
few and far between.

Charles Ulrich

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Dec 10, 2000, 10:55:45 PM12/10/00
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In article <911ej9$bkn$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, myster...@my-deja.com
wrote:

> the first time i saw frank was on may 10th, 1974 at the i.m.a.
> auditorium in flint, mi.

A few follow-up questions for my Frank Zappa Gig List:

What does I. M. A. stand for?

Do you have a ticket stub or concert review confirming the date of the
show?

> (which i'm convinced is the place that inspired
> the song "this town is a sealed tuna sandwich").

Do you have evidence that the Mothers had played there before 1971? The
only Flint show in my database is 5/10/74.

Let me know your real name if you want to be credited by it in my
sources.

--Charles

myster...@my-deja.com

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Dec 11, 2000, 7:11:27 AM12/11/00
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> What does I. M. A. stand for?
> Industrial Mutual Association, some sort of quasi-
beneficialfoundation set up by General Motors to placate the factory
workers in Flint, home of the world's largest labor union, the U.A.W.

> Do you have a ticket stub or concert review confirming the date of
the
> show?
> Sadly, no.
> > ( > Do you have evidence that the Mothers had played there before

1971? The
> only Flint show in my database is 5/10/74.
> i believe that may 10th, 1974 and 5/10/74 are the same date.

> Let me know your real name if you want to be credited by it in my
> sources.
> what for?

> The Planet Of My Dreams
> http://www.members.home.net/fz-pomd/
>
> --Charles
>

Charles Ulrich

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Dec 11, 2000, 8:35:14 AM12/11/00
to
In article <912g9c$3bu$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, myster...@my-deja.com
wrote:

> > What does I. M. A. stand for?
> > Industrial Mutual Association

Thanks.

> > > ( > Do you have evidence that the Mothers had played there before
> 1971? The
> > only Flint show in my database is 5/10/74.
> > i believe that may 10th, 1974 and 5/10/74 are the same date.

Correct. But you stated that you believed that Flint was the inspiration
for "This Town Is A Sealed Tuna Sandwich". If you meant this literally,
it would suggest that the Mothers had performed there before 1971, when
that song was recorded. (If you didn't mean it literally, fine, but I
had to ask.)

> > Let me know your real name if you want to be credited by it in my
> > sources.
> > what for?

For explaining I. M. A. if nothing else. Check out the credits at
<http://www.members.home.net/fz-pomd/giglist/sources.html>. I'll add you
as mysteryroach if you don't want your real name to appear.

--Charles

John Henley

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Dec 11, 2000, 3:20:32 PM12/11/00
to
In article <20001208094508...@ng-ck1.aol.com>,
maste...@aol.com (MASTERRINGO) wrote:

> Being only 24, I never got to ever see the man live.
> Does anyone wanna tell what it was like to see the man in the flesh?

A little different every time, just like
the albums.

But never less than a professional rock
performance by a crackerjack band.

And those guitar solos could really transfix
you, if you liked guitar solos.

Frank was always cool to watch, too. He had
a way of smoking a cigarette with style that was
without equal since the days of Bogart and other
Hollywood stars.

And when he liked what was going on, he'd smile...
and few smiles were as dazzling as FZ's. (Maybe
that was because his smile was so contrary to
his reputation.)

John Henley
Austin TX

myster...@my-deja.com

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Dec 11, 2000, 10:29:16 PM12/11/00
to
>
> But you stated that you believed that Flint was the inspiration
> for "This Town Is A Sealed Tuna Sandwich". If you meant this
literally,
> it would suggest that the Mothers had performed there before 1971,
when
> that song was recorded. (If you didn't mean it literally, fine, but I
> had to ask.)
>
> > i didn't mean it literally. sorry. but the place is such a
shithole that it lends itself to that interpretation. also, as in-
hey,hey hey all you girls in those industrial towns...my real name is
jay ziel, for what it's worth. put me on your list. to paraphrase navin
johnson, "that is the kind of spontaneous publicity that makes things
happen!"

Rolf Maurer

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Jan 5, 2001, 1:38:07 AM1/5/01
to
On 09 Dec 2000 06:10:06 GMT, biffy...@aol.commie.rats (Biffy the
Elephant Shrew) wrote:


>Last call: a warm July evening in 1984, still in San Diego, but outdoors this

>time. [snip] The

>show that followed had more buffoonery than the others I'd seen: abusing
>a Raggedy Ann doll during "Honey Don't You Want A Man Like Me,"
>brandishing an oversized glove for "Oh No" ("You think that you really know
>the meaning of glove...You say glove is all you need...").

Do you suppose this gag has anything to do with the TOU back cover
photo?

(Yes, I've been away from the ng and I'm currently reading my way
back to the future -- currently I'm only 3,076 posts behind. It's
great to have me back.)

Rolf

Peter de B. Harrington

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Jan 8, 2001, 11:26:37 PM1/8/01
to

"Rolf Maurer" <rma...@NewStarBooks.com> wrote in message
news:3a7d7061.3052940135@172.16.1.1...

> On 09 Dec 2000 06:10:06 GMT, biffy...@aol.commie.rats (Biffy the
> Elephant Shrew) wrote:
>
>
> >Last call: a warm July evening in 1984, still in San Diego, but outdoors
this
> >time. [snip] The
> >show that followed had more buffoonery than the others I'd seen: abusing
> >a Raggedy Ann doll during "Honey Don't You Want A Man Like Me,"
> >brandishing an oversized glove for "Oh No" ("You think that you really
know
> >the meaning of glove...You say glove is all you need...").
>
> Do you suppose this gag has anything to do with the TOU back cover
> photo?
>
>
> Rolf

On the back of ToU, Frank is wearing an oven mitt. I think, it has more to
do with freshly baked muffins than the "glove is all you need."

Pete


Denis Griffin

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Jan 9, 2001, 12:10:55 AM1/9/01
to

Michael Jackson use to wear only one glove. I think it might have
something to do with that.

Scott

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Jan 10, 2001, 3:47:21 PM1/10/01
to

Denis Griffin wrote:

now. he just wears a mask to cover what's left of his freakishly mutilated face

Denis Griffin

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Jan 10, 2001, 5:55:24 PM1/10/01
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But they did find Michael Jackson's other glove. It was stuck in Boy
Georges underwear.

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