Hewwo! This place seems nice

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Xela Phaucks

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Nov 16, 2020, 3:22:25 AM11/16/20
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I found this place after looking through furry newsgroups, and this seems quite active in comparison. I'm guessing this is mostly dragonkin from the few posts I've read? Anyway, I'm a furry who really loves dragons, so I think I'll stay here. :3
I was looking into Usenet recently since I'm interested in internet history and distributed systems like this, so I'm trying it out through Google Groups for now. And I need more ways to talk to people during this quarantine.. >~<
I saw some posts about a dragoncode, so I made one (I hope I did it right):
DC2.De Gm Sku Ceb|au+^ A- Fr--- Nu M1 R Ac+++ J+ S+ I- Tc+++ E++ Df+

Sfner

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Nov 18, 2020, 2:45:16 AM11/18/20
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I think you're right about here being a "mostly dragonkin" space (or, at
least, in the recent years), but know that liking dragons can be just
the first step towards seeing parts of yourself as "dragon-ish" and,
after some time, reaching a conclusion that you're a dragon from inside.

Usenet (or Google Groups) nowadays is a lot slower and old-fashioned
when compared to other "modern" communication platforms like Discord,
Telegram, Mastodon or Twitter. More than that, they have more people
available at pretty much any time in a way it's easier for you to talk
to people during this quarantine. If there wasn't any special interest
towards this group, I guess you'd have gone the mass social media and
furry convention telegram chats path. For history purposes, the easiest
path are checking Wikis. For understanding distributed systems, the
easiest path is studying the RFCs (or open standards) that describe the
protocols of the technology in question and some source codes. What did
you see here that seemed special that you couldn't find anywhere else?
Are you considering the possibility that you are a dragonkin?

Sorry if my questions sounded a bit harsh and intrusive, but I had the
feeling that you were asking yourself if "*being* a furry" overlapped
with other stuff and if you were "more than just a furry" in some way.

--
DC2.Dw Gn L W T+ Phvfwlt Sku Cgr,egr,vta,wye,bye B- A+ Nm F+ R++ Ac~ J+
S+ U--- I+ Q--- Tc+++ E++ Df+

Xela Phaucks

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Nov 19, 2020, 4:09:59 AM11/19/20
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On Tuesday, November 17, 2020 at 11:45:16 PM UTC-8, Sfner wrote:
> On 16/11/2020 05:22, Xela Phaucks wrote:
> > I found this place after looking through furry newsgroups, and this seems quite active in comparison. I'm guessing this is mostly dragonkin from the few posts I've read? Anyway, I'm a furry who really loves dragons, so I think I'll stay here. :3
> > I was looking into Usenet recently since I'm interested in internet history and distributed systems like this, so I'm trying it out through Google Groups for now. And I need more ways to talk to people during this quarantine.. >~<
> > I saw some posts about a dragoncode, so I made one (I hope I did it right):
> > DC2.De Gm Sku Ceb|au+^ A- Fr--- Nu M1 R Ac+++ J+ S+ I- Tc+++ E++ Df+
> I think you're right about here being a "mostly dragonkin" space (or, at
> least, in the recent years), but know that liking dragons can be just
> the first step towards seeing parts of yourself as "dragon-ish" and,
> after some time, reaching a conclusion that you're a dragon from inside.
>
> Usenet (or Google Groups) nowadays is a lot slower and old-fashioned
> when compared to other "modern" communication platforms like Discord,
> Telegram, Mastodon or Twitter. More than that, they have more people
> available at pretty much any time in a way it's easier for you to talk
> to people during this quarantine. If there wasn't any special interest
> towards this group, I guess you'd have gone the mass social media and
> furry convention telegram chats path. For history purposes, the easiest
> path are checking Wikis. For understanding distributed systems, the
> easiest path is studying the RFCs (or open standards) that describe the
> protocols of the technology in question and some source codes. What did
> you see here that seemed special that you couldn't find anywhere else?

Oh yes, I do use a lot of those other platforms... and been down many wikiholes. I'm just also looking here out of curiosity; it's different. It feels like sending emails, but anyone can read and reply. I kinda like it.
Also I don't see people using dragon code anywhere else. ;3

> Are you considering the possibility that you are a dragonkin?

I don't think I'd consider myself a spiritual person, but I do identify as a dragon online at least, and I would want to be one physically; I'm not sure. What'd you consider dragonkin?

tom

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Nov 21, 2020, 3:58:25 PM11/21/20
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Discord is spyware because it collects all information that passes through its communication platform. As Discord is a centralized communication platform, all communications have to go through Discord's official servers, where all of that information can potentially be recorded. The vast majority of said information has been confirmed to be recorded, such as all communications between users. Discord has also been confirmed to use other spyware features such as various forms of telemetry. Discord's main source of income is from investment, from which it has received over $279.3 million dollars[4]. Discord cannot be built from source and the source code for Discord is unavailable.

Discord does not make its source code available

It is impossible to download and examine Discord's source code, which means that it is impossible to prove that Discord is not spyware. Any program which does not make its source code available is potential spyware.

Discord confirms that it collects large amounts of sensitive user data

Discord explicitly confirms in its privacy policy[1] that it collects the following information:

• IP Address
• Device UUID
• User's e-mail address
• All text messages
• All images
• All VOIP data (voice chat)
• Open rates for e-mail sent by Discord

Discord does not explicitly confirm that it collects this information, but still collects it by default:

• Logs of all of the other programs that are open on your computer

The implications of this information can be broken down like this: By recording your IP address, Discord can track your general location (about as precise as which county you are in). Discord can also tell which devices you use, as it uniquely identifies each device, and how much you use those devices, as it can record your device usage habits (since Discord is usually open in the background so that it can receive messages). Discord also records every single interaction you have with other users through its service. This means that Discord is confirmed to log every conversation that you have through Discord, and record everything that you say on Discord, and view all images that you send through Discord. Therefore, none of your interactions on Discord are private. Discord's privacy policy also contains several occurrences of phrases such as "including but not limited to," which is an explicit confirmation that Discord contains more spyware features that are not disclosed to the user.

Discord contains features which allow integration with other spyware platforms

Discord contains the opt-in spyware feature known as "social media integration." This allows you to sync your persistent user identity on Discord with your persistent user identity on other spyware platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter. In its privacy policy[1], Discord has confirmed that if you opt in to this spyware feature, Discord will obtain an undisclosed amount of access to information obtained about you by the spyware platforms that you choose to sync with.

Discord contains a process logger

Discord has been confirmed to monitor the open processes on your operating system. This is a spyware feature known as a "process logger" that is generally used to record your program usage habits. This was confirmed by the CTO of Discord in a Reddit thread.[2] In the same thread, the CTO also elaborates that this spyware feature (the monitoring of processes) is mandatory for several features of the platform. The CTO and a Discord engineer go on to claim that Discord does not use the process logger to send records of the open processes on the user's computer.

The test to prove that Discord logs processes was done again by the writer with procmon on 4/11/2019 with the features: "Use data to customize my Discord Experience" and "Display currently running game as a status message" turned off. Discord did NOT log all of the processes open this way. However, when setting the "Display currently running game as a status message" turned on, the behavior described in[2] was replicated. You can see that behavior here: Discord process logging as described in [2] confirmed with procmon

It turns out that this feature can be disabled through the UI. Because of the nature of closed-source software it isn't possible for either this article or the Discord developers to prove how much information is being sent to Discord's servers when the process logger is turned on. But it's at least possible to turn it off.

Discord uses its process logging for advertising

Discord shows this in its privacy option here: Discord process logging usefulness

That the process logging features of Discord are now being recorded on Discord's servers as a form of telemetry (spyware), and removes speculation about why this feature exists. It is clarified by Discord that this spyware feature is used for advertising to its users.[8] This means that Discord is recording the programs you have open to build a statistical model of what programs you might buy/license in the future.

Discord tries to force some users to give their Telephone numbers

Discord will lock users out of its service and will not allow them to continue using it without giving their phone number or contacting Discord support. This kind of feature is designed to extract very personal information out of its users (phone numbers). The criteria for locking out users isn't known. discord phone verification

Discord receives government requests for your information

Discord has confirmed in an email correspondence[6] that it does receive government requests for information. So, we know that the government potentially has access to all of the information that Discord collects about you. You can read a copy of the email image posted in the source here in case the link there dies.

Speculation on Discord's future

It's unknown whether Discord currently is or isn't selling user information. Currently, Discord has been able to consistently raise new investment capital, which is at a level where it could reasonably be covering all of its operating costs. However, Discord, like any other company, is not going to exist in a constant state of investment. Discord is going to have to transition away from an investment-financed business model to a revenue model that exclusively relies on generating revenue from the users of the platform.

Discord has several ways of making money. It can license emoji's and other features of the program with Discord Nitro[5], or it can make money licensing video games through its new online store, as a competitor to Steam. However, both of these revenue sources may not be enough. Discord has raised $279.3 million dollars[4] and it has to return on this investment. (which is more than 279.3 million dollars that has to be paid back)

If Discord is not able to satisfy its obligation to its investors, it has a third option- selling user information to advertisers. Discord is already datamining its users to produce its recommendation system,[8] which means that it is already turning its userbase into extremely valuable, sellable, advertising data. Discord has 130 million users[7], and it can produce a statistical model of what games each user (who does not opt-out of advertising) owns, plays, and wants to buy. This is incredibly valuable information that Discord can sell if it cannot reach its profit obligations with its current revenue model. If Discord was a successful games store, then it would not need to do this. But if Discord gets in financial trouble, it probably will be forced to liquidate this asset.

Further Reading:

Friends Don't Let Friends Use Discord [archive.is]
Help Me, Tom's Guide: Is Discord Tracking Me? [archive.is]
Why Discord is Trash
Why You Shouldn't Use Discord
THE DISCORD SITUATION [web.archive.org]

Sources:

1. Discord Privacy Policy [web.archive.org] [archive.is]
2. Why is Discord recording our open programs and uploading them? [web.archive.org] [archive.is]
3. Discord [wayback.archive-it.org] [archive.is]
4. Crunchbase [web.archive.org] [archive.is]
5. Discord Nitro [archive.is]
6. Discord receives government requests. No plans on adding E2E Encryption any time soon. [archive.is] [web.archive.org]
7. Number of registered Discord users [web.archive.org]
8. Data Privacy Controls [web.archive.org]

This article was created on 11/23/17
This article was last edited on 4/11/2019

Sfner

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Nov 27, 2020, 3:14:01 AM11/27/20
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Firstly, sorry for the delay in the reply.

> I don't think I'd consider myself a spiritual person
Me neither, but they're not rare occasions where you can remap
"spirituality"-related vocabulary into something you consider more
tangible using tools like a philosophical interpretation of those terms.

> What'd you consider dragonkin?
Anyone who identifies themselves, at least partially, as a dragon. The
key to the full comprehension is on understanding "to identify as". It's
you defining yourself for yourself in terms of a being, thing or idea
that isn't human.

You could explain for yourself that you're human and nothing else and
that's fine: non-otherkin are presumed to think this way. You can
consider some spiritual aspect of yours makes you a dragon. You could
also think that you've always been acting your way, but your way isn't
human as with "everyone else", but you're more towards being a dragon
for some reason.

As you mentioned being a furry, you may know that fursonas can be
created to be just a made-up character, an avatar, or to represent the
person whose fursona is visible. If you already saw yourself as being at
least partially dragon in some non-physical sense, I guess you didn't
really get the choice of being another thing in the fandom. "Kinsonas"
(otherkin + fursonas) fulfill the role of being one's kintype visible
for the fandom. When someone suggests a change to an avatar fursona,
it's usually perceived as a change to the result of creative work; when
someone suggests a change to a personal fursona, it's usually perceived
as a change to the way that person presents themselves to the world;
when someone suggests a change to a kinsona, it's perceived as a request
to change who one fundamentally is.

As definitions are more likely a starting point for discussions than an
end on itself, and with a wide range of disagreeing opinions, I invite
the other dragons of this newsgroup to point out where I made some mistakes.

Xela Phaucks

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Nov 27, 2020, 5:38:44 AM11/27/20
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I've been talking about gender identity just recently and this seems kind of similar with the way you said it. I think I understand what it means to identify. If I ask myself "what am I?" just as it feels wrong to say "I am a male/female," it does feel right to say "I am a dragon". Not that dragon is my gender identity, but it can be part of my self-concept in the same way gender isn't. As for being a furry, I didn't have an idea of what my fursona was for a while because I just liked the furry aesthetic and community. I did think about it later, and it's been my social identity interacting with the furry community. It is a part of personal identity now as being a furry is.
I guess what really matters is that I like saying I'm a dragon 🐉
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