Foo (Fighters)

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Peter Boulding

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Sep 5, 2018, 7:00:41 AM9/5/18
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What I learned on the internet today:

The metasyntactic variable "foo" (or "fu", as in fubar) is older than I
expected, going back to the 1930s. Which sort of makes sense of the slang
term used in WW2 for the UFOs that were frequently--if briefly--sighted by
pilots: "foo fighters".

... Which could explain the band name. But wait: what's this?


"... either Jell-O and Foo (a non-dairy whipped topping that we made from a
powder) or ton cake (it's bigger than a pound cake), which was nothing more
than a sheet cake with some baker's sugar sprinkled on it...

"About ten minutes later, the calls for dessert started, and I had the
waiters send out the trays of plates with cake on them. As I knew would
happen, there were immediate cries for 'Foo! Foo'", done in a high falsetto
voice. I also knew that Arnie would clamp down on it. He jumped up and
yelled back, "No, you don't get Foo, not after last week! No more Foo until
you learn to behave yourselves!" Last Sunday the dessert was Jell-O and Foo,
and had resulted in a Foo Fight at the end. In fact, it was about even odds
that when Foo was served, a Foo Fight would ensue."


The above excerpts from a frat house episode, set in the 1970s, come from a
lengthy and well-written self-published do-over tale titled "A Fresh Start".
I love the idea that the band name refers to this kind of foo fight, but
can't find any other references to "a non-dairy whipped topping which we
made from a powder" called, or known as, "Foo" -- not even in Wikipedia's
chunky "Foo" disambiguation page -- and am therefore wondering if the author
is pulling my leg.

Anyone remember such a confection or, rather, the name "Foo" being applied
to Instant Whip, Miracle Whip, Angel Delight, or similar ersatz foods?


--
Regards, Peter Boulding
pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal Music: http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=794240&content=music

Les Albert

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Sep 5, 2018, 1:07:28 PM9/5/18
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On Wed, 05 Sep 2018 12:00:08 +0100, Peter Boulding
<pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk> wrote:

>What I learned on the internet today:
>
>The metasyntactic variable "foo" (or "fu", as in fubar) is older than I
>expected, going back to the 1930s. Which sort of makes sense of the slang
>term used in WW2 for the UFOs that were frequently--if briefly--sighted by
>pilots: "foo fighters".
>
>... Which could explain the band name. But wait: what's this?
>"... either Jell-O and Foo (a non-dairy whipped topping that we made from a
>powder) or ton cake (it's bigger than a pound cake), which was nothing more
>than a sheet cake with some baker's sugar sprinkled on it...
> ... can't find any other references to "a non-dairy whipped topping which we
>made from a powder" called, or known as, "Foo" -- not even in Wikipedia's
>chunky "Foo" disambiguation page -- and am therefore wondering if the author
>is pulling my leg.
>Anyone remember such a confection or, rather, the name "Foo" being applied
>to Instant Whip, Miracle Whip, Angel Delight, or similar ersatz foods?



Here is how to make a whipped topping from powdered ingredients:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESOejai5O5I
and here is a packaged powder product to make a whipped topping:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sy66CZZRFrU

I have never had a whipped topping made from a powder but it looks
somewhat foo-foo (not to be confused with the Foo-Foo Festival
https://www.foofoofest.com/ ).

Les

Les Albert

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Sep 5, 2018, 1:42:33 PM9/5/18
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On Wed, 05 Sep 2018 12:00:08 +0100, Peter Boulding
<pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk> wrote:

>What I learned on the internet today:
>The metasyntactic variable "foo" (or "fu", as in fubar) is older than I
>expected, going back to the 1930s. Which sort of makes sense of the slang
>term used in WW2 for the UFOs that were frequently--if briefly--sighted by
>pilots: "foo fighters". ...


I wonder if you came across Smokey Stover in your foo research. It's
a comic strip that was popular during the war years; I used to read it
in the NY Daily News at that time. Foo appeared in the Bill Holman
comic strip; Smokey and the fire chief drove to fires in a two wheeled
fire truck known as the Foo Mobile. It's where the WW2 pilots got
their foo from. What’s Foo? Holman said, "My uncle found this word
engraved on the bottom of a jade statue in San Francisco’s China town.
The word Foo means Good-Luck."

Here's the Smokey Stover web site, and you can see what the foo mobile
looked like: http://www.smokey-stover.com/

Les

Beaver Fever

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Sep 5, 2018, 4:09:01 PM9/5/18
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what a terrible band

Lesmond

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Sep 7, 2018, 2:49:47 PM9/7/18
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On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 13:08:59 -0700 (PDT), Beaver Fever wrote:

>
>what a terrible band

I wouldn't call them terrible, just really boring.

--
If there's a nuclear winter, at least it'll snow.



Howard

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Sep 8, 2018, 11:43:03 AM9/8/18
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Peter Boulding <pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk> wrote

> ... Which could explain the band name. But wait: what's this?

There seem to be a number of hardcore Foo Fighter fans still out there,
based on all of the angry emails:

https://deadspin.com/1828886968

(Scroll down about 1/3 of the way through the angry emails)

Beaver Fever

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Mar 29, 2022, 8:29:58 PMMar 29
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I hope no one finds this comment

Been keeping my head down the past few days



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