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Volcanic ash shock horror death inconvenience

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John Dean

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Apr 15, 2010, 7:21:31 AM4/15/10
to
So, those people in Iceland are getting their own back for us trying to make
them pay back the money their banks stole from our citizens. They've
triggered the doomsday volcano scenario:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8621407.stm

All flights into and out of the country are stopped.
People in the north of the country are reporting a smell of sulphur (but we
think that may just be a lifestyle thing and unconnected to the DEATH FLOW
SUFFOCATING ASH INCONVENIENT volcanic eruption.)

Down here we're just hunkered down waiting for the pyroclastic flow. I've
borrowed a couple of cats, stunned them with a rubber mallet and arranged
them in artistic poses so our house will be Most Visited at the "Oxford went
the same way as Pompeii" exhibition in a couple of years time.
--
John Dean
Oxford


Peter Boulding

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Apr 15, 2010, 8:54:34 AM4/15/10
to
On Thu, 15 Apr 2010 12:21:31 +0100, "John Dean" <john...@fraglineone.net>
wrote in <82ob75...@mid.individual.net>:

Good thing I downloaded latest messages; I was just about to post
"Eyjafjallajokull trumps 9/11". [1][2]

Airports are fast closing all over Europe; Brussels now closed, the BBC is
currently rabbiting about Spain... (where's Jim Beaver now?)

See flash graphic at
<http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/interactive/2010/apr/15/volcano-airport-disruption-iceland>.

[1] After 9/11 flights were severely restricted here but didn't stop
altogether.
[2] A month's free snootiness points to anyone who claims to be able to
pronounce "Eyjafjallajokull".

--
Regards, Peter Boulding
pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal Music and Images: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/ and
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=794240&content=music

Mikko Peltoniemi

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Apr 15, 2010, 9:44:53 AM4/15/10
to
Peter Boulding wrote:

> Airports are fast closing all over Europe; Brussels now closed, the BBC is
> currently rabbiting about Spain... (where's Jim Beaver now?)

I've got tickets for July. Let's hope it'll clear out by then...

--
My Flickr Page
http://www.flickr.com/photos/25892068@N07/

John Hatpin

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Apr 15, 2010, 10:13:39 AM4/15/10
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John Dean wrote:

> People in the north of the country are reporting a smell of sulphur (but we
> think that may just be a lifestyle thing and unconnected to the DEATH FLOW
> SUFFOCATING ASH INCONVENIENT volcanic eruption.)

I noticed a distinct smell shortly after waking up this morning, but I
wouldn't describe it as "sulphur".

More like a cross between coffee and bacon, if you ask me.
--
John Hatpin

Ask no questions, hear no answers.

John Hatpin

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Apr 15, 2010, 10:22:37 AM4/15/10
to
Mikko Peltoniemi wrote:

> Peter Boulding wrote:
>
> > Airports are fast closing all over Europe; Brussels now closed, the BBC is
> > currently rabbiting about Spain... (where's Jim Beaver now?)
>
> I've got tickets for July. Let's hope it'll clear out by then...

Last time it went off, it lasted over a year, from December 1821 to
January 1823:

<http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/7593716/Volcano-ash-chaos-previous-eruption-lasted-more-than-a-year.html>
or: http://tinyurl.com/y3kta3d

plausible prose man

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Apr 15, 2010, 10:36:58 AM4/15/10
to
On Apr 15, 7:21 am, "John Dean" <john-d...@fraglineone.net> wrote:

> Down here we're just hunkered down waiting for the pyroclastic flow. I've
> borrowed a couple of cats, stunned them with a rubber mallet and arranged
> them in artistic poses so our house will be Most Visited at the "Oxford went
> the same way as Pompeii" exhibition in a couple of years time.


I did that too, but just because I hate cats.

Esra Sdrawkcab

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Apr 15, 2010, 9:37:48 AM4/15/10
to
On Thu, 15 Apr 2010 14:54:34 +0200, Peter Boulding
<pjbn...@unspampboulding.co.uk> wrote:


> [2] A month's free snootiness points to anyone who claims to be able to
> pronounce "Eyjafjallajokull".
>

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Eyjafjallajökull.ogg

HTH


--
Nuns! Nuns! Reverse

huey.c...@gmail.com

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Apr 15, 2010, 10:39:55 AM4/15/10
to
Peter Boulding <pjbn...@unspampboulding.co.uk> wrote:
> A month's free snootiness points to anyone who claims to be able to
> pronounce "Eyjafjallajokull".

It's pronounced 'throat-wobbler mangrove'.

--
Huey

Peter Boulding

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Apr 15, 2010, 10:52:56 AM4/15/10
to
On Thu, 15 Apr 2010 15:37:48 +0200, "Esra Sdrawkcab" <ad...@127.0.0.1> wrote
in <op.va7j9azshswpfo@dell3100>:

>> [2] A month's free snootiness points to anyone who claims to be able to
>> pronounce "Eyjafjallajokull".
>>
>

>http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Eyjafjallaj�kull.ogg
>
>HTH

It doesn't.

Nick Spalding

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Apr 15, 2010, 11:09:14 AM4/15/10
to
John Dean wrote, in <82ob75...@mid.individual.net>
on Thu, 15 Apr 2010 12:21:31 +0100:

> So, those people in Iceland are getting their own back for us trying to make
> them pay back the money their banks stole from our citizens. They've
> triggered the doomsday volcano scenario:
>
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8621407.stm
>
> All flights into and out of the country are stopped.
> People in the north of the country are reporting a smell of sulphur (but we
> think that may just be a lifestyle thing and unconnected to the DEATH FLOW
> SUFFOCATING ASH INCONVENIENT volcanic eruption.)

I just heard that the mother of one of my Latvian friends has died and
she can't get home to Riga and is even more upset than she would anyway
be.
--
Nick Spalding

John Hatpin

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Apr 15, 2010, 12:07:35 PM4/15/10
to
Esra Sdrawkcab wrote:

He should get a job as a station announcer on the railways here.

Snidely

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Apr 15, 2010, 1:13:41 PM4/15/10
to
On Apr 15, 7:13 am, John Hatpin

<RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:
> John Dean wrote:
> > People in the north of the country are reporting a smell of sulphur (but we
> > think that may just be a lifestyle thing and unconnected to the DEATH FLOW
> > SUFFOCATING ASH INCONVENIENT volcanic eruption.)
>
> I noticed a distinct smell shortly after waking up this morning, but I
> wouldn't describe it as "sulphur".
>
> More like a cross between coffee and bacon, if you ask me.

As long as it isn't the product described here:
<http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-morford/the-kfc-double-down-one-
s_b_531749.html>

(I get the impression the reviewer doesn't approve of the item
reviewed)

/dps

bill van

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Apr 15, 2010, 1:26:17 PM4/15/10
to
In article <178es5l0a3ho3cnlv...@4ax.com>,
John Hatpin <RemoveThi...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:

> Mikko Peltoniemi wrote:
>
> > Peter Boulding wrote:
> >
> > > Airports are fast closing all over Europe; Brussels now closed, the BBC
> > > is
> > > currently rabbiting about Spain... (where's Jim Beaver now?)
> >
> > I've got tickets for July. Let's hope it'll clear out by then...
>
> Last time it went off, it lasted over a year, from December 1821 to
> January 1823:
>

How long were flights grounded that time?

David Friedman

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Apr 15, 2010, 1:54:25 PM4/15/10
to
In article <billvan-3CB87E...@news.shawcable.net>,
bill van <bil...@separatethis.shaw.ca> wrote:

About eighty years. Unless you count lighter than air craft.

--
http://www.daviddfriedman.com/ http://daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
Author of
_Future Imperfect: Technology and Freedom in an Uncertain World_,
Cambridge University Press.

QueBarbara

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Apr 15, 2010, 3:00:06 PM4/15/10
to
On Thu, 15 Apr 2010 12:21:31 +0100, "John Dean"
<john...@fraglineone.net> wrote:

>Down here we're just hunkered down waiting for the pyroclastic flow. I've
>borrowed a couple of cats, stunned them with a rubber mallet and arranged
>them in artistic poses so our house will be Most Visited at the "Oxford went
>the same way as Pompeii" exhibition in a couple of years time.

::splort::

--
QueBarbara

Mark Brader

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Apr 15, 2010, 3:08:13 PM4/15/10
to
Peter Boulding:

> [2] A month's free snootiness points to anyone who claims to be able to
> pronounce "Eyjafjallajokull".

Am I the only who whose impression on seeing that word was that someone
had made it up by typing random letters? 12 out of 17 are on the home row!
--
Mark Brader, Toronto, m...@vex.net
non-resident pedant

John Hatpin

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Apr 15, 2010, 3:14:56 PM4/15/10
to
bill van wrote:

Things were different then. Not a single flight was cancelled, or even
delayed.

Cheetah99218

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Apr 15, 2010, 3:35:15 PM4/15/10
to

"Peter Boulding" <pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk> wrote in message
news:mi2es55gc1vr32ghe...@4ax.com...

Stupid me: I tried to Rot-13 that word.

Mark Brader

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Apr 15, 2010, 3:57:53 PM4/15/10
to
Peter Boulding:

>> [2] A month's free snootiness points to anyone who claims to be able
>> to pronounce "Eyjafjallajokull".

"Cheetah99218":


> Stupid me: I tried to Rot-13 that word.

My friend Michael Wares suggests that it's really in Welsh in rot13.
--
Mark Brader | "...there are lots of things that I don't remember,
Toronto | but if you ask for an example, I can't remember any."
m...@vex.net | --Michael Wares

Mark Steese

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Apr 15, 2010, 4:03:26 PM4/15/10
to
"Esra Sdrawkcab" <ad...@127.0.0.1> wrote in
news:op.va7j9azshswpfo@dell3100:

> On Thu, 15 Apr 2010 14:54:34 +0200, Peter Boulding
> <pjbn...@unspampboulding.co.uk> wrote:
>
>
>> [2] A month's free snootiness points to anyone who claims to be able to
>> pronounce "Eyjafjallajokull".
>>
>

> http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Eyjafjallaj�kull.ogg
>
> HTH

The main article on Eyjafjallaj�kull has a notice that "It has been
suggested that portions of this article be moved into Fimmv�r�uh�ls,"
followed by the injunction "(Discuss)." Someone at Wiki appears to have a
rather dry sense of humor.
--
The boughs rustled, and the air was stirred by the muffled beat of their
wings: I could see them, like unearthly, boding shapes, as they swooped
between me and the stars. -Bayard Taylor

Mark Steese

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Apr 15, 2010, 4:12:09 PM4/15/10
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Snidely <snide...@gmail.com> wrote in
news:6b607b27-c691-439c...@w42g2000yqm.googlegroups.com:

Really? He seemed a bit wishy-washy to me.
--
The "Kinkade Glow" could be seen as derived in spirit from the
"lustrous, pearly mist" that Mark Twain had deried in the Bierstadt
paintings, and, the level of execution to one side, there are certain
unsettling similarities between the two painters.
-Joan Didion

Opus the Penguin

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Apr 15, 2010, 4:40:44 PM4/15/10
to
Esra Sdrawkcab (ad...@127.0.0.1) wrote:

> On Thu, 15 Apr 2010 14:54:34 +0200, Peter Boulding
> <pjbn...@unspampboulding.co.uk> wrote:
>
>
>> [2] A month's free snootiness points to anyone who claims to be
>> able to pronounce "Eyjafjallajokull".
>>
>

> http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Eyjafjallaj�kull
> .ogg
>
> HTH
>
>

Not at all. The Wikipedia article does offer a phonetic
representation of the pronunciation:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eyjafjallaj%C3%B6kull

If you want to get close, remember that double-l in Icelandic is
pronounced as a t sound followed by an l sound. People whose last
name is Hiller do not find this fact amusing.

--
Opus the Penguin
The best darn penguin in all of Usenet

Opus the Penguin

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Apr 15, 2010, 4:40:45 PM4/15/10
to
Nick Spalding (spal...@iol.ie) wrote:


Poor woman! That must be agonizing.

John Mc

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Apr 15, 2010, 5:44:30 PM4/15/10
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Yup, those were the good old days.

John Mc.

--
I always heard the road to Hell was paved with good intentions
But nobody told me it was a superhighway!

John Dean

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Apr 15, 2010, 6:27:39 PM4/15/10
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Not possible via ferry / train connections? Pig of a journey but I would
have thought doable.
--
John Dean
Oxford


John Dean

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Apr 15, 2010, 6:28:36 PM4/15/10
to

And in Italy all the trains were running on time. It was a dynamic age.
--
John Dean
Oxford


John Dean

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Apr 15, 2010, 6:31:27 PM4/15/10
to
Mark Brader wrote:
> Peter Boulding:
>> [2] A month's free snootiness points to anyone who claims to be able
>> to pronounce "Eyjafjallajokull".
>
> Am I the only who whose impression on seeing that word was that
> someone had made it up by typing random letters? 12 out of 17 are on
> the home row!

I believe there is a theory that the Icelandic language developed as a
consequence of Vikings trying to type letters home in Norwegian on a broken
typewriter.
--
John Dean
Oxford


John Hatpin

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Apr 15, 2010, 6:56:19 PM4/15/10
to
John Dean wrote:

MS Windows didn't crash back then, either.

Opus the Penguin

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Apr 16, 2010, 2:37:17 AM4/16/10
to
John Dean (john...@fraglineone.net) wrote:

> So, those people in Iceland are getting their own back for us
> trying to make them pay back the money their banks stole from our
> citizens. They've triggered the doomsday volcano scenario:
>
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8621407.stm
>
> All flights into and out of the country are stopped.
> People in the north of the country are reporting a smell of
> sulphur (but we think that may just be a lifestyle thing and
> unconnected to the DEATH FLOW SUFFOCATING ASH INCONVENIENT
> volcanic eruption.)
>

> Down here we're just hunkered down waiting for the pyroclastic
> flow. I've borrowed a couple of cats, stunned them with a rubber
> mallet and arranged them in artistic poses so our house will be
> Most Visited at the "Oxford went the same way as Pompeii"
> exhibition in a couple of years time.


Good thinking! But if you weren't consumed by the initial blast,
you're more like Herculaneum than Pompeii.

Peter Boulding

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Apr 16, 2010, 5:17:19 AM4/16/10
to
On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 06:37:17 GMT, Opus the Penguin
<opusthepen...@gmail.com> wrote in
<Xns9D5CF3C78E51op...@192.168.1.106>:

>> Down here we're just hunkered down waiting for the pyroclastic
>> flow. I've borrowed a couple of cats, stunned them with a rubber
>> mallet and arranged them in artistic poses so our house will be
>> Most Visited at the "Oxford went the same way as Pompeii"
>> exhibition in a couple of years time.

>Good thinking! But if you weren't consumed by the initial blast,
>you're more like Herculaneum than Pompeii.

A piece of volcano advice from the Grauniad:

If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it appears to
be floating in the air then its coming straight at you so start running.

Mark Brader

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Apr 16, 2010, 2:30:52 PM4/16/10
to
Peter Boulding:

> A piece of volcano advice from the Grauniad:
>
> If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it appears to
> be floating in the air then its coming straight at you so start running.

This works better as a rule for a pilot trying to avoid a mid-air
collision with another plane: the ones that are going to get you are
the ones you don't notice because they're a stationary dot against
the sky.

I say it "works better" because while airplanes mostly move in straight
lines, objects flying through the air on a ballistic trajectory don't.
Keep looking at that "stationary" chunk of lava and you'll see it start
descending and hit the ground in front of you.

Of course, (1) it might then hit you on the bounce, so running may be
prudent in any case; and (2) it might be too close for you to see it
start descending. But in case 2, you don't have time to run anyway.

The ones you most have to worry about are those that you first see
moving upward, but that motion is slowing to a stop as you watch.
If you see *that*, then start running for sure.

Oh, and if you do run, don't act like some idiot in a movie and run
directly away from something that's coming directly toward you faster
than you can run. Run *to one side*.
--
Mark Brader | "The job of an engineer is to build systems that
Toronto | people can trust. By this criterion, there
m...@vex.net | exist few software engineers." --John Shore

My text in this article is in the public domain.

Opus the Penguin

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Apr 16, 2010, 2:43:00 PM4/16/10
to
Mark Brader (m...@vex.net) wrote:

> The ones you most have to worry about are those that you first see
> moving upward, but that motion is slowing to a stop as you watch.
> If you see *that*, then start running for sure.
>
> Oh, and if you do run, don't act like some idiot in a movie and run
> directly away from something that's coming directly toward you faster
> than you can run. Run *to one side*.


I have printed out these instructions and will keep a copy in my wallet
for easy consultation when the time comes.

John Hatpin

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Apr 16, 2010, 2:40:39 PM4/16/10
to
Mark Brader wrote:

> Peter Boulding:
> > A piece of volcano advice from the Grauniad:
> >
> > If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it appears to
> > be floating in the air then its coming straight at you so start running.
>
> This works better as a rule for a pilot trying to avoid a mid-air
> collision with another plane: the ones that are going to get you are
> the ones you don't notice because they're a stationary dot against
> the sky.
>
> I say it "works better" because while airplanes mostly move in straight
> lines, objects flying through the air on a ballistic trajectory don't.
> Keep looking at that "stationary" chunk of lava and you'll see it start
> descending and hit the ground in front of you.
>
> Of course, (1) it might then hit you on the bounce, so running may be
> prudent in any case; and (2) it might be too close for you to see it
> start descending. But in case 2, you don't have time to run anyway.
>
> The ones you most have to worry about are those that you first see
> moving upward, but that motion is slowing to a stop as you watch.
> If you see *that*, then start running for sure.
>
> Oh, and if you do run, don't act like some idiot in a movie and run
> directly away from something that's coming directly toward you faster
> than you can run. Run *to one side*.

You sound like you have a lot of experience of running away from
objects travelling at speed towards you. I hesitate to ask why this is
such a common occurrence in your life.

Glenn Dowdy

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Apr 16, 2010, 2:49:57 PM4/16/10
to

"Opus the Penguin" <opusthepen...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9D5C8AA721049op...@192.168.1.106...

> Mark Brader (m...@vex.net) wrote:
>
>> The ones you most have to worry about are those that you first see
>> moving upward, but that motion is slowing to a stop as you watch.
>> If you see *that*, then start running for sure.
>>
>> Oh, and if you do run, don't act like some idiot in a movie and run
>> directly away from something that's coming directly toward you faster
>> than you can run. Run *to one side*.
>
>
> I have printed out these instructions and will keep a copy in my wallet
> for easy consultation when the time comes.
>
I advise keeping it in a windowed compartment to save valuable seconds.

Glenn D.


Opus the Penguin

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Apr 16, 2010, 3:23:30 PM4/16/10
to
Glenn Dowdy (glenn.n...@hp.spam.com) wrote:

That's a good idea. I'll print this post and put in my wallet as
well.

QueBarbara

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Apr 16, 2010, 3:50:07 PM4/16/10
to
On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 13:30:52 -0500, m...@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote:

>Oh, and if you do run, don't act like some idiot in a movie and run
>directly away from something that's coming directly toward you faster
>than you can run. Run *to one side*.

Serpentine! Serpentine!

--
QueBarbara

Mark Steese

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Apr 16, 2010, 3:53:46 PM4/16/10
to
m...@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in
news:aM2dnTvmAJxBMVXW...@vex.net:
[snip]

> Oh, and if you do run, don't act like some idiot in a movie and run
> directly away from something that's coming directly toward you faster
> than you can run. Run *to one side*.

Pfft. Next you'll be saying that if you're part of a group of ruffians who
have the hero hopelessly outnumbered, you should all attack him at once,
instead of attacking him one by one and getting clobbered. Where's the
sport in *that*?

Mark Brader

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Apr 16, 2010, 4:00:12 PM4/16/10
to
Mark Brader:

>> Oh, and if you do run, don't act like some idiot in a movie and run
>> directly away from something that's coming directly toward you faster
>> than you can run. Run *to one side*.

"QueBarbara":
> Serpentine! Serpentine!

Oh, right. (Goes back and runs away again.)
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "For want of a bit the loop was lost..."
m...@vex.net -- Steve Summit

David Friedman

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Apr 16, 2010, 4:43:49 PM4/16/10
to
In article <tnags5hanpnoo2bei...@4ax.com>,
Peter Boulding <pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk> wrote:

> If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it appears to
> be floating in the air then its coming straight at you so start running.


Works in a zero-g environment. Not so well elsewhere.

Peter Boulding

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Apr 16, 2010, 5:05:50 PM4/16/10
to
On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 13:43:49 -0700, David Friedman
<dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote in
<ddfr-215E8B.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com>:

>> If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it appears to
>> be floating in the air then its coming straight at you so start running.

>Works in a zero-g environment. Not so well elsewhere.

When you're heading straight for that star at 0.98C it goes on looking like
a fixed-size bright dot right until the last moment, when you're only a few
hundred thousand miles away and it's far too late to activate the lateral
thrusters.

--
Regards, Peter "er... should we veer to port or starboard?" Boulding

Hactar

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Apr 16, 2010, 4:22:47 PM4/16/10
to
In article <tofhs51istn059l8n...@4ax.com>,

What good is a rock right then?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine_group

--
-eben QebWe...@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81
Two atoms are walking along. Suddenly, one
stops. The other says, "What's wrong?" "I've lost
an electron." "Are you sure?" "I'm positive!"

John Hatpin

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Apr 16, 2010, 5:41:54 PM4/16/10
to
Peter Boulding wrote:

> On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 13:43:49 -0700, David Friedman
> <dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote in
> <ddfr-215E8B.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com>:
>
> >> If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it appears to
> >> be floating in the air then its coming straight at you so start running.
>
> >Works in a zero-g environment. Not so well elsewhere.
>
> When you're heading straight for that star at 0.98C it goes on looking like
> a fixed-size bright dot right until the last moment, when you're only a few
> hundred thousand miles away and it's far too late to activate the lateral
> thrusters.

You say that like it's a bad thing.

Dover Beach

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Apr 16, 2010, 5:47:10 PM4/16/10
to
QueBarbara <que.barb...@go-awaygmail.com> wrote in
news:tofhs51istn059l8n...@4ax.com:

I love that movie. The real one, not the remake.

--
Dover

David Friedman

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Apr 16, 2010, 6:15:02 PM4/16/10
to
In article <gvjhs5l8s2ra4clet...@4ax.com>,
Peter Boulding <pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk> wrote:

> On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 13:43:49 -0700, David Friedman
> <dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote in
> <ddfr-215E8B.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com>:
>
> >> If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it appears to
> >> be floating in the air then its coming straight at you so start running.
>
> >Works in a zero-g environment. Not so well elsewhere.
>
> When you're heading straight for that star at 0.98C it goes on looking like
> a fixed-size bright dot right until the last moment, when you're only a few
> hundred thousand miles away and it's far too late to activate the lateral
> thrusters.

Why doesn't it appear to be getting larger and brighter?

Mark Steese

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Apr 16, 2010, 6:47:34 PM4/16/10
to
David Friedman <dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote in
news:ddfr-5C4736.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com:

> In article <gvjhs5l8s2ra4clet...@4ax.com>,
> Peter Boulding <pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 13:43:49 -0700, David Friedman
>> <dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote in
>> <ddfr-215E8B.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com>:
>>
>> >> If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it
>> >> appears to be floating in the air then its coming straight at you
>> >> so start running.
>>
>> >Works in a zero-g environment. Not so well elsewhere.
>>
>> When you're heading straight for that star at 0.98C it goes on
>> looking like a fixed-size bright dot right until the last moment,
>> when you're only a few hundred thousand miles away and it's far too
>> late to activate the lateral thrusters.
>
> Why doesn't it appear to be getting larger and brighter?

He was approaching it from the other side.
--
At the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893, a very curious figure stood
in the California State Building: a medieval knight in armor, mounted on
a horse, composed entirely of prunes. -Douglas Sackman

QueBarbara

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Apr 16, 2010, 8:01:03 PM4/16/10
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On 16 Apr 2010 21:47:10 GMT, Dover Beach <moon.b...@gmail.com>
wrote:

That line in particular has been a family in-joke for years. We need
some new young un's to come along to yell it at.

> The real one, not the remake.

Sacrebleu! I've not seen it, and will not.

--
QueBarbara

Hactar

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Apr 16, 2010, 7:33:54 PM4/16/10
to
In article <ddfr-5C4736.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com>,

David Friedman <dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote:
> In article <gvjhs5l8s2ra4clet...@4ax.com>,
> Peter Boulding <pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk> wrote:
>
> > On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 13:43:49 -0700, David Friedman
> > <dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote in
> > <ddfr-215E8B.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com>:
> >
> > >> If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it appears to
> > >> be floating in the air then its coming straight at you so start running.
> >
> > >Works in a zero-g environment. Not so well elsewhere.
> >
> > When you're heading straight for that star at 0.98C it goes on looking like
> > a fixed-size bright dot right until the last moment, when you're only a few
> > hundred thousand miles away and it's far too late to activate the lateral
> > thrusters.
>
> Why doesn't it appear to be getting larger and brighter?

I suspect it does so significantly only at the end. Of course, the
whole time it's blue-shifted by z=-8.5 or so (or -10.5).

--
The powers in charge keep us in a continuous stampede of patriotic
fervor with the cry of national emergency. Always there has been some
terrible evil to gobble us up if we did not furnish the sums demanded.
Yet these disasters seem never to have been quite real. -- MacArthur (attr)

David Friedman

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Apr 16, 2010, 8:43:15 PM4/16/10
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In article <2o8n97-...@pc.home>, ebenZ...@verizon.net (Hactar)
wrote:

> In article <ddfr-5C4736.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com>,
> David Friedman <dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote:
> > In article <gvjhs5l8s2ra4clet...@4ax.com>,
> > Peter Boulding <pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk> wrote:
> >
> > > On Fri, 16 Apr 2010 13:43:49 -0700, David Friedman
> > > <dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote in
> > > <ddfr-215E8B.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com>:
> > >
> > > >> If a piece of lava appears to be moving it won't hit you. If it
> > > >> appears to
> > > >> be floating in the air then its coming straight at you so start
> > > >> running.
> > >
> > > >Works in a zero-g environment. Not so well elsewhere.
> > >
> > > When you're heading straight for that star at 0.98C it goes on looking
> > > like
> > > a fixed-size bright dot right until the last moment, when you're only a
> > > few
> > > hundred thousand miles away and it's far too late to activate the lateral
> > > thrusters.
> >
> > Why doesn't it appear to be getting larger and brighter?
>
> I suspect it does so significantly only at the end. Of course, the
> whole time it's blue-shifted by z=-8.5 or so (or -10.5).

The earth is about eight light minutes from the sun, and the sun looks a
lot brighter than other stars from here.

Hactar

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Apr 16, 2010, 9:22:50 PM4/16/10
to
In article <ddfr-6158D8.1...@newsfarm.phx.highwinds-media.com>,

OK, suppose you notice your ill-fated course when you're 5 AU (aka 40
light-minutes; how far in travel time, 40*9.5 minutes?) from hitting
the star and you hit your lateral thrusters then. Is that enough lead
time to miss the star at enough distance you don't get cooked? I think
you might also want to reverse thrust, but maybe not if that diverts power
from the laterals.

--
-eben QebWe...@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81

He who will not reason is a bigot; he who cannot is a fool;
and he who dares not is a slave. -Sir William Drummond

David Friedman

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Apr 16, 2010, 10:51:54 PM4/16/10