More on naming children

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John Hatpin

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Sep 8, 2009, 9:43:08 AM9/8/09
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(The subject title can easily be misheard.)

"Teachers spot trouble in a name"
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm

"Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
looking at their names, a survey suggests.

The poll of 3,000 teachers found more than one in three expected
pupils with certain names to be more disruptive.

Pupils called Callum, Connor, Jack, Chelsea, Courtney and Chardonnay
were among some of the ones to watch. [...]

The survey also asked teachers what the brightest children tended to
be called, with Alexander, Adam, Christopher, Benjamin, Edward,
Elizabeth, Charlotte, Emma, Hannah and Rebecca coming in as the
brainiest names."

Any similarity with the situation LeftPondSide vis-a-vis names?
--
John Hatpin
http://uninformedcomment.wordpress.com/

Arthur

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Sep 8, 2009, 9:52:38 AM9/8/09
to
On Sep 8, 9:43 am, John Hatpin

<RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:
> (The subject title can easily be misheard.)
>
> "Teachers spot trouble in a name"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm
>
> "Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
> looking at their names, a survey suggests.
>
> The poll of 3,000 teachers found more than one in three expected
> pupils with certain names to be more disruptive.
>
> Pupils called Callum, Connor, Jack, Chelsea, Courtney and Chardonnay
> were among some of the ones to watch. [...]

Chardonnay? I'll bet the other children treat her(?) Chablis.
But if she befriends Jack, you can have wine and cheese.

Richard R. Hershberger

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Sep 8, 2009, 9:58:08 AM9/8/09
to
On Sep 8, 9:43 am, John Hatpin
<RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:

That list seems pretty random to me on both counts (other than the
name "Rebecca" being a sure sign of genius, of course). My guess is
that these are class markers. The "smart"names seem to be traditional
English Christian names, while the "ones to watch" are, with the
exception of "Jack", Irish or non-traditional. Names corellate to
class in the U.S. as well, but not the same names. I have been told,
for example, that "Sharon" is strictly lower class in Britain, while
it holds no such association here.

Richard R. Hershberger

Les Albert

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Sep 8, 2009, 10:56:50 AM9/8/09
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On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 06:58:08 -0700 (PDT), "Richard R. Hershberger"
<rrh...@acme.com> wrote:
>On Sep 8, 9:43�am, John Hatpin
><RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:

>> (The subject title can easily be misheard.)
>> "Teachers spot trouble in a name"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm
>> "Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
>> looking at their names, a survey suggests.
>> The poll of 3,000 teachers found more than one in three expected
>> pupils with certain names to be more disruptive.
>> Pupils called Callum, Connor, Jack, Chelsea, Courtney and Chardonnay
>> were among some of the ones to watch. [...]
>> The survey also asked teachers what the brightest children tended to
>> be called, with Alexander, Adam, Christopher, Benjamin, Edward,
>> Elizabeth, Charlotte, Emma, Hannah and Rebecca coming in as the
>> brainiest names."
>> Any similarity with the situation LeftPondSide vis-a-vis names?

>That list seems pretty random to me on both counts (other than the
>name "Rebecca" being a sure sign of genius, of course). My guess is
>that these are class markers. The "smart"names seem to be traditional
>English Christian names, while the "ones to watch" are, with the
>exception of "Jack", Irish or non-traditional. Names corellate to
>class in the U.S. as well, but not the same names. I have been told,
>for example, that "Sharon" is strictly lower class in Britain, while
>it holds no such association here.


What are some of the names that indicate upper and lower class in the
U.S.?

Les

Boron Elgar

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:11:56 AM9/8/09
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On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 07:56:50 -0700, Les Albert <lalb...@aol.com>
wrote:


Have you ever met a kid named "Trailer Trash"?

Boron

Mr C

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:15:20 AM9/8/09
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On Sep 8, 10:43 pm, John Hatpin

It was a meme at my old, old school to keep an eye on kids whose names
started with "J".

Sorry, John.


Mr C

Mr C

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:17:22 AM9/8/09
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On Sep 9, 12:11 am, Boron Elgar <boron_el...@hootmail.com> wrote:
> On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 07:56:50 -0700, Les Albert <lalbe...@aol.com>
Middle initial?


Mr C

Boron Elgar

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:28:05 AM9/8/09
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On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 08:17:22 -0700 (PDT), Mr C <cams...@gmail.com>
wrote:

G, for "Glorious," because my mom said having me was such a glorious
experience (that is from a friend of mine who met this student while
substitute teaching).

Boron

Les Albert

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:33:38 AM9/8/09
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>>> Have you ever met a kid named "Trailer Trash"?

>>Middle initial?

>G, for "Glorious," because my mom said having me was such a glorious


>experience (that is from a friend of mine who met this student while
>substitute teaching).


So the student's full name was Trailer Glorious Trash?

Les


Les Albert

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:35:02 AM9/8/09
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>Have you ever met a kid named "Trailer Trash"?


Yes, but he lived in a double-wide trailer, so he was considered upper
class in the trailer park.

Les


Richard R. Hershberger

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:41:53 AM9/8/09
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Look at the names of the children and grandchildren of the Palin
family for lower class (which, to point out the obvious, is distinct
from "poor"). Upper class is trickier, if only because defining
"upper class" in the U.S. context is tricky. I don't know what the
scions of the Rockefellers and the Lowells are naming their kids
nowadays. If forced to guess, mine would be that they largely stick
to traditional English Christian names.

Richard R. Hershberger

Veronique

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:44:35 AM9/8/09
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I'm too lazy to do it myself, but what are the first names of the
Fortune 500 CEOs? Or the regents of the UC system?


V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep

Les Albert

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:55:12 AM9/8/09
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The UC regents have no unusual names except for Oddessa Johnson and
Hadi Makarechian. All the other names are plain vanilla:

www.universityofcalifornia.edu/regents/contact.html

Les


Hactar

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Sep 8, 2009, 11:18:49 AM9/8/09
to
In article <7db9ed67-832c-4676...@y21g2000yqn.googlegroups.com>,

Richard R. Hershberger <rrh...@acme.com> wrote:
> On Sep 8, 9:43�am, John Hatpin
> <RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:
> > (The subject title can easily be misheard.)
> >
> > "Teachers spot trouble in a
> name"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm
> >
> > "Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
> > looking at their names, a survey suggests.

Yeah, people have a lot of crazy ideas. Ask a nurse or policeman about
lunar cycles sometime.

> I have been told, for example, that "Sharon" is strictly lower class in
> Britain, while it holds no such association here.

So in the song "I Ain't Sharin' Sharon", what can we assume about the
(presumably Australian) Sharon?

--
-eben QebWe...@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity,
and I'm not sure about the former." -- Albert Einstein

Boron Elgar

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Sep 8, 2009, 12:26:36 PM9/8/09
to
On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 08:33:38 -0700, Les Albert <lalb...@aol.com>
wrote:

>On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 11:28:05 -0400, Boron Elgar


><boron...@hootmail.com> wrote:
>>On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 08:17:22 -0700 (PDT), Mr C <cams...@gmail.com>
>>wrote:

>>>On Sep 9, 12:11�ソスam, Boron Elgar <boron_el...@hootmail.com> wrote:
>>>> On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 07:56:50 -0700, Les Albert <lalbe...@aol.com>
>>>> wrote:
>>>> >On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 06:58:08 -0700 (PDT), "Richard R. Hershberger"
>>>> ><rrhe...@acme.com> wrote:

>>>> >>On Sep 8, 9:43�ソスam, John Hatpin


>>>> >><RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:
>
>>>> >>> (The subject title can easily be misheard.)
>>>> >>> "Teachers spot trouble in a name"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm
>>>> >>> "Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
>>>> >>> looking at their names, a survey suggests.
>>>> >>> The poll of 3,000 teachers found more than one in three expected
>>>> >>> pupils with certain names to be more disruptive.
>>>> >>> Pupils called Callum, Connor, Jack, Chelsea, Courtney and Chardonnay
>>>> >>> were among some of the ones to watch. [...]
>>>> >>> The survey also asked teachers what the brightest children tended to
>>>> >>> be called, with Alexander, Adam, Christopher, Benjamin, Edward,
>>>> >>> Elizabeth, Charlotte, Emma, Hannah and Rebecca coming in as the
>>>> >>> brainiest names."
>>>> >>> Any similarity with the situation LeftPondSide vis-a-vis names?
>
>>>> >>That list seems pretty random to me on both counts (other than the

>>>> >>name "Rebecca" being a sure sign of genius, of course). �ソスMy guess is
>>>> >>that these are class markers. �ソスThe "smart"names seem to be traditional


>>>> >>English Christian names, while the "ones to watch" are, with the

>>>> >>exception of "Jack", Irish or non-traditional. �ソスNames corellate to
>>>> >>class in the U.S. as well, but not the same names. �ソスI have been told,


>>>> >>for example, that "Sharon" is strictly lower class in Britain, while
>>>> >>it holds no such association here.
>
>>>> >What are some of the names that indicate upper and lower class in the

>>>> >U.S.? �ソス


>
>
>>>> Have you ever met a kid named "Trailer Trash"?
>
>>>Middle initial?
>
>>G, for "Glorious," because my mom said having me was such a glorious
>>experience (that is from a friend of mine who met this student while
>>substitute teaching).
>
>
>So the student's full name was Trailer Glorious Trash?
>
>Les
>

Yeah, Les, that must have been it.

John Hatpin

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Sep 8, 2009, 12:49:10 PM9/8/09
to
Mr C wrote:

> On Sep 8, 10:43�pm, John Hatpin
> <RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:
> > (The subject title can easily be misheard.)
> >
> > "Teachers spot trouble in a name"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm
> >
> > "Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
> > looking at their names, a survey suggests.
> >
> > The poll of 3,000 teachers found more than one in three expected
> > pupils with certain names to be more disruptive.
> >
> > Pupils called Callum, Connor, Jack, Chelsea, Courtney and Chardonnay
> > were among some of the ones to watch. [...]
> >
> > The survey also asked teachers what the brightest children tended to
> > be called, with Alexander, Adam, Christopher, Benjamin, Edward,
> > Elizabeth, Charlotte, Emma, Hannah and Rebecca coming in as the
> > brainiest names."
> >
> > Any similarity with the situation LeftPondSide vis-a-vis names?
>

> It was a meme at my old, old school to keep an eye on kids whose names
> started with "J".
>
> Sorry, John.

No apology necessary. My teachers certainly had to keep a close eye
on me, I can tell you. Otherwise, I might walk absentmindedly into
traffic, forget my clothes, or simply fall over without being pushed.

David Friedman

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Sep 8, 2009, 12:53:44 PM9/8/09
to
In article
<7db9ed67-832c-4676...@y21g2000yqn.googlegroups.com>,
"Richard R. Hershberger" <rrh...@acme.com> wrote:

> On Sep 8, 9:43�am, John Hatpin
> <RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:
> > (The subject title can easily be misheard.)
> >
> > "Teachers spot trouble in a
> > name"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm
> >
> > "Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
> > looking at their names, a survey suggests.
> >
> > The poll of 3,000 teachers found more than one in three expected
> > pupils with certain names to be more disruptive.
> >
> > Pupils called Callum, Connor, Jack, Chelsea, Courtney and Chardonnay
> > were among some of the ones to watch. [...]
> >
> > The survey also asked teachers what the brightest children tended to
> > be called, with Alexander, Adam, Christopher, Benjamin, Edward,
> > Elizabeth, Charlotte, Emma, Hannah and Rebecca coming in as the
> > brainiest names."
> >
> > Any similarity with the situation LeftPondSide vis-a-vis names?
> > --
> > John Hatpinhttp://uninformedcomment.wordpress.com/
>
> That list seems pretty random to me on both counts (other than the
> name "Rebecca" being a sure sign of genius, of course).

How did you know?

--
http://www.daviddfriedman.com/ http://daviddfriedman.blogspot.com/
Author of
_Future Imperfect: Technology and Freedom in an Uncertain World_,
Cambridge University Press.

Pierre Jelenc

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Sep 8, 2009, 1:18:11 PM9/8/09
to
Les Albert <lalb...@aol.com> writes:
>
> Yes, but he lived in a double-wide trailer, so he was considered upper
> class in the trailer park.

Ooh, Amy Speace!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edhGIJmAyDo (band with Trina Hamlin)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MpcAuI--tMI (solo at the Living Room)

Pierre
--
Pierre Jelenc
The Gigometer www.gigometer.com
The NYC Beer Guide www.nycbeer.org

Dana Carpender

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Sep 8, 2009, 2:04:02 PM9/8/09
to


Around here, for example, Tonya seems to be a name that blue collar
country folks use, also Crystal. Cody for boys, or Dwayne. I've never
met a rich kid named Dwayne.

If a kid has an Anglo-type last name as a first name, he's likely prep
school material. I knew a Whitsun McNulty back in Lake Forest,
seriously big money. Also a drunk, at least when I knew him. Rapidly
progressing from Whit to half-Whit.

In general, I see less of the whole "creative naming" phenomenon among
the upper class, though rich Hollywood types appear to be the exception.

Dana

Charles Wm. Dimmick

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Sep 8, 2009, 2:58:33 PM9/8/09
to

Thinking back on my 40 years of teaching, I have negative correlations
with Benjamin and Marty and positive correlations with Elizabeth and
Priscilla. But almost all other names are neutral.

Charles

Nick Spalding

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Sep 8, 2009, 3:16:50 PM9/8/09
to
Dana Carpender wrote, in <h866am$3bu$1...@news.eternal-september.org>
on Tue, 08 Sep 2009 14:04:02 -0400:

What possible connection is there between 'rich Hollywood types' and
'upper class'?
--
Nick Spalding

Lee Ayrton

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Sep 8, 2009, 2:53:06 PM9/8/09
to
On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 11:18:49 -0400, Hactar wrote:

> In article <7db9ed67-832c-4676...@y21g2000yqn.googlegroups.com>,
> Richard R. Hershberger <rrh...@acme.com> wrote:
>> On Sep 8, 9:43�am, John Hatpin
>> <RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:
>> > (The subject title can easily be misheard.)
>> >
>> > "Teachers spot trouble in a
>> name"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm
>> >
>> > "Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
>> > looking at their names, a survey suggests.
>
> Yeah, people have a lot of crazy ideas. Ask a nurse or policeman about
> lunar cycles sometime.

Yeah, well, speaking as a former nurse I can testify that it's true. More
births, for example, occur within 2 weeks of a new or full moon.


John Hatpin

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Sep 8, 2009, 3:40:33 PM9/8/09
to
Hactar wrote:

> In article <7db9ed67-832c-4676...@y21g2000yqn.googlegroups.com>,
> Richard R. Hershberger <rrh...@acme.com> wrote:
> > On Sep 8, 9:43�am, John Hatpin
> > <RemoveThisjfhop...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:
> > > (The subject title can easily be misheard.)
> > >
> > > "Teachers spot trouble in a
> > name"http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm
> > >
> > > "Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
> > > looking at their names, a survey suggests.
>
> Yeah, people have a lot of crazy ideas. Ask a nurse or policeman about
> lunar cycles sometime.

Is it so difficult to believe in a possible silly name->stupid
parent->troublesome kid correlation?

Lee Ayrton

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Sep 8, 2009, 3:01:48 PM9/8/09
to

I wonder what the classroom behavior expectations for Moon Unit and
Dweezil were?


Lee "A Rose by any other name can swill tout suite" Ayrton

Opus the Penguin

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Sep 8, 2009, 3:54:22 PM9/8/09
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Les Albert (lalb...@aol.com) wrote:

No, silly. Boron's friend was named Food Food.

--
Opus the Penguin
Think what you will of the man, but you have to give him credit where
it's due - he got really sick. - One of the Bob Gearys

Opus the Penguin

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Sep 8, 2009, 3:54:23 PM9/8/09
to
Nick Spalding (spal...@iol.ie) wrote:
> Dana Carpender wrote, in <h866am$3bu$1...@news.eternal-september.org>:

>
>>
>> In general, I see less of the whole "creative naming" phenomenon
>> among the upper class, though rich Hollywood types appear to be
>> the exception.
>
> What possible connection is there between 'rich Hollywood types'
> and 'upper class'?


Money!

--
Opus the Penguin
Cats and "acts normally" are a nearly tangential intersection on a VERY
enlarged Venn diagram. - Robert Crowe

Lee Ayrton

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Sep 8, 2009, 3:22:22 PM9/8/09
to
On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 14:43:08 +0100, John Hatpin wrote:

> (The subject title can easily be misheard.)
>
> "Teachers spot trouble in a name"
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8243684.stm
>
> "Teachers think they can tell which pupils are likely to play up by
> looking at their names, a survey suggests.
>
> The poll of 3,000 teachers found more than one in three expected
> pupils with certain names to be more disruptive.
>
> Pupils called Callum, Connor, Jack, Chelsea, Courtney and Chardonnay
> were among some of the ones to watch. [...]
>
> The survey also asked teachers what the brightest children tended to
> be called, with Alexander, Adam, Christopher, Benjamin, Edward,
> Elizabeth, Charlotte, Emma, Hannah and Rebecca coming in as the
> brainiest names."
>
> Any similarity with the situation LeftPondSide vis-a-vis names?

Two articles:

http://educationalissues.suite101.com/article.cfm/how_important_are_childrens_names

Summarizes a study published in March 2009 of "Social Science Quarterly"
which suggests that unusual or oddly-spelled names are a social burden on
children and that this may cause behavior problems. "Basically, if
you're teased mercilessly your entire childhood for your name, you
become an angry, bitter person, and you lash out in a way that could be
negative."


http://www.scribd.com/doc/11486943/First-Names-and-Crime-Does-Unpopularity-Spell-Trouble

A 1993 US study that correlated first names, socio-economic status and
juvenile deliquency. The study showed a positive correlation for
unpopular names and juvenile deliquency. "Unpopular names are likely not
the cause of crime but correlated with factors that increase the tendency
towards juvenile deliquency [...]"

So, bias and prejudice aside, there might be a bit of fact behind the name
and expectation thing. Of course, it could be expectation and name thing,
too.


Les Albert

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Sep 8, 2009, 5:27:43 PM9/8/09
to


Food Food and Glorious made me think of
-----------------------------------------------------------
The Hippopotamus Song

A bold hippopotamus was standing one day
On the banks of the cool Shalimar.
He gazed at the bottom as he peacefully lay
By the light of the evening star.
Away on the hilltop sat combing her hair
His fair hippopotami maid.
The hippopotamus was no ignoramus
And sang her this sweet serenade

Chorus:
Mud, mud, glorious mud
Nothing quite like it for cooling the blood
So follow me follow, down to the hollow
And there let me wallow in glorious mud.
The fair hippopotama he aimed to entice
From her seat on that hilltop above.
As she hadn't got a ma to give her advice
Came tiptoeing down to her love.
Like thunder the forest re-echoed the sound
Of the song that they sang when they met.
His inamorata adjusted her garter
And lifted her voice in duet

Mud, mud, glorious mud ....
----------------------------------------------------
More lyrics to this song by Flanders and Swann at:

www.poppyfields.net/poppy/songs/hippopotamus.html

Les


David Friedman

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Sep 8, 2009, 5:41:03 PM9/8/09
to
In article <h866am$3bu$1...@news.eternal-september.org>,
Dana Carpender <dcar...@kivanospam.net> wrote:

> In general, I see less of the whole "creative naming" phenomenon among
> the upper class, though rich Hollywood types appear to be the exception.
>

I read an article not long ago which argued, if I remember correctly,
that the practice of inventing an (often unique) name for a child was
common mostly in black culture. I think relatively lower class black
culture, but I may be misremembering that part.

John Hatpin

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Sep 8, 2009, 5:43:07 PM9/8/09
to
Opus the Penguin wrote:

Or The Twelfth.

(It's a British hunting joke. You won't get it unless you're hunting
the British.)

HVS

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Sep 8, 2009, 5:46:20 PM9/8/09
to
On 08 Sep 2009, Les Albert wrote

-snip-

I've always loved this song, and used to play/sing it at the piano
along with a bunch of other Flanders & Swann (and most of Tom
Lehrer).

Wonderful stuff -- may I annotate?


> Food Food and Glorious made me think of
> -----------------------------------------------------------
> The Hippopotamus Song
>
> A bold hippopotamus was standing one day
> On the banks of the cool Shalimar.
> He gazed at the bottom as he peacefully lay
> By the light of the evening star.
> Away on the hilltop sat combing her hair
> His fair hippopotami maid.
> The hippopotamus was no ignoramus

What a nice rhyme; it's like Flanders's intro to The Sloth
("...the slawth, or slothe if you use bawth pronunciations")

> And sang her this sweet serenade
>
> Chorus:
> Mud, mud, glorious mud
> Nothing quite like it for cooling the blood
> So follow me follow, down to the hollow
> And there let me wallow in glorious mud.

> The fair hippopotama he aimed to entice
> From her seat on that hilltop above.
> As she hadn't got a ma to give her advice

Almost -- not quite, but getting there -- at the level of Parker's
"You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her think".

> Came tiptoeing down to her love.
> Like thunder the forest re-echoed the sound
> Of the song that they sang when they met.
> His inamorata adjusted her garter

I really like this rhyme -- a generic BrE rhyme which doesn't work
at all if (like me) you grew up pronouncing your terminal r's.



> And lifted her voice in duet
>
> Mud, mud, glorious mud ....
> ----------------------------------------------------
> More lyrics to this song by Flanders and Swann at:
>
> www.poppyfields.net/poppy/songs/hippopotamus.html
>
> Les
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

--
Cheers,
Harvey

John Hatpin

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Sep 8, 2009, 5:47:01 PM9/8/09
to
Lee Ayrton wrote:

I doubt they were common enough names to generate any behavioural
expectations. It's not about silly names - I was wrong to use that
phrase just there - it's about the relationship between some quite
common names and parents' attitudes.

David Friedman

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Sep 8, 2009, 5:48:28 PM9/8/09
to
In article
<c0fb6e76-03bf-4908...@x5g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
Veronique <veroniq...@gmail.com> wrote:

For the Fortune 1000, the list starts:

Adams, K.S. Jr.
Adelson, Sheldon G.
Adkerson, Richard C.
Aguirre, Fernando
Alario, Richard J.
Alesio, Steven W.
Alexander, Anthony J.
Allison, Herbert M. Jr.
Allott, Anthony J.
Altabef, Peter A.
Amen, Robert M.
Amos, Daniel P.
Anastasio, Curtis V.
Anderson, Bradbury H
Anderson, Richard H.
Anderson, David R.
Anderson, R. John
Anderson, Michael J.
Angel, Stephen F.
Anthony, Richard E.
Appleton, Steven R.
Archibald, Nolan D.
Armes, Roy V.
Armstrong, Greg L.
Arpey, Gerard J.
Askren, Stanley A.
Assadi, Mehran
Atkin, Jerry C.
Ayer, Ramani
Ayer, William S.
Beauchamp, Robert E.
Begley, Christopher B.
Belk, Thomas M. Jr.
Benante, Martin R.
Bennett, Michael L.
Berce, Daniel E.
Bergman, Stanley M.
Bergren, Byron L.
Berkett, Neil
Berkley, William R.
Bernhard, James M. Jr.
Best, Robert W.
Bettinger, Walter W. II
Bewkes, Jeffrey L.
Beyer, Richard M.
Bezos, Jeffrey P.
Binder, Jeffrey R.
Bisaro, Paul M.
Black, Jeffrey P.
Blackburn, John D.
Blair, David T.
Blake, Francis S.
Blankenship, Don L.
Blankfein, Lloyd C.
Blodgett, Lynn R.
Bluedorn, Todd M.
Boeckmann, Alan L.
Boehne, Richard A.
Bohn, Robert G.
Boots, Ira G.
Boyce, Gregory H.
Boyd, Jeffery H.
Bracken, Richard M.
Brady, Robert T.
Braly, Angela F.
Bramanti, Frank J.
Bready, Richard L.
Brennan, Robert T.
Bresky, Steven J.
Brock, John F.
Bronfman, Edgar Jr.
Brooks, Douglas H.
Broussard, Bruce D.
Brown, Gregory Q.
Brown, Jack H.
Buck, Robert R.
Buckley, George W.
Buffett, Warren E.
Bunch, Charles E.
Burd, Steven A.
Burgess, Mark S.
Burke, Kevin
Burke, Thomas A.
Burton, Robert G. Sr.
Burzik, Catherine M.
Busse, Keith E.
Butler, Gary C.

http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune500/2009/ceos/B.html

A lot are traditional English Christian first names, but far from all.

HVS

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Sep 8, 2009, 5:49:43 PM9/8/09
to
On 08 Sep 2009, John Hatpin wrote

Eric Partridge probably included it under rhyming slang for
"scouse".

--
Cheers,
Harvey

David Friedman

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Sep 8, 2009, 5:50:58 PM9/8/09
to
In article <hncda5llcqli7t645...@4ax.com>,
John Hatpin <RemoveThi...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:

Or, alternatively, a name-->class/ethnicity-->behavior correlation?
Different subpopulation are quite likely to have different norms of
behavior.

David Friedman

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Sep 8, 2009, 5:51:43 PM9/8/09
to
In article <h86boj$l0d$2...@reader1.panix.com>,
Lee Ayrton <lay...@panix.com> wrote:

All of them, I would think.

Peter Boulding

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Sep 8, 2009, 6:08:52 PM9/8/09
to
On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 08:15:20 -0700 (PDT), Mr C <cams...@gmail.com> wrote in
<cf6f767e-9563-447c...@v23g2000pro.googlegroups.com>:

>It was a meme at my old, old school to keep an eye on kids whose names
>started with "J".

My schoolteacher ex, when taking a first look at a new class list, would
dread the appearance of Jasons and Tracys.

--
Regards, Peter Boulding
pjbn...@UNSPAMpboulding.co.uk (to e-mail, remove "UNSPAM")
Fractal Music and Images: http://www.pboulding.co.uk/ and
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=794240&content=music

Jerry Bauer

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Sep 8, 2009, 6:10:26 PM9/8/09
to
David Friedman <dd...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com> wrote:

> In article <h86boj$l0d$2...@reader1.panix.com>,
> Lee Ayrton <lay...@panix.com> wrote:
>

<<<...>>>


> > Yeah, well, speaking as a former nurse I can testify that it's true. More
> > births, for example, occur within 2 weeks of a new or full moon.
>
> All of them, I would think.

Greg, stop posting through David's account.


Charles Wm. Dimmick

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Sep 8, 2009, 6:13:21 PM9/8/09
to
Les Albert wrote:
> On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 08:44:35 -0700 (PDT), Veronique

> <veroniq...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Sep 8, 8:41 am, "Richard R. Hershberger" <rrhe...@acme.com> wrote:
>>> On Sep 8, 10:56 am, Les Albert <lalbe...@aol.com> wrote:
>
>>>> What are some of the names that indicate upper and lower class in the
>>>> U.S.?
>
>>> Look at the names of the children and grandchildren of the Palin
>>> family for lower class (which, to point out the obvious, is distinct
>>> from "poor"). Upper class is trickier, if only because defining
>>> "upper class" in the U.S. context is tricky. I don't know what the
>>> scions of the Rockefellers and the Lowells are naming their kids
>>> nowadays. If forced to guess, mine would be that they largely stick
>>> to traditional English Christian names.
>
>> I'm too lazy to do it myself, but what are the first names of the
>> Fortune 500 CEOs? Or the regents of the UC system?
>
>
>
> The UC regents have no unusual names except for Oddessa Johnson and
> Hadi Makarechian. All the other names are plain vanilla:
>
> www.universityofcalifornia.edu/regents/contact.html

Or you could try the Forbes 400:

http://www.forbes.com/lists/2008/54/400list08_The-400-Richest-Americans_Rank.html

Charles

David Friedman

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Sep 8, 2009, 6:31:35 PM9/8/09
to
In article <h86kua$tp7$1...@news.eternal-september.org>,

"Charles Wm. Dimmick" <cdim...@snet.net> wrote:

I like that list. Lots of Davids.

Dana Carpender

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Sep 8, 2009, 6:43:22 PM9/8/09
to


You forget, dear, that this is the US, where at least some semblance of
class mobility can be purchased.

Dana

Ted The Cat

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Sep 8, 2009, 6:52:07 PM9/8/09
to

There was a fad among poor white rednecks in Oklahoma for the name
Misty Dawn about 25 years ago.

Les Albert

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Sep 8, 2009, 7:53:52 PM9/8/09
to
On Tue, 08 Sep 2009 22:46:20 +0100, HVS <use...@REMOVETHISwhhvs.co.uk>
wrote:

I saw Flanders and Swann when they did their show, "At the Drop of a
Hat", in N.Y.C. many years ago. Great stuff!

Les

Mac

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Sep 8, 2009, 8:44:36 PM9/8/09
to

I hope it includes the sequel:

The amorous hippopotamus, whose love song we lnow,
Is now married, and father of ten.
He murmurs "God rot 'em" as he watches them grow,
And he longs to be single again.

Veronique

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Sep 8, 2009, 8:50:55 PM9/8/09
to
On Sep 8, 2:48 pm, David Friedman <d...@daviddfriedman.nopsam.com>
wrote:
> In article
> <c0fb6e76-03bf-4908-9066-6a5be44da...@x5g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,


I'm not seeing, either on that list, ChasotE's Forbes 400 list, or the
list of UC Regents, any names I'd consider "Kreeyatif", although some
are definitely foreign (and I have no way to evaluate whether "Sergey"
is equivalent to "David" or "Chylar", to pull a name from the Mormon
Baby List, for example.)


V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep

Veronique

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Sep 8, 2009, 8:57:04 PM9/8/09