Some jokes write themselves.

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Chris

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Nov 9, 2010, 11:36:59 AM11/9/10
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From today's Daily Telegraph website readers comments.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/8118823/Large-cardinals-maths-shaken-by-the-unprovable.html

<rogerus>
"Back in the days when north American Indians lived in teepees, there were
three ladies who were pregnant, and they all gave birth on the same day. It
was the custom to be on an animal skin when this occurred.
The lady on the Elk skin had a son.
The lady on the Deer skin had a daughter, and the one on the Hippopotamus
skin gave birth to a son and daughter.
This went to prove that:
The squaw on the Hippopotamus was equal to the sum of the squaws on the
other two hides."


<soozee>
"Were there hippopotamuses in North American then ?"


Sheesh!

Veronique

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Nov 9, 2010, 1:15:16 PM11/9/10
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On Nov 9, 8:36 am, "Chris" <ch...@chris.invalid> wrote:
> From today's Daily Telegraph website readers comments.http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/8118823/Large-cardinals-maths-shak...

>
> <rogerus>
> "Back in the days when north American Indians lived in teepees, there were
> three ladies who were pregnant, and they all gave birth on the same day. It
> was the custom to be on an animal skin when this occurred.
> The lady on the Elk skin had a son.
> The lady on the Deer skin had a daughter, and the one on the Hippopotamus
> skin gave birth to a son and daughter.
> This went to prove that:
> The squaw on the Hippopotamus was equal to the sum of the squaws on the
> other two hides."
>
> <soozee>
> "Were there hippopotamuses in North American then ?"


Sadly, were the joke to contain an equid, or even a rhinoceros, it
would work. But if you can transplant it to Africa (where hippos
evolved and mostly stayed), with maybe a zebra and giraffe hide?


V.
--
Veronique Chez Sheep

Don K

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Nov 9, 2010, 3:06:47 PM11/9/10
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"Veronique" <veroniq...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:227b1a00-b624-4c31...@w30g2000prj.googlegroups.com...


What's the likelihood of finding 3 pregnant squaws on safari in Africa?

Don


Chris

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Nov 9, 2010, 3:23:59 PM11/9/10
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"Veronique" <veroniq...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:227b1a00-b624-4c31...@w30g2000prj.googlegroups.com...
On Nov 9, 8:36 am, "Chris" <ch...@chris.invalid> wrote:
>> From today's Daily Telegraph website readers
>> comments.http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/8118823/Large-cardinals-maths-shak...
>
<Snip old joke>

>
>> <soozee>
>> "Were there hippopotamuses in North American then ?"


>Sadly, were the joke to contain an equid, or even a rhinoceros, it
>would work. But if you can transplant it to Africa (where hippos
>evolved and mostly stayed), with maybe a zebra and giraffe hide?

Sadly, I was referring to soozee asking if there were hippo's in the US.

And just for you.
http://www.cafepress.com/+at_least_my_sheep_loves_me_shirt,64291490

Mark Brader

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Nov 9, 2010, 3:30:38 PM11/9/10
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"Chris":

> ...The squaw on the Hippopotamus was equal to the sum of the squaws


> on the other two hides.

When I heard that one 35-40 years ago, it was "The son of the squaw
on the hippopotamus is equal to the son of the squaws on the other
two hides". This matches the circumstances of the joke better
(in this version she has one son who's as heavy as the other two
put together), but the actual theorem less well. I still think it
works better, since the mismatch effectively comes before you get
to the actual punchline and (to me) does not distract from it.
--
Mark Brader "You can stop laughing now.
Toronto Well, maybe you *can't*, but you *may*."
m...@vex.net -- Rick Burger

My text in this article is in the public domain.

Chris

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Nov 9, 2010, 6:27:50 PM11/9/10
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Mark Brader <m...@vex.net> wrote in message
news:Rrudnd7_3ZPzMkTR...@vex.net...

> Chris:
>> From today's Daily Telegraph website readers comments.
>> http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/8118823/Large-cardinals-maths-shaken-by-the-unprovable.html
>
>> ...The squaw on the Hippopotamus was equal to the sum of the squaws
>> on the other two hides.
>
> When I heard that one 35-40 years ago, it was "The son of the squaw
> on the hippopotamus is equal to the son of the squaws on the other
> two hides". This matches the circumstances of the joke better
> (in this version she has one son who's as heavy as the other two
> put together), but the actual theorem less well. I still think it
> works better, since the mismatch effectively comes before you get
> to the actual punchline and (to me) does not distract from it.
>
There are many variations of that joke, however, that's not the "joke" I was
referring too.

--
"Should I compare thee to a summers day,
Or shove it up you straight away"

Martin Clunes

art...@yahoo.com

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Nov 9, 2010, 8:05:27 PM11/9/10
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On Nov 9, 11:36 am, "Chris" <ch...@chris.invalid> wrote:
> From today's Daily Telegraph website readers comments.http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/8118823/Large-cardinals-maths-shak...

>
> <rogerus>
> "Back in the days when north American Indians lived in teepees, there were
> three ladies who were pregnant, and they all gave birth on the same day. It
> was the custom to be on an animal skin when this occurred.
> The lady on the Elk skin had a son.
> The lady on the Deer skin had a daughter, and the one on the Hippopotamus
> skin gave birth to a son and daughter.
> This went to prove that:
> The squaw on the Hippopotamus was equal to the sum of the squaws on the
> other two hides."
>
> <soozee>
> "Were there hippopotamuses in North American then ?"
>
> Sheesh!

I think that hippothesis has been refuted

Mac

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Nov 9, 2010, 8:46:54 PM11/9/10
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It's not a hippothesis, so that's irelephant.

AN "Du côté de chez Flanders et Swann" McC

John Hatpin

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Nov 9, 2010, 11:03:14 PM11/9/10
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art...@yahoo.com wrote:

Are you being hippo-critical?
--
John Hatpin

Reunite Gondwanaland (Mary Shafer)

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Nov 10, 2010, 1:30:43 AM11/10/10
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On Tue, 9 Nov 2010 16:36:59 -0000, "Chris" <ch...@chris.invalid>
wrote:

No, not in either America (South America mostly has, and had, sloths,
camelids, and marsupials, being really hard up for mammals). There
were enough trade routes, however, that a hippopotamus skin could
possibly have made its way to the Plains, which is where the few
Indians that lived in teepees were, in the 1800s.

Mary "Never underestimate the power of trade."
--
Mary Shafer Retired aerospace research engineer
We didn't just do weird stuff at Dryden, we wrote reports about it.
reunite....@gmail.com or mil...@qnet.com
Visit my blog at http://thedigitalknitter.blogspot.com/

art...@yahoo.com

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Nov 10, 2010, 10:33:36 AM11/10/10
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On Nov 10, 1:30 am, "Reunite Gondwanaland (Mary Shafer)"
<reunite.gondw...@gmail.com> wrote:


> No, not in either America (South America mostly has, and had, sloths,
> camelids, and marsupials, being really hard up for mammals).  

Some guys will do anything for a little possy.....

Mark Steese

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Nov 11, 2010, 4:00:27 PM11/11/10
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"Reunite Gondwanaland (Mary Shafer)" <reunite....@gmail.com> wrote
in news:qfekd65sujtah3955...@4ax.com:

> On Tue, 9 Nov 2010 16:36:59 -0000, "Chris" <ch...@chris.invalid>
> wrote:
>
>> From today's Daily Telegraph website readers comments.
>> http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/8118823/Large-cardinals-maths-shake
>> n-by-the-unprovable.html
>>
>> <rogerus>
>> "Back in the days when north American Indians lived in teepees, there
>> were three ladies who were pregnant, and they all gave birth on the
>> same day. It was the custom to be on an animal skin when this
>> occurred. The lady on the Elk skin had a son.
>> The lady on the Deer skin had a daughter, and the one on the
>> Hippopotamus skin gave birth to a son and daughter.
>> This went to prove that:
>> The squaw on the Hippopotamus was equal to the sum of the squaws on
>> the other two hides."
>>
>> <soozee>
>> "Were there hippopotamuses in North American then ?"
>
> No, not in either America (South America mostly has, and had, sloths,
> camelids, and marsupials, being really hard up for mammals).

South America, hard up for mammals? Only if you limit the definition of
mammals to "really big herbivores." South America has so many different
kinds of monkeys that they're grouped into their own superfamily. And
then there are the capybaras, peccaries, agoutis, tapirs, chinchillas,
armadillos, guinea pigs, vampire bats, anteaters, etc., to say nothing
of the later arriving carnivorans, who diversified like crazy - South
America has more genera of canids than any other continent, and it does
pretty well by felids, too. South America also does quite well by cute
fuzzy carnivorans, with such critters as the coati and the kinkajou:

http://www.wildthingsinc.com/assets/images/Coati_002_sml.jpg

http://www.wildthingsinc.com/assets/images/Baby_Kinkajou_001_sml.jpg

And speaking of cute, South America is home to the world's smallest
monkey, the pygmy marmoset:

http://www.primates.com/marmosets/pygmy-marmoset.jpg

And the emperor tamarin, who was apparently designed by Dr. Seuss:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tamarin_portrait.JPG

And the vest-wearing, disco-dancing tamandua:

http://30.media.tumblr.com/2N30ZQNb9h49ehf6XdLIziBro1_400.jpg

There's even an insanely cute cervid, the pud�:

http://www.biolib.cz/en/image/id10425/

It's amazing that South America hasn't been acquired by Japan and turned
into a strategic kawaii reserve.
--
The "Kinkade Glow" could be seen as derived in spirit from the
"lustrous, pearly mist" that Mark Twain had deried in the Bierstadt
paintings, and, the level of execution to one side, there are certain
unsettling similarities between the two painters. -Joan Didion

John Hatpin

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Nov 11, 2010, 6:48:53 PM11/11/10
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Mark Steese wrote:

> South America, hard up for mammals? Only if you limit the definition of
> mammals to "really big herbivores." South America has so many different
> kinds of monkeys that they're grouped into their own superfamily. And
> then there are the capybaras, peccaries, agoutis, tapirs, chinchillas,
> armadillos, guinea pigs, vampire bats, anteaters, etc., to say nothing
> of the later arriving carnivorans, who diversified like crazy - South
> America has more genera of canids than any other continent, and it does
> pretty well by felids, too. South America also does quite well by cute
> fuzzy carnivorans, with such critters as the coati and the kinkajou:
>
> http://www.wildthingsinc.com/assets/images/Coati_002_sml.jpg
>
> http://www.wildthingsinc.com/assets/images/Baby_Kinkajou_001_sml.jpg
>
> And speaking of cute, South America is home to the world's smallest
> monkey, the pygmy marmoset:
>
> http://www.primates.com/marmosets/pygmy-marmoset.jpg
>
> And the emperor tamarin, who was apparently designed by Dr. Seuss:
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tamarin_portrait.JPG
>
> And the vest-wearing, disco-dancing tamandua:
>
> http://30.media.tumblr.com/2N30ZQNb9h49ehf6XdLIziBro1_400.jpg
>

> There's even an insanely cute cervid, the pudú:
>
> http://www.biolib.cz/en/image/id10425/

What a wonderful set of pictures. A wonderful set of strange cuddly
mammals, in fact.

> It's amazing that South America hasn't been acquired by Japan and turned
> into a strategic kawaii reserve.

Oh, and if anyone's wondering what a kawaii is, here's one:

http://www.sequencer.de/pix/kawai_teisco/kawai_100F.jpg
--
John Hatpin

Hactar

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Nov 11, 2010, 7:20:00 PM11/11/10
to
In article <m10pd6dr8a2v4ckra...@4ax.com>,

John Hatpin <RemoveThi...@gmailAndThisToo.com> wrote:
> Mark Steese wrote:
>
> > South America, hard up for mammals? Only if you limit the definition of
> > mammals to "really big herbivores." South America has so many different
> > kinds of monkeys that they're grouped into their own superfamily. And
> > then there are the capybaras, peccaries, agoutis, tapirs, chinchillas,
> > armadillos, guinea pigs, vampire bats, anteaters, etc., to say nothing
> > of the later arriving carnivorans, who diversified like crazy - South
> > America has more genera of canids than any other continent, and it does
> > pretty well by felids, too. South America also does quite well by cute
> > fuzzy carnivorans, with such critters as the coati and the kinkajou:
> >
> > http://www.wildthingsinc.com/assets/images/Coati_002_sml.jpg
> >
> > http://www.wildthingsinc.com/assets/images/Baby_Kinkajou_001_sml.jpg
> >
> > And speaking of cute, South America is home to the world's smallest
> > monkey, the pygmy marmoset:
> >
> > http://www.primates.com/marmosets/pygmy-marmoset.jpg
> >
> > And the emperor tamarin, who was apparently designed by Dr. Seuss:
> >
> > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tamarin_portrait.JPG
> >
> > And the vest-wearing, disco-dancing tamandua:
> >
> > http://30.media.tumblr.com/2N30ZQNb9h49ehf6XdLIziBro1_400.jpg
> >
> > There's even an insanely cute cervid, the pud�:

> >
> > http://www.biolib.cz/en/image/id10425/
>
> What a wonderful set of pictures. A wonderful set of strange cuddly
> mammals, in fact.
>
> > It's amazing that South America hasn't been acquired by Japan and turned
> > into a strategic kawaii reserve.
>
> Oh, and if anyone's wondering what a kawaii is, here's one:
>
> http://www.sequencer.de/pix/kawai_teisco/kawai_100F.jpg

There's another species in the same family which exhibits significant
differences:

http://www.carusopianos.com/components/com_virtuemart/shop_image/product/Kawai_Upright_Pi_4c372fee25415.jpg

http://preview.tinyurl.com/2eznx9b

--
-eben QebWe...@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81
A neutron walks into a bar; he asks the bartender,
"How much for a beer?" The bartender looks at him,
and says "For you, no charge." -- GooberMcFly on Fark

Opus the Penguin

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Nov 11, 2010, 8:23:59 PM11/11/10
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John Hatpin (RemoveThi...@gmailAndThisToo.com) wrote:

> Mark Steese wrote:
[snip]


>
> What a wonderful set of pictures. A wonderful set of strange
> cuddly mammals, in fact.
>
>> It's amazing that South America hasn't been acquired by Japan and
>> turned into a strategic kawaii reserve.
>
> Oh, and if anyone's wondering what a kawaii is, here's one:
>
> http://www.sequencer.de/pix/kawai_teisco/kawai_100F.jpg


That may be the oddest mammal I've ever seen.

--
Opus the Penguin
The best darn penguin in all of Usenet

Boron Elgar

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Nov 11, 2010, 9:02:53 PM11/11/10
to
On Fri, 12 Nov 2010 01:23:59 +0000 (UTC), Opus the Penguin
<opusthepen...@gmail.com> wrote:

>John Hatpin (RemoveThi...@gmailAndThisToo.com) wrote:
>
>> Mark Steese wrote:
>[snip]
>>
>> What a wonderful set of pictures. A wonderful set of strange
>> cuddly mammals, in fact.
>>
>>> It's amazing that South America hasn't been acquired by Japan and
>>> turned into a strategic kawaii reserve.
>>
>> Oh, and if anyone's wondering what a kawaii is, here's one:
>>
>> http://www.sequencer.de/pix/kawai_teisco/kawai_100F.jpg
>
>
>That may be the oddest mammal I've ever seen.

You never met my sister.

Hactar

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Nov 11, 2010, 9:11:00 PM11/11/10
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In article <Xns9E2DC536C771Bop...@127.0.0.1>,

Opus the Penguin <opusthepen...@gmail.com> wrote:
> John Hatpin (RemoveThi...@gmailAndThisToo.com) wrote:
>
> > Mark Steese wrote:
> [snip]
> >
> > What a wonderful set of pictures. A wonderful set of strange
> > cuddly mammals, in fact.
> >
> >> It's amazing that South America hasn't been acquired by Japan and
> >> turned into a strategic kawaii reserve.
> >
> > Oh, and if anyone's wondering what a kawaii is, here's one:
> >
> > http://www.sequencer.de/pix/kawai_teisco/kawai_100F.jpg
>
> That may be the oddest mammal I've ever seen.

What's that about a manual?

--
-eben QebWe...@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity,
and I'm not sure about the former." -- Albert Einstein

John Hatpin

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Nov 12, 2010, 12:12:55 AM11/12/10
to
Opus the Penguin wrote:

> John Hatpin (RemoveThi...@gmailAndThisToo.com) wrote:
>
> > Mark Steese wrote:
> [snip]
> >
> > What a wonderful set of pictures. A wonderful set of strange
> > cuddly mammals, in fact.
> >
> >> It's amazing that South America hasn't been acquired by Japan and
> >> turned into a strategic kawaii reserve.
> >
> > Oh, and if anyone's wondering what a kawaii is, here's one:
> >
> > http://www.sequencer.de/pix/kawai_teisco/kawai_100F.jpg
>
>
> That may be the oddest mammal I've ever seen.

Odder than a cat?

http://www.synthmuseum.com/octave/octcat01.jpg
--
John Hatpin

Boron Elgar

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Nov 12, 2010, 5:57:58 AM11/12/10
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On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 21:11:00 -0500, ebenZ...@verizon.net (Hactar)
wrote:

>In article <Xns9E2DC536C771Bop...@127.0.0.1>,
>Opus the Penguin <opusthepen...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> John Hatpin (RemoveThi...@gmailAndThisToo.com) wrote:
>>
>> > Mark Steese wrote:
>> [snip]
>> >
>> > What a wonderful set of pictures. A wonderful set of strange
>> > cuddly mammals, in fact.
>> >
>> >> It's amazing that South America hasn't been acquired by Japan and
>> >> turned into a strategic kawaii reserve.
>> >
>> > Oh, and if anyone's wondering what a kawaii is, here's one:
>> >
>> > http://www.sequencer.de/pix/kawai_teisco/kawai_100F.jpg
>>
>> That may be the oddest mammal I've ever seen.
>
>What's that about a manual?

Yeah, Rahm wants to be mayor of Chicago.

Boron

Hactar

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Nov 12, 2010, 8:27:45 PM11/12/10
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In article <85jpd61m6u047t101...@4ax.com>,

Or a Cat?

http://www.cat.com/

--
-eben QebWe...@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81

LIBRA: A big promotion is just around the corner for someone
much more talented than you. Laughter is the very best medicine,
remember that when your appendix bursts next week. -- Weird Al

Hieronymus Agricola

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Nov 12, 2010, 8:40:27 PM11/12/10
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On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 22:12:55 -0700, John Hatpin wrote
(in article <85jpd61m6u047t101...@4ax.com>):

SFW

http://tinyurl.com/262gxqp

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