Who are Mark Goodson & Bill Todman, and who appointed them king of game shows?

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Sam Posten III

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May 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/25/99
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Seems every gameshow is either a Mark Goodman & Bill Todman
production, except those on Comedy Central and those created by Merv
Griffith.

I've seen their names associated with 50's game shows, I think.

How far back do they go, and did they have a strangle hold on this
niche of TV, or was there really no attempt at competition against
them.

Sam

Rowan Mayfair

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May 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/25/99
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Sam Posten III wrote:

> Seems every gameshow is either a Mark Goodman & Bill Todman
> production, except those on Comedy Central and those created by Merv
> Griffith.

<nitpick>

His name is Merv Griffin [1].

</nitpick>

--
Tanja

1. Like the mythological beast.


--
"You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be
misquoted and used against you in a future post."

Bear

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May 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/25/99
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Sam Posten III wrote:
>
> Seems every gameshow is either a Mark Goodman & Bill Todman
> production, except those on Comedy Central and those created by Merv
> Griffith.
>
> I've seen their names associated with 50's game shows, I think.
>
> How far back do they go, and did they have a strangle hold on this
> niche of TV, or was there really no attempt at competition against
> them.

Seems like Bob Banner was another, similarly prolific producer, back
then, with Bob Banner Productions.

As for G&T, I suspect they're outta there, by now; but I did do a game
show a couple of years ago for Johnathan Goodson Productions.

As for the inbred nature of the biz, if I remember correctly, one of the
producers was a 30somthing Gary Dawson, who I think is from Richard
Dawson's line.

Jack Barry and Dan Enright were a couple of other noted game show
producers or the era (as well as Barry being a host). Think Quiz Show
Scandal of the '50s. They came back and did "Joker's Wild" and
"Tic-Tac-Dough". Second generationwise, I worked with Barry's son John,
on one of those.

--
Bear

HpstrDufuz

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May 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/25/99
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>rad...@bigfoot.commmmmmmm
>Date: 5/25/99 4:55 PM EST
>Message-id: <374d1c0f....@nntp.ix.netcom.com>
>
>On Tue, 25 May 1999 15:37:07 EDT, pos...@sesd.ilex.com (Sam Posten III)

>wrote:
>
>>Seems every gameshow is either a Mark Goodman & Bill Todman
>>production ... <snip> How far back do they go, and did they have
>>a strangle hold on this niche of TV, or was there really no
>>attempt at competition against them.
>
>
>This one is better left to the good folks at alt.tv.game-shows ...
>
>-- Geno

Actually, this is the most straight dope like question I've seen here in
months. I bet we won't see the phrase "free market" here even one time.

-Fast, pretty, and can't possibly be beat

Jim Ellwanger

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May 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/25/99
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In article <374B0E72...@my.box>, Bear <no....@my.box> wrote:

>Sam Posten III wrote:
>>
>> Seems every gameshow is either a Mark Goodman & Bill Todman

>> production, except those on Comedy Central and those created by Merv
>> Griffith.

To pick a time in which there were more game shows on TV than there are
now, and a TV Guide issue I happen to have handy, on the networks' daytime
lineup on September 23, 1974, there were 18 game shows, 5 of which were
Goodson-Todman productions. ("Now You See It," "Password," "The Price Is
Right," "Match Game '74," and "Tattletales.") At the time, they were also
doing at least two other shows for syndication. ("What's My Line?" and
"To Tell the Truth.")

They were very good and prolific at producing game shows, and always had a
bunch on the air, many of them long-running, well-known titles, as were
most of the above, until the decline of networks' daytime lineups in the
'90s.

But there were other long-running, well-known shows airing in 1974 that
weren't Goodson-Todman productions, most by producers that did pretty much
nothing but game shows. Among them:

* "Name That Tune," a Ralph Edwards production
* "The $10,000 Pyramid," a Bob Stewart production
* "Let's Make a Deal," a Stefan Hatos-Monty Hall production
* "The Joker's Wild," a Jack Barry-Dan Enright production
* "The Newlywed Game," a Chuck Barris production
* "Hollywood Squares," a Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley production

Speaking of which, in your description above, you forgot about the current
version of "Hollywood Squares," which is a John Moffitt-Pat Tourk Lee
production.

>> I've seen their names associated with 50's game shows, I think.
>>

>> How far back do they go, and did they have a strangle hold on this
>> niche of TV, or was there really no attempt at competition against
>> them.

Their first television game show was called "Winner Take All," which
premiered on July 1, 1948 and lasted a couple of years. Their first major
hit was "What's My Line," which premiered February 2, 1950, and lasted
until 1967 on network prime-time and then until 1975 in syndication.

Bill Todman died in the late '70s, and in the early '80s, Mark Goodson
bought out the Todman share from his heirs and took Todman's name out of
the company name.

Mark Goodson has also since died, and the company has ended up in the
hands of Pearson, an international TV production company that happens to
produce a lot of game shows worldwide. But they've kept Mark Goodson
Productions as a separate company, so on their two currently-running game
shows, Mark Goodson's name still gets invoked by the announcer at the end.

(Just so nobody asks, it's "The Price Is Right," and the syndicated "Match
Game." If you didn't know the latter one existed, it's because it's got
no promotion. Check your TV Guide's middle-of-the-night listings, and
hurry, before it gets put out of its low-rated misery.)

>Seems like Bob Banner was another, similarly prolific producer, back
>then, with Bob Banner Productions.

The only listing I can find for him in "The Encyclopedia of TV Game Shows"
is "Almost Anything Goes," a mid-'70s show.

>As for G&T, I suspect they're outta there, by now; but I did do a game
>show a couple of years ago for Johnathan Goodson Productions.

I mentioned the current Goodson-Todman situation above. Jonathan
Goodson's company is separate from Mark Goodson Productions, and is mainly
involved with game shows for state lotteries.

--
Jim Ellwanger <trai...@mindspring.com>
<http://trainman1.home.mindspring.com/> keeps picking up steam.
"Hats off to the New Age hairstyle made of bones."

HpstrDufuz

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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>>Seems like Bob Banner was another, similarly prolific producer, back
>>then, with Bob Banner Productions.

Yes, even if Stan Lee kept getting his name confused.

Bob? Bruce? David?

HpstrDufuz

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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>There were lots of other game show producers, but G/T were arguably the most
>successfull and longest-reigning.

Were G&T in the G&T program?

Rowan Mayfair

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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Jim Ellwanger wrote:

<snip>

> ...and the syndicated "Match


> Game." If you didn't know the latter one existed, it's because it's got
> no promotion. Check your TV Guide's middle-of-the-night listings, and
> hurry, before it gets put out of its low-rated misery.)

It's on during the day (12N) here in Detroit. It's too bad that it didn't get
any promotion, I liked the old Match Game, I like this version, and I adore
Michael Burger no matter what he does.

<snip>

--
Tanja

Lisa

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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On 26 May 1999 00:30:42 GMT, hpstr...@aol.compimpslap (HpstrDufuz)
wrote:

>>>Seems like Bob Banner was another, similarly prolific producer, back
>>>then, with Bob Banner Productions.
>
> Yes, even if Stan Lee kept getting his name confused.
>
> Bob? Bruce? David?

Stan made the mistake of calling him Bob in one issue (I think #3),
and covered it by naming him Robert Bruce Banner after it was pointed
out to him. David came about because the TV people thought Bruce had
"faggy" connotations to a lot of people, but even then, they kept it
as his middle name on the gravestone at the end of the pilot.

Lisa
--Bringing utterly useless trivia to the masses

David Samuel Barr

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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rad...@bigfoot.commmmmmmm wrote:
>
> >>On Tue, 25 May 1999 15:37:07 EDT, pos...@sesd.ilex.com (Sam Posten
> >>III) wrote:
> >>
> >>>Seems every gameshow is either a Mark Goodman & Bill Todman
> >>>production ... <snip> How far back do they go, and did they have

> >>>a strangle hold on this niche of TV, or was there really no
> >>>attempt at competition against them.
>
> There were lots of other game show producers, but G/T were arguably
> the most successful and longest-reigning.

Yep....and my dad was their tax attorney in the 60s and 70s (really).

rob...@bestweb.net

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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On 1999-05-25 row...@innocent.com said:

>Sam Posten III wrote:

>> Seems every gameshow is either a Mark Goodman & Bill Todman

>> production, except those on Comedy Central and those created by
>>Merv Griffith.

><nitpick>


>His name is Merv Griffin [1].
></nitpick>
>--
>Tanja
>1. Like the mythological beast.
>--

Right. SCTV had a "Merv Griffith Show". One of their kooky hybrids, it was
exactly as it sounds -- a cross between the Merv Griffin and Andy Griffith
shows.

Robert
Net-Tamer V 1.11 - Registered

rob...@bestweb.net

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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Speaking of Barry-Enright (who were brought up on this thread), I myself
took part in a rigged quiz show in the early 1960s. It was "Know Your
City", written, produced, and performed exclusively at Public School 108
here in the Bronx. I was mystery guest Peter Minuet and a singer in the
chorus. I don't know how many in the audience (assembly) were fooled into
thinking it was for real. One "contestant" forgot his line and ad-libbed a
wrong answer.

Shawn Wilson

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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HpstrDufuz <hpstr...@aol.compimpslap> wrote in message
news:19990525181026...@ng-ca1.aol.com...

> Actually, this is the most straight dope like question I've seen here in
> months. I bet we won't see the phrase "free market" here even one time.


Well, in a free market, producers of a product who have an advantage over
other producers of that product will tend to increasingly dominate said
market.

(heh, heh, heh)

Steve Kleene

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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Bear <no....@my.box> wrote:
>> Seems like Bob Banner was another, similarly prolific producer, back
>> then, with Bob Banner Productions.

From: trai...@mindspring.com (Jim Ellwanger) replied:
> The only listing I can find for him in "The Encyclopedia of TV Game Shows"
> is "Almost Anything Goes," a mid-'70s show.

But of course there was "Solid Gold" (not a game show).
bobbanner.com/banner.htm also lists "Candid Camera", "The Carol Burnett
Show", "Star Search", and "It's Showtime at the Apollo".

Here's an idea. "Happy Days", "The Brady Bunch", and "Leave It to Beaver"
had reunion shows. Let's get the geriatric Solid Gold dancers together again
and watch them stumble around the stage. To draw a younger audience, they
could dance to modern hits. I nominate "Flagpole Sitta" by Harvey Danger.

I'm not sick, but I'm not well.


rob...@bestweb.net

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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On 1999-05-26 row...@innocent.com (Tanja) said:

>It's on during the day (12N) here in Detroit. It's too bad that it
>didn't get any promotion, I liked the old Match Game,

You mean the original version? It had only two celebrity contestants at a
time, each teamed with two regular-folks contestants. Most of the questions
were in the form, "Name something that...."; only a few were in the form,
"Fill in this blank with one or more words." Emphasis was NOT on cheap
laughs; the humor was far less strained. The contest between the teams was
fairer too, in that both teams got the same question at the same time. The
theme music was the Baby Elephant Walk.

mlo...@lobo.civetsystems.com

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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Rowan Mayfair <row...@innocent.com> writes:

> Sam Posten III wrote:
>
> > Seems every gameshow is either a Mark Goodman & Bill Todman
> > production, except those on Comedy Central and those created by Merv
> > Griffith.
>
> <nitpick>
>
> His name is Merv Griffin [1].
>
> </nitpick>

That's not really a nitpick, given that the gryphon is on the logo of
his production company.

ObPersonalStory - I had a neighbor named Griffin. I came home one day
to find my wife very agitated. She didn't speak English well (at all,
actually), but had looked up the name on the mailbox in her
dictionary. She wanted to know what I thought we should do about the
monster next door.

M.


Rowan Mayfair

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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rob...@bestweb.net wrote:

That doesn't sound familiar. I was thinking of the version(s) with Gene Rayburn
(?sp) as the host, with six celebrity panelists (Brett Somers [?sp], Charles
Nelson Reilly, and Richard Dawson were all regulars for years) and two
'regular-folk' contestants.

The reason I say 'version(s)' is because for a while it seemed to change each
year, i.e. Match Game '73, then Match Game '74, etc. I am too young to remember
those, but I do remember watching Match Game PM with my grandma during dinner.

HpstrDufuz

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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>From: mlo...@lobo.civetsystems.com

>ObPersonalStory - I had a neighbor named Griffin. I came home one day
>to find my wife very agitated.

I like this story so far.

> She didn't speak English well (at all,
>actually)

Ah, a missing piece of the puzzle.

>but had looked up the name on the mailbox in her
>dictionary. She wanted to know what I thought we should do about the
>monster next door.

yes, I am sure she thought there was a griffin next door, especially one who
recieved mail.


Dear Griffin;

So sorry to read about your recent losses; I thought you had a man come round
to spray for heroes. How did that thing with that Carroll fellow work out?

Yours in monsterhood,
Chimera.
>
>M.
>
>
>

Por Dios Y Espana

HpstrDufuz

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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> "Shawn Wilson" <shawn....@worldnet.att.net>
>Date: 5/26/99 9:11 AM EST
>Message-id: <7igvd9$esa$1...@bgtnsc03.worldnet.att.net>

>
>
>HpstrDufuz <hpstr...@aol.compimpslap> wrote in message
>news:19990525181026...@ng-ca1.aol.com...
>
>> Actually, this is the most straight dope like question I've seen here in
>> months. I bet we won't see the phrase "free market" here even one time.
>
>
>Well, in a free market,

Let's replace the phrase "free market" with the phrase "flea market" and set
trip on AFU.

> producers of a product who have an advantage over
>other producers of that product will tend to increasingly dominate said
>market.
>
>(heh, heh, heh)
>

Ah, but TV is not a free market, due to government regulation and licensing.

Por Dios Y Espana

Jim Ellwanger

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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In article <374C5A14...@innocent.com>, Rowan Mayfair
<row...@innocent.com> wrote:

>rob...@bestweb.net wrote:
>
>> On 1999-05-26 row...@innocent.com (Tanja) said:
>>
>> >It's on during the day (12N) here in Detroit. It's too bad that it
>> >didn't get any promotion, I liked the old Match Game,
>>
>> You mean the original version? It had only two celebrity contestants at a
>> time, each teamed with two regular-folks contestants. Most of the questions
>> were in the form, "Name something that...."; only a few were in the form,
>> "Fill in this blank with one or more words." Emphasis was NOT on cheap
>> laughs; the humor was far less strained. The contest between the teams was
>> fairer too, in that both teams got the same question at the same time. The
>> theme music was the Baby Elephant Walk.
>
>That doesn't sound familiar. I was thinking of the version(s) with Gene
Rayburn
>(?sp) as the host, with six celebrity panelists (Brett Somers [?sp], Charles
>Nelson Reilly, and Richard Dawson were all regulars for years) and two
>'regular-folk' contestants.

The original, "The Match Game," ran from 1962 to 1969 on NBC in daytime
and was also hosted by Gene Rayburn. Unfortunately, as far as anybody
knows, only three of the episodes are still in existence, and one of them
is the pilot. I've seen the two "regular" episodes, which show up on Game
Show Network occasionally.

>The reason I say 'version(s)' is because for a while it seemed to change each
>year, i.e. Match Game '73, then Match Game '74, etc. I am too young to
remember
>those, but I do remember watching Match Game PM with my grandma during dinner.

The CBS daytime version started as "Match Game '73" (to distinguish it
from the old one) changed the name every year. (They had a New Year's
celebration every year on the show, where they'd lower the new sign from
the rafters.)

"Match Game PM," meanwhile, was a once-a-week syndicated version that
started in 1975. After CBS cancelled "Match Game '79," it went into daily
syndication and was renamed "Match Game." They made new episodes until
1982, although some local stations ran reruns into the mid-'80s.

Meanwhile, Goodson licensed "Hollywood Squares" from Heatter-Quigley for
the "Match Game/Hollywood Squares Hour," which ran on NBC in the 1983-84
season. The main problem with the show was that, unlike all other
versions of "Hollywood Squares," the celebrities weren't given any
information beforehand to help them come up with jokes.

"Match Game" next showed up on ABC's daytime schedule for the 1990-91
season. This was the first version without Gene Rayburn (comedian Ross
Shafer was the host). The story is that Gene Rayburn was about to be
signed until "Entertainment Tonight" announced his birthday, and Mark
Goodson Productions decided he was too old.

And then there's the aforementioned 1998-99 syndicated version.

Given the repetitive nature of history, especially television history, I
predict that the next version will be "The Match Game/(something) Hour,"
premiering in the fall of 2005. Look for it!

By the way, the also aforementioned Game Show Network shows reruns of
"Match Game '74" and "Match Game PM" daily. Something else to complain to
your cable company about not getting.

--
Jim Ellwanger <trai...@mindspring.com>
You like <http://trainman1.home.mindspring.com/>, it likes you.
"Fifteen cars, and fifteen restless riders..."

rob...@bestweb.net

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May 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/27/99
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On 1999-05-26 trai...@mindspring.com(JimEllwanger) said:

>The original, "The Match Game," ran from 1962 to 1969 on NBC in
>daytime and was also hosted by Gene Rayburn. Unfortunately, as far
>as anybody knows, only three of the episodes are still in existence,
>and one of them is the pilot. I've seen the two "regular" episodes,
>which show up on Game Show Network occasionally.

One interesting thing they sometimes did, probably at the discretion of some
guy in a booth, was to immediately repeat a question if it produced no score
the first time, and if audience reaction didn't give away a clear "right"
answer. It was interesting to see decisions made by contestants to either
switch or keep their original answers, and so funny to see them sometimes
apparently screw themselves as a result.
Over the years you could detect the progression that everntually led to
the changed format in the revived show. "Fill in this blank" questions came
to almost entirely displace the "name something/someone" questions, and
risque connotations started to come in, too. Or maybe as a kid growing up,
I just recognized them more. And Gene Rayburn would occasionally peek at
answers and chortle -- often just to spook the contestants, as a bluff!
Now, who can remember who some substitute emcees were when Gene Rayburn
was out sick or something? I can't, but I'm guessing there were some! And
how much is the home version of the game worth these days? And who but a
collector (or a contestant on the TV show) would've gotten such a package,
when the game requires no more than writing tools? OK, maybe a set of
questions if nobody neutral could be found to provide them.

David Samuel Barr

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May 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/27/99
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HpstrDufuz wrote:
>
> >>Seems like Bob Banner was another, similarly prolific producer, back
> >>then, with Bob Banner Productions.
>
> Yes, even if Stan Lee kept getting his name confused.
>
> Bob? Bruce? David?

"That's going to be a mite confusing. Mind if we call you 'Bruce' to
keep it clear?"

Dennis Matheson

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May 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/27/99
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rob...@bestweb.net wrote in message ...
>>snip<<

> Now, who can remember who some substitute emcees were when Gene Rayburn
>was out sick or something? I can't, but I'm guessing there were some! And
>how much is the home version of the game worth these days? And who but a
>collector (or a contestant on the TV show) would've gotten such a package,
>when the game requires no more than writing tools? OK, maybe a set of
>questions if nobody neutral could be found to provide them.
>

Well, right at this moment on eBay the home version seems to be around
$20.
http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=105668242

And I don't know how 1974 is the first version when this one is 1968.
http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=109351475

--
".sig file missing - (A)dlib, (R)etry, (F)ail?"

Dennis Matheson --- tans...@earthlink.net
Hike, Dive, Ski, Climb --- http://home.earthlink.net/~tanstaafl


Sam Posten III

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May 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/27/99
to

Howls of derisive laughter! Australia Australia Australia! We Love
You! Amen. Crack Two!

Sam

Sam Posten III

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May 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/27/99
to
>They were very good and prolific at producing game shows, and always had a
>bunch on the air, many of them long-running, well-known titles, as were
>most of the above, until the decline of networks' daytime lineups in the
>'90s.

Thanks for the background.

>>As for G&T, I suspect they're outta there, by now; but I did do a game
>>show a couple of years ago for Johnathan Goodson Productions.
>
>I mentioned the current Goodson-Todman situation above. Jonathan
>Goodson's company is separate from Mark Goodson Productions, and is mainly
>involved with game shows for state lotteries.

I suspect that Game Show Network has sparked a bit of GS Nostalgia in
a lot of us, and I for one would like to see a lot more new 90's game
shows come about. Ben Stein and Inquizition fit the bill perfectly
but we need more.

Have you seen the new KIDS game shows on GSN? Like Jep, Click, and
Wheel 2000? All computer Generated gizmos and such. I'd like to see
some mature shows take on this trend.

Someone wrote a while ago about some Japanese shows, like 'Don't go
for it electric boy', I'd like to see some of them, it sounds like
they REALLY demean the contestants.

Sam

HpstrDufuz

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May 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/27/99
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>David Samuel Barr wrote:

>HpstrDufuz wrote:
>>
>> >>Seems like Bob Banner was another, similarly prolific producer, back
>> >>then, with Bob Banner Productions.
>>
>> Yes, even if Stan Lee kept getting his name confused.
>>
>> Bob? Bruce? David?
>
>"That's going to be a mite confusing. Mind if we call you 'Bruce' to
>keep it clear?"
>

"They Call Me Bruce!"

Por Dios Y Espana

rob...@bestweb.net

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May 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/28/99
to
As long as we're on the subject, how about the short-lived ripoff of To Tell
the Truth, One in a Million? I remember it for one episode, probably while
I was home from school with a cold. That was when Helen Klaben was the
guest, 3 years after her episode in the Yukon with Ralph Flores. Unlike To
Tell the Truth, One in a Million actually gave the real first names of the
guest and the impostors, and gave successive clues to their identity.
Apparently Ms. Klaben's fame was so fleeting that just 3 years later, with
her first name given, the contestant couldn't pick her out from the two
impostors. Well, I knew who the real one was, because I'd read her book --
the kiddie version, at least.
That was also the irony in the TV movie version a few years ago of Hey,
I'm Alive! (Sally Struthers and What's-His-Name), when at the conclusion a
reporter asked Klaben what she was going to do now, and she said something
to the effect that she intended to live off her fame by telling her story,
followed by a an on-screen crawl explaining how quickly she lapsed into
obscurity. Also interesting about that movie was the difference between it
and Klaben's book. The movie used her title, but took Flores's version of
the story. My guess is that Klaben, Jewish atheist, told the story
straighter, while Flores, evangelical Christian, made it more of a religious
experience. The movie had her accede to his demand to call him Father, but
the book explained that she called him Daddy-O instead. The movie made a
big deal of the mysterious sound they heard, but the book at least implied
that it simply came from a distant saw mill and was a curiosity, not a
heavenly envoy.
For TV game shows that really made the most of the medium, it was hard to
beat Camouflage. It was a find-the-hidden-picture game. Try THAT on radio,
Stan Freberg!

StarChaser <Anti spam feature in address.>

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May 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/28/99
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On Thu, 27 May 1999 14:36:21 EDT, pos...@sesd.ilex.com (Sam Posten
III) wrote:

>On Thu, 27 May 1999 01:22:11 -0400, David Samuel Barr
><dsb...@mindspring.com> wrote:
>

>>> Bob? Bruce? David?
>>
>>"That's going to be a mite confusing. Mind if we call you 'Bruce' to
>>keep it clear?"
>

>Howls of derisive laughter! Australia Australia Australia! We Love
>You! Amen. Crack Two!

This 'ere's the wattle, the emblem of our land, you can stick it in a
bottle, you can 'old it in yer hand.
--

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Shawn Wilson

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May 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/28/99
to

<rob...@bestweb.net> wrote in message
news:3Hm33.1786$fB1.1...@newshog.newsread.com...

> For TV game shows that really made the most of the medium, it was hard
to
> beat Camouflage. It was a find-the-hidden-picture game. Try THAT on
radio,
> Stan Freberg!


I can't help thinking of the immensly popular radio *ventriloquist* of times
gone by at this point.

Steve Kleene

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May 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/28/99
to
rob...@bestweb.net asked:

> Now, who can remember who some substitute emcees were when Gene Rayburn
was out sick or something? I can't, but I'm guessing there were some!

I don't remember either. But if I had to guess at gunpoint to save my life
(not a game show), I'd guess "Jack Narz". He was for quite a few years the
generic substitute host and was also the brother of host Tom Kennedy (real
name Jim Narz). Art James would be my #2 guess, and Bill Cullen #3. And
here's a search that fails on AltaVista:

"art james" and "pay cards"

One of the more obscure shows, I guess. It was filmed in Vancouver and
syndicated to some UHF station in Detroit. The game was something like
poker, as I recall. Motto: "You don't have to know how to play cards to play
`Pay Cards`."

> For TV game shows that really made the most of the medium, it was hard to
> beat Camouflage.

Agreed.


Jon-o Addleman

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May 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/29/99
to
Once upon a Thu, 27 May 1999 14:41:04 EDT, pos...@sesd.ilex.com (Sam

Posten III) wrote:
>I suspect that Game Show Network has sparked a bit of GS Nostalgia in
>a lot of us, and I for one would like to see a lot more new 90's game
>shows come about. Ben Stein and Inquizition fit the bill perfectly
>but we need more.
>
>Have you seen the new KIDS game shows on GSN? Like Jep, Click, and
>Wheel 2000? All computer Generated gizmos and such. I'd like to see
>some mature shows take on this trend.
>
>Someone wrote a while ago about some Japanese shows, like 'Don't go
>for it electric boy', I'd like to see some of them, it sounds like
>they REALLY demean the contestants.

I think we all need a good dose of "Feelyat". No really!
--

Jon-o Addleman

Alan Hamilton

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May 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/30/99
to
On Thu, 27 May 1999 14:41:04 EDT, pos...@sesd.ilex.com (Sam Posten
III) wrote:

>All computer Generated gizmos and such. I'd like to see
>some mature shows take on this trend.

Which reminds me. "Wheel of Fortune" now has an electronic letter
board, making Vanna's job even more pointless that it was before.
--
/
/ * / Alan Hamilton
* * al...@primenet.com

Shawn Wilson

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May 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/30/99
to

Alan Hamilton <al...@primenet.com> wrote in message
news:3751c23b...@news.primenet.com...

> On Thu, 27 May 1999 14:41:04 EDT, pos...@sesd.ilex.com (Sam Posten
> III) wrote:
>
> >All computer Generated gizmos and such. I'd like to see
> >some mature shows take on this trend.
>
> Which reminds me. "Wheel of Fortune" now has an electronic letter
> board, making Vanna's job even more pointless that it was before.


Her job is to be a pretty girl, no piece of electronics can replace her, and
she will never be pointless either.

Bermuda999

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May 31, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/31/99
to
s...@syrano.acb.uc.edu (Steve Kleene) writes:
>
> And
>here's a search that fails on AltaVista:
>
> "art james" and "pay cards"
>
>One of the more obscure shows, I guess.

Try it again. Using those two phrases, AltaVista just provided 21 responses,
including "Canadian game shows" sites and at least one page devoted solely to
Pay Cards (http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Hills/3221/spc.html).

Bill Kinkaid

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Jun 5, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/5/99
to
On Sun, 30 May 1999 06:00:08 -0500,"Shawn Wilson"
<shawn....@worldnet.att.net> took it upon her/himself to inform us, for
one reason or another, that:

>> Which reminds me. "Wheel of Fortune" now has an electronic letter
>> board, making Vanna's job even more pointless that it was before.
>
>
>Her job is to be a pretty girl, no piece of electronics can replace her, and
>she will never be pointless either.
>

Wasn't she much more interesting before she started speaking?


Bob Patrick

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Sep 8, 2023, 5:11:17 PMSep 8
to
The theme song of the original "Match Game" was "Swingin' Safari" by Bert Kaempfert.

Michael Trew

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Sep 8, 2023, 10:37:05 PMSep 8
to
Upon hearing Goodson and Todman, the first thought that pops into my
head is "What's My Line" (original CBS version from the early 50's -
1967). Recently, I did watch a few old episodes of "To Tell The Truth".
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