The Double Dip Cone: Not a Cultural Universal?

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Matt Miller

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Jul 19, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/19/99
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In article <379407...@cyburban.com>, pau...@cyburban.com says...
> Grand Central Terminal, NYC, has a newly installed ice cream stand
> called Custard Beach. I've been there twice. Each time I ordered the
> same thing (ok, so I'm boring):
>
> "Double dip cone please, one scoop vanilla, one chocolate."
>
> Each time it took 20 or 30 seconds to explain to the server that:
> 1) I wanted my ice cream in a cone, not a cup;
> 2) I only wanted *one* cone, not two;
> 3) it *is* possible to make a double dip in a conventional cone,
> without using the special wafer cone that has 2 cups side by side.
>
> My niggling little request so rattled the server today that even though
> I asked for chocolate on the bottom, I got it on top.
>
> Possible variables which may or may not affect this situation:
>
> 1) My servers were apparently native NYers whose first language was
> English. I should point out that whenever you engage in a business
> transaction in NY, there is a good chance that you and the tradesperson
> you are dealing with are not native speakers of the same language, and
> that it's traditional for native English speakers to bitch about how
> nonnative speakers "always" get things wrong. The language barrier
> wasn't the problem here. However...
>
> 2) It was fairly busy both times, and it's hard to hear in there anyway
> with all that marble. Nevertheless I am tempted to consider that...
>
> 3) There may be regional differences in the makeup and/or relative
> popularity of double dip cones that I'm unaware of. I myself am not a
> native NYer, rather a transplant from the midwest. However...
>
> 4) I've asked for double dip cones at local Haäaägen-Daäaäzssz (sp?)
> outlets without incident.
>
> 5) The management may just possibly be hiring stupid people in an effort
> to save on payroll.
>
> 6) The management may just be treating its employees like idiots, thus
> making them unwilling to do anything but follow orders from the boss,
> lest they be presented with the keys to the street.
>
> 7) The management may be treating its customers like idiots. I point out
> the absence of a double dip option on the cone menu as possible evidence
> thereof. (You *can*, however, get small, medium, or large, although how
> the sizes work vis-à-vis cones/cups is not explained.)
>
> 8) Then again, the management may themselves be idiots. (I refuse even
> to consider the possibility that *I* am the idiot here, so don't waste
> your time telling me.)
>
> Any experiences in or observations on the NYC area ice cream scene,
> especially as regards double dip cones, would be deeply appreciated.
> Thanks.

I don't know about NYC, but I imagine the phrase "double dip"
would get a blank stare in CA. Just like the one I'm giving the screen
right now.
I take it it means "two scoops".

--
Matt Miller | http://pw2.netcom.com/~matmillr | a.a# 357
EAC Spokesmodel
"Under the rocks and stones
there is water underground."
-The Talking Heads

Steven S. Scheer

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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I think "double dip" may be an out-of-favor term. I know what it meant, but
I would ask for "two scoops of....". Part of the reason may relate to the
fact the ice cream is now about $2 a scoop (for a premium brand like
Hagen-Daaz (is that spelled correctly?) and that so many places have
soft-serve (which is really ice milk, not ice cream), for which you order
either a large or small. Can't recall hearing "double dip" since...well
can't recall at all.

-SSS

Matt Miller <matmillrr...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.11fdaeb5f...@nntp.ix.netcom.com...

Dennis Matheson

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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Matt Miller wrote in message ...
>>snip<<

> I don't know about NYC, but I imagine the phrase "double dip"
>would get a blank stare in CA. Just like the one I'm giving the screen
>right now.
> I take it it means "two scoops".


I assume it is from context but I have always heard "double dip" as
referring to dipping your chip in the salsa, taking a bite, then dipping the
same chip a second time.

--
"You can't run away forever; but there's nothing wrong with getting a good
head start." --- Jim Steinman

Dennis Matheson --- den...@mountaindiver.com
Hike, Dive, Ski, Climb --- http://www.mountaindiver.com


The Avocado Avenger

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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"Dennis Matheson" <tans...@earthlink.net> writes:
>Matt Miller wrote in message ...

>>>snip<<
>> I don't know about NYC, but I imagine the phrase "double dip"
>>would get a blank stare in CA. Just like the one I'm giving the screen
>>right now.
>> I take it it means "two scoops".

> I assume it is from context but I have always heard "double dip" as
>referring to dipping your chip in the salsa, taking a bite, then dipping the
>same chip a second time.

I had *never* heard that phrase until some particularly stupid episode
of "Seinfeld". "Two scoops" has always brought to mind an image of Raisin
Bran, and I've never heard it used as a common phrase with ice cream.
It's always been "double dip", and, if my memory isn't too faulty, it even
states it that way on menus at Dairy Queen and yoghurt shops. Next time I
go to Baskin Robbins (not likely soon, but I'll try) I'll check it out.


Stacia * The Avocado Avenger * Life is a tale told by an idiot;
http://www.io.com/~stacia/ * Full of sound and fury,
Remove the guacamole to reply! * Signifying nothing.

Rich Clancey

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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Dennis Matheson (tans...@earthlink.net) wrote:
+ Matt Miller wrote in message ...
+ >>snip<<
+ > I don't know about NYC, but I imagine the phrase "double dip"
+ >would get a blank stare in CA. Just like the one I'm giving the screen
+ >right now.
+ > I take it it means "two scoops".
+ I assume it is from context but I have always heard "double dip" as
+ referring to dipping your chip in the salsa, taking a bite, then dipping the
+ same chip a second time.

Around Boston "double-dipping" refers to public sector workers
collecting an early retirement pension from one agency and a paycheck
from another. Or else it means welfare cheats.

It's odd that the ice cream term isn't that common, since ice
cream is practiced as a religion around these heah pahts.

Paul Lindemeyer

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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Matt Miller wrote:

> I don't know about NYC, but I imagine the phrase "double dip"

> would get a blank stare in CA. Just like the one I'm giving the screen

> right now.


> I take it it means "two scoops".

You take it correctly.

Similarly, Dennis Matheson wrote:

> I think "double dip" may be an out-of-favor term. I know what it meant, but
I would ask for "two scoops of....". Part of the reason may relate to
the

fact the ice cream is now about $2 a scoop for a premium brand like


Hagen-Daaz (is that spelled correctly?) and that so many places have
soft-serve (which is really ice milk, not ice cream), for which you
order
either a large or small. Can't recall hearing "double dip" since...well
can't recall at all.

"Double dip" may be an anachronism (then again, compared to NY and CA
the entire midwest is an anachronism). But "two scoops?" Why order
Raisin Bran when what you really want is ice cream?

I don't think the terminology was the problem so much as the *concept*
of two scoops in one cone. Dennis, I think you're onto something with
the soft serve idea.

Custard Beach bills itself as a frozen custard place. Usually FC is an
unscoopable soft product available only in vanilla and chocolate. Their
FC, however, is a semi-soft but still hand-scooped product whose
consistency is best described by the old Navy saying, "Man the shovels,
boys, it's too thick to pump." It too is available only in vanilla and
chocolate.

My error then may be thinking, "Scoops! Aha! I should ask for a double
dip!" -- not realizing that except for said scoops, the place thinks of
itself as a soft-serve place, where a double dip is, theoretically,
impossible.

OK, I'll shut up now.

--

Paul Lindemeyer <pau...@cyburban.com>
CELEBRATING THE SAXOPHONE: The Book
100 YEARS FROM TODAY: The Record
C.G. CONN Saxophones "Choice of the Artist"

rob...@bestweb.net

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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On 1999-07-19 matmillrr...@ix.netcom.com(MattMiller) said:

>I don't know about NYC, but I imagine the phrase "double dip"
>would get a blank stare in CA. Just like the one I'm giving the
>screen right now.
>I take it it means "two scoops".

>--
I agree, and I'm from NYC. "Dip" clouds the issue; "scoop" is unambiguous.

Robert
Net-Tamer V 1.11 - Registered

Briar Rose

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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Matt Miller <matmillrr...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
>I don't know about NYC, but I imagine the phrase "double dip"
>would get a blank stare in CA. Just like the one I'm giving the screen
>right now.
>I take it it means "two scoops".

Ditto. I heard it around New Jersey when I was very small, but
not after I moved out here to Sunny California, except in books
and suchlike. I always assumed it meant an ice cream cone dipped
in chocolate (a la Dairy Queen), but twice.

It's clear from context what you meant, but if I were working in
a non-chocolate-dipping ice cream joint and you asked for this,
I'd probably make pains to explain that we didn't dip our cones.

:) Connie-Lynne
--
Andi, George, and Andrew:
NEENER NEENER NEENER! This .sig is not an Onion quote!


JoAnne Schmitz

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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On Tue, 20 Jul 1999 06:14:31 -0500, "Steven S. Scheer"
<sssc...@webmail.bellsouth.net> wrote:

>I think "double dip" may be an out-of-favor term. I know what it meant, but
>I would ask for "two scoops of....". Part of the reason may relate to the

>fact the ice cream is now about $2 a scoop (for a premium brand like


>Hagen-Daaz (is that spelled correctly?) and that so many places have
>soft-serve (which is really ice milk, not ice cream)

Dumser's Dairyland in Ocean City Maryland has soft ice cream, not soft ice milk.
You can't call it ice cream if it's ice milk. And you can't call that stuff ice
milk. You could call it heaven.

>, for which you order
>either a large or small. Can't recall hearing "double dip" since...well

>can't recall at all.

It's used quite a lot here in Maryland, but there are some places that now sell
small, medium and large instead of single, double and triple scoops like Baskin
Robbins.

-JoAnne

Big David

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Jul 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/21/99
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Dumser's....<Homer Simpson voice> Dumser's Good

I can't eat the stuff any more, but I remember it well.

Big David (who got that way partially from too many trips to Dumser's)
"Commit a little mortal sin. It's good for your soul."
To reply, remove spambait

JoAnne Schmitz <jsch...@qis.net> wrote in message
news:37adb6b2....@news.digex.net...
<snip>

> Dumser's Dairyland in Ocean City Maryland has soft ice cream, not soft ice
milk.

<snip>

Margaret Kane Schoen

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Jul 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/21/99
to

Briar Rose wrote:

> Matt Miller <matmillrr...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
> >I don't know about NYC, but I imagine the phrase "double dip"
> >would get a blank stare in CA. Just like the one I'm giving the screen
> >right now.
> >I take it it means "two scoops".
>
> Ditto. I heard it around New Jersey when I was very small, but
> not after I moved out here to Sunny California, except in books
> and suchlike. I always assumed it meant an ice cream cone dipped
> in chocolate (a la Dairy Queen), but twice.
>
> It's clear from context what you meant, but if I were working in

> a non-chocolate-dipping ice cream joint and you asked for this,


> I'd probably make pains to explain that we didn't dip our cones.
>
> :) Connie-Lynne
> --
> Andi, George, and Andrew:

I'll ad my two cents as a veteran Carvel worker from New Jersey. I can't
recall ever hearing the phrase double dip referring to two scoops. Double
scoop yes. A dip (to me) means the Dairy Queen thing mentioned above.

Maybe it's an older term? I know when I worked at Carvel I would get people
coming in asking for things like a Brown Cow and whatnot, and I would just
stare at them blankly, given that this was conversation was taking place in
1982, not 1952.

Margaret

(and yes I made Fudgy the Whale)


minmei

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Jul 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/21/99
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In RI its called 'two scoops' too, though I've not investigated it much, I'm
a soft-serve freak myself: Large wafer cone, chocolate soft-serve, and
chocolate magic shell on the top.
minmei

Matt Miller <matmillrr...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.11fdaeb5f...@nntp.ix.netcom.com...

> In article <379407...@cyburban.com>, pau...@cyburban.com says...
> > Grand Central Terminal, NYC, has a newly installed ice cream stand
> > called Custard Beach. I've been there twice. Each time I ordered the
> > same thing (ok, so I'm boring):
> >
> > "Double dip cone please, one scoop vanilla, one chocolate."
> >
>

m w grossmann

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Jul 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/21/99
to
Steven S. Scheer wrote:
>
> I think "double dip" may be an out-of-favor term. I know what it meant, but
> I would ask for "two scoops of....". Part of the reason may relate to the
> fact the ice cream is now about $2 a scoop (for a premium brand like
> Hagen-Daaz (is that spelled correctly?) and that so many places have
> soft-serve (which is really ice milk, not ice cream), for which you order

> either a large or small. Can't recall hearing "double dip" since...well
> can't recall at all.

Ice Milk vs. Ice Cream is completely dependent on fat content. That's
it. McDonald's used to call their Soft-Serve cones "Soft Serve cones"
(or just "cone [or sundae]) for years and nailed employees who said "ice
cream" until they changed to a higher-fat mix which could be labelled
"ice cream".

Sorry I forget the cut-off percentage of fat.

And I've heard "double-dip" for years. Maybe it's something east of the
Mississippi, but the phrase "double-dipping" is used often for putting
two of X and placing it on one of Y. Like college credits. I was not
allowed to count a particular history course for both te core curriculum
and te German department requirements. To do so was "double-dipping" and
not allowed.

Cheers-

m w "we ain't talkin' about two scoops of raisins" grossmann

Matt Miller

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Jul 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/21/99
to
In article <7n583m$4...@news1.snet.net>, dp...@snet.net.nospam says...

> In RI its called 'two scoops' too, though I've not investigated it much, I'm
> a soft-serve freak myself: Large wafer cone, chocolate soft-serve, and
> chocolate magic shell on the top.
> minmei

Actually I walked passed an ice-cream place today and made sure to
look in the window and check out the menu, sure enough they listed single
and double dips.

Bear

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Jul 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/21/99
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Matt Miller wrote:
>
> In article <7n583m$4...@news1.snet.net>, dp...@snet.net.nospam says...
> > In RI its called 'two scoops' too, though I've not investigated it much, I'm
> > a soft-serve freak myself: Large wafer cone, chocolate soft-serve, and
> > chocolate magic shell on the top.
> > minmei
>
> Actually I walked passed an ice-cream place today and made sure to
> look in the window and check out the menu, sure enough they listed single
> and double dips.

US Midwest, '50s and '60s: "double dip" meant two scoops of ice cream.

--
Bear

rob...@bestweb.net

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Jul 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/22/99
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On 1999-07-21 m...@nohormelproducts.dere.com said:

>Ice Milk vs. Ice Cream is completely dependent on fat content.
>That's it. McDonald's used to call their Soft-Serve cones "Soft
>Serve cones" (or just "cone [or sundae]) for years and nailed
>employees who said "ice cream" until they changed to a higher-fat
>mix which could be labelled "ice cream".
>Sorry I forget the cut-off percentage of fat.

That's what I thought, until beginning just a few yrs. ago I saw "fat free
ice cream". Did the rules change?

Alan Hamilton

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Jul 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/23/99
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Are you sure it wasn't worded as "FAT FREE ICE CREAM-style frozen
dessert"?
--
/
/ * / Alan Hamilton
* * al...@primenet.com

StarChaser <Anti spam feature in address.>

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Jul 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/23/99
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On Wed, 21 Jul 1999 12:29:47 -0400, Margaret Kane Schoen
<mk...@zd.com> wrote:

>I'll ad my two cents as a veteran Carvel worker from New Jersey. I can't
>recall ever hearing the phrase double dip referring to two scoops. Double
>scoop yes. A dip (to me) means the Dairy Queen thing mentioned above.

I understood what he meant by 'double-dip', although I've always heard
it called 'two scoops'...

>Maybe it's an older term? I know when I worked at Carvel I would get people
>coming in asking for things like a Brown Cow and whatnot, and I would just
>stare at them blankly, given that this was conversation was taking place in
>1982, not 1952.

Oo! I like brown cows...<Rootbeer floats...>
--

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and information on which artists do and do not want their
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rob...@bestweb.net

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Jul 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/23/99
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On 1999-07-23 al...@primenet.com(AlanHamilton) said:

>>That's what I thought, until beginning just a few yrs. ago I saw
>>"fat free ice cream". Did the rules change?

>Are you sure it wasn't worded as "FAT FREE ICE CREAM-style frozen
>dessert"?
>--

Certain. I looked close for just such weasel words. My guess is that the
dam finally broke at the US Dept of Agriculture, or FDA, or somewhere, and
now they're bending over backwards to change the language in ways that seem
to encourage "healthy" eating.

Matt Ackeret

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Jul 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/23/99
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In article <3797d494....@news.primenet.com>,

Alan Hamilton <al...@primenet.com> wrote:
>On Thu, 22 Jul 1999 20:39:48 GMT, rob...@bestweb.net wrote:
>
>>On 1999-07-21 m...@nohormelproducts.dere.com said:
>>
>> >Ice Milk vs. Ice Cream is completely dependent on fat content.
>> >That's it. McDonald's used to call their Soft-Serve cones "Soft
>> >Serve cones" (or just "cone [or sundae]) for years and nailed
>> >employees who said "ice cream" until they changed to a higher-fat
>> >mix which could be labelled "ice cream".
>> >Sorry I forget the cut-off percentage of fat.
>>
>>That's what I thought, until beginning just a few yrs. ago I saw "fat free
>>ice cream". Did the rules change?
>
>Are you sure it wasn't worded as "FAT FREE ICE CREAM-style frozen
>dessert"?

Well, I can't recall seeing "fat free ice cream", but I have some
ice cream that is called "Light" (at least one time that was legally
meaningless), but they also call it 'lowfat ice cream'. I'll try to
remember to check when I get home. It's Safeway's house brand "high quality"
ice cream (half quart cylinder that has an actual top) vs the regular ice cream
(half quart rectangular solid with a top that usually doesn't open unless you
cut it with a knife). Besides having more interesting flavors in the
"high quality" one, I can't tell a huge amount of difference.

Anyway, the 'low fat chocolate chip cookie dough' that I have is noticably
different from the regular chocolate chip cookie dough, but I don't consider
it _worse_, and the difference in calories is amazing. I think it's
120 vs 180 calories in their ridiculously-small "serving size", so a real world
bowl has significantly fewer (IMHO) calories.

Yeah, I know some people scoff at the very idea of getting junk food
that's low fat or low calorie -- but if it's an acceptable substitute for
the full calorie version, I'll get the lower calorie one.
--
mat...@area.com

Linda Harden

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Jul 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/27/99
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Alan Hamilton <al...@primenet.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 22 Jul 1999 20:39:48 GMT, rob...@bestweb.net wrote:

> >That's what I thought, until beginning just a few yrs. ago I saw "fat free
> >ice cream". Did the rules change?

> Are you sure it wasn't worded as "FAT FREE ICE CREAM-style frozen
> dessert"?

I just went and looked in the freezer at my stash of fat-free
ice cream. It says "Dreyer's Fat-Free Ice Cream." No "frozen dessert" on
there. Hmmm. I wonder when they changed the rules... Haven't seen
anything labelled "ice milk" in a really long time.


Linda

--
"You may look upon the future and behold: It will be boring."
-Robert Gilmore

The Avocado Avenger

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Jul 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/27/99
to
Linda Harden <lha...@ra.ucolick.org> writes:
>Alan Hamilton <al...@primenet.com> wrote:
>> On Thu, 22 Jul 1999 20:39:48 GMT, rob...@bestweb.net wrote:

>> >That's what I thought, until beginning just a few yrs. ago I saw "fat free
>> >ice cream". Did the rules change?

>> Are you sure it wasn't worded as "FAT FREE ICE CREAM-style frozen
>> dessert"?

> I just went and looked in the freezer at my stash of fat-free
>ice cream. It says "Dreyer's Fat-Free Ice Cream." No "frozen dessert" on
>there. Hmmm. I wonder when they changed the rules... Haven't seen
>anything labelled "ice milk" in a really long time.

You know, I actually looked in the freezer section of my grocery store
the other day because of this question, and, indeed, every "fat free"
frozen confection was "fat free ice cream". Is it perhaps because they
use cream with no fat? But, isn't cream with no fat actually milk? The
ingredients list contains "skim milk" but no cream at all.
I used to buy ice milk exclusively, but now, I find that the only thing
that resembles ice milk is "light ice cream". The best I can tell, the
taste is the same.

Greg Goss

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Jul 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/28/99
to
al...@primenet.com (Alan Hamilton) wrote:

>On Thu, 22 Jul 1999 20:39:48 GMT, rob...@bestweb.net wrote:
>

>>On 1999-07-21 m...@nohormelproducts.dere.com said:
>>
>> >Ice Milk vs. Ice Cream is completely dependent on fat content.
>> >That's it. McDonald's used to call their Soft-Serve cones "Soft
>> >Serve cones" (or just "cone [or sundae]) for years and nailed
>> >employees who said "ice cream" until they changed to a higher-fat
>> >mix which could be labelled "ice cream".
>> >Sorry I forget the cut-off percentage of fat.
>>

>>That's what I thought, until beginning just a few yrs. ago I saw "fat free
>>ice cream". Did the rules change?
>
>Are you sure it wasn't worded as "FAT FREE ICE CREAM-style frozen
>dessert"?

If you can buy fat free sour cream, is anything forbidden?

I don't see the fat free ICE cream around here, but we buy the sour
cream all the time, and there is nothing special on the label other
than a mention of the butterfat content.

J. Michael Looney

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Jul 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/30/99
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On 29-Jul-1999, ket...@seemysig.com wrote:

> What if you used soy milk to make ice cream? I wonder what the
> resulting product would be like. Please, no knee-jerk wanking about
> how "awful
> it would be". I'm thinking seriously about this.

Not sure it would work. I do know that you can not make pudding (I.e.
the stuff they sell in powdered form) with Soy or Rice milk. My wife
tried. Did not set up, even after several days.

--
Silliness is the last refuge of the doomed P. Opus
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Dana Carpender

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Jul 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/30/99
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ket...@seemysig.com wrote:

> Zetan's Book of Enlightenment reveals that on 27 Jul 1999 22:11:06 GMT, The


> Avocado Avenger wrote:
>
> > You know, I actually looked in the freezer section of my grocery store
> >the other day because of this question, and, indeed, every "fat free"
> >frozen confection was "fat free ice cream". Is it perhaps because they
> >use cream with no fat? But, isn't cream with no fat actually milk? The
> >ingredients list contains "skim milk" but no cream at all.
> > I used to buy ice milk exclusively, but now, I find that the only thing
> >that resembles ice milk is "light ice cream". The best I can tell, the
> >taste is the same.
>

> What if you used soy milk to make ice cream? I wonder what the resulting
> product would be like. Please, no knee-jerk wanking about how "awful it
> would be". I'm thinking seriously about this.

Well, there's Tofutti, and Tofutti Lite. Not invented as a "health" product
(and just as well -- *loaded* with sugar, and sky-high on the glycemic index),
but rather by an observant Jew who wanted to be able to have "ice cream" after
a steak dinner. IIRC, tastes quite similar to ice cream.
--
Dana W. Carpender
Author, _How I Gave Up My Low Fat Diet and Lost Forty Pounds!_
Hold the Toast Press
http://www.holdthetoast.com

Matt Ackeret

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Jul 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/30/99
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In article <37a2c9fa...@usenet.idirect.com>,

Greg Goss <gg...@direct.ca> wrote:
>If you can buy fat free sour cream, is anything forbidden?

And if you care more about the calories than the fat (which I do.. something
could be loaded with fat and cholesterol and sugar, if it were lower
calorie, and I'd buy it)...

Anyway, if you care about the calories, get the _fat free_ sour cream,
instead of the _light_ sour cream. Strangely, the fat free is always lower
calorie, from the various brands I've seen in supermarkets.

And yeah, sure, it does taste different than regular sour cream, but I'm
not eating it plain -- using it as chip dip or sometimes ranch dip..
Yeah yeah yeah, make the joke about if you're eating it with potato chips,
why care about calories? It's a funny joke, but I don't think reasonable.
If you're, with virtually no effort, cutting out a bunch of calories you
_would have_ eaten, it's an advantage to me as long as it doesn't taste
horrible. (Most diet soda is horrible, but I've found Diet Mountain Dew,
and thus have cut out _a lot_ of calories by drinking it instead of
regular soda the vast majority of the time.. even though I'll still go
to McDonalds for lunch.)
--
mat...@area.com

Paul Guertin

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Jul 31, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/31/99
to
ket...@seemysig.com wrote:

> What if you used soy milk to make ice cream? I wonder what the resulting
> product would be like. Please, no knee-jerk wanking about how "awful it
> would be". I'm thinking seriously about this.

I've got four words for you: "Goat milk ice cream." Does it exist?
If not, why not? Mmmm... goaty...

Paul Guertin
p...@sff.net

The Avocado Avenger

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Jul 31, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/31/99
to
mat...@area.com (Matt Ackeret) writes:

>And yeah, sure, it does taste different than regular sour cream, but I'm
>not eating it plain -- using it as chip dip or sometimes ranch dip..
>Yeah yeah yeah, make the joke about if you're eating it with potato chips,
>why care about calories? It's a funny joke, but I don't think reasonable.
>If you're, with virtually no effort, cutting out a bunch of calories you
>_would have_ eaten, it's an advantage to me as long as it doesn't taste
>horrible. (Most diet soda is horrible, but I've found Diet Mountain Dew,
>and thus have cut out _a lot_ of calories by drinking it instead of
>regular soda the vast majority of the time.. even though I'll still go
>to McDonalds for lunch.)

I've heard that joke a lot about ordering a huge burger and fries then a
"diet Coke" ... but at a fast food joint, the mediums of a regular soda
would be around 300 calories, maybe more. So if you're going to splurge
on a burger and fries, why not save some calories and get a diet? I mean,
if you like the taste.

minmei

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Jul 31, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/31/99
to
The product is called Rice Dream, there are several others but Rice Dream is
pretty good. Though I prefer nice fruity chunky sorbet better. Damn Vegan
bf's!
minmei

J. Michael Looney <j...@spellbooksoftware.com> wrote in message
news:rq396k$0$37nsp8d$3...@news.supernews.com...

> On 29-Jul-1999, ket...@seemysig.com wrote:

> > What if you used soy milk to make ice cream? I wonder what the
> > resulting product would be like. Please, no knee-jerk wanking about
> > how "awful
> > it would be". I'm thinking seriously about this.

> Not sure it would work. I do know that you can not make pudding (I.e.

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