Aurora 6500 diesel

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hub...@ccanoemail.ca

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Mar 15, 2020, 1:36:44 PM3/15/20
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Wondering if anyone here is familar with this unit
< or similar small deisel units >
How noisy are they compared to gasoline ?
< both being 3600 rpm >

https://manualzz.com/doc/1905972/aurora-agi6500de-specifications

There's one coming up at a local auction sale.
John T.

ads

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Mar 15, 2020, 10:56:20 PM3/15/20
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From some research I did a couple years ago,
https://www.homerenergy.com/products/pro/docs/3.11/generator_lifetime.html
the noise is comparable to a gas gen unless there is extra sound
deadening added. The life of an air-cooled diesel is several times
longer than the life of a similarly-sized gas engine but mostly
because they have to be built better to handle the higher compression.

hub...@ccanoemail.ca

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Mar 16, 2020, 10:17:03 AM3/16/20
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Thanks. I'm not real keen to buy another noisy generator,
but I might visit the auction out of curiosity .. in case it sells
really cheap ..
John T.

Jim Wilkins

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Mar 16, 2020, 1:56:25 PM3/16/20
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<hub...@ccanoemail.ca> wrote in message
news:2l2v6fdrbat3rbq0v...@4ax.com...
I built a fairly effective generator sound-reducing enclosure from 2'
x 4' fireproof acoustic ceiling tiles, rimmed with sheet metal |_|
strips to keep the edges from crumbling. It's assembled with thumb
screws and U spring nuts.
https://www.lowes.com/pl/Spring-nuts-Nuts-Fasteners-Hardware/4294710807

The side facing away from the street is open to let cooling air in and
the exhaust out. I tried muffling the exhaust with fiberglass pipe
insulation and found that most of the noise comes from the engine
block.



hub...@ccanoemail.ca

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Mar 16, 2020, 2:44:22 PM3/16/20
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Over the years, I've thought about a makeshift sound barrier -
- usually I talk myself out of it when I start to consider all the
fire/wind/rain/snow possibilities ...
I have heard that engine noise is a major factor -
- not just exhaust noise.
John T.

Jim Wilkins

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Mar 16, 2020, 5:58:01 PM3/16/20
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<hub...@ccanoemail.ca> wrote in message
news:67iv6fdtuldtkp4kd...@4ax.com...
The Home Depot ceiling tiles I used resist a propane torch flame quite
well. I have some corrugated galvy roofing to cover it from rain or
snow though it hasn't been tested. A weighted tarp would probably
work.

At first I taped the tiles' edges with aluminum foil duct tape, which
didn't stick well enough to be a permanent solution but it protected
them from shredding while I fitted and pop-riveted the sheet steel
channel |_| sections, which were cut and folded from a scrapped
above-ground pool.

I used a shear and brake, but thin sheet steel can be bent neatly
without a brake by clamping it between planks along the bend line and
hammering on a block of wood placed against the free side to spread
the force and sharpen the bend along the bend line.


hub...@ccanoemail.ca

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Mar 16, 2020, 6:09:47 PM3/16/20
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On Mon, 16 Mar 2020 17:58:23 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
Thanks for the ideas.
Is yours a simple knock-down design when not in use ?
John T.

Jim Wilkins

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Mar 16, 2020, 7:10:07 PM3/16/20
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<hub...@ccanoemail.ca> wrote in message
news:j9uv6f5mbg3ar2b82...@4ax.com...
The corners of the back wall have angular brackets that extend forward
to brace the sides when assembled, or hold all the panels nested
together for transport and storage. I considered hinging the sides to
the back but the sheet steel I used is too thin to stand the strain.
The unattached top panel lifts off to service the genny.


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