Finding GOLD

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shann...@hotmail.com

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Apr 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/23/99
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Want to find GOLD rings, watches, jewelry,
money clips, and coins.

Ordinarily you'd need a metal detector.
But...we're cheap here and we can dispense
with that.

So, go to the park around the swingsets
and the merry-go-round. Kids and adults lose
their rings and coins into the sand around
these areas. You don't really need a metal
detector to find them. Instead just sift a
little sand and you'll find GOLD!

Start out by "tracking" around that merry
go round. Get something to sift the sand.
Maybe a handscoop and one of those plastic
carry baskets like you see in virtually every
grocery store. Or, use your kitty litter scoop.
The kind that is oversize and with holes in it
for the sand to flow out.

Use your senses to tell you where and when to
look. Try before 8 o'clock in the morning before
all the people and kids show back up. Look in the
sand for signs of ACTIVITY under the swingset. You
can look and see which swing gets the use. Which
ones are little used. Start scooping the sand into
your basket and sifting for GOLD. I find more rings
around the merry-go-round area.

A cheap improvement to this method is a CHEAP metal
detector. Ask your husband if he has a "stud detector".
The one I have has 3 settings: one for studs, one for
electric wires, and a setting for METAL. Take this
cheapy metal detector with you to the park. You could
tie it to a broom and run it over the sand. Or better
yet, pass it over the sand which you have scooped into
the basket. It should tell you if there's gold or coins
in it.

Sift a little sand and have some fun with it. I guarantee
you will easily find a few rings each week --with just a
bit of sifting. You'll also find a few dollars in change.

I'd be interested to hear how others make out in their
search for GOLD!

-----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------
http://www.dejanews.com/ Search, Read, Discuss, or Start Your Own

Melanie Piper

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Apr 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/23/99
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shann...@hotmail.com wrote:
>
> Want to find GOLD rings, watches, jewelry,
> money clips, and coins.
>
> Ordinarily you'd need a metal detector.
> But...we're cheap here and we can dispense
> with that.
>
> So, go to the park around the swingsets
> and the merry-go-round. Kids and adults lose
> their rings and coins into the sand around
> these areas. You don't really need a metal
> detector to find them. Instead just sift a
> little sand and you'll find GOLD!

Coins maybe, these days, but "my Momma taught me" that anything
else you find is *not yours*. You don't need to know whose it
is or whether they'll come back to look for it, you just need
to know it's *not yours*. Otherwise it's stealing.

What if the ring or whatever, however valuable or cheap, has
great sentimental value to whoever lost it and they'll come
back as soon as they can to look for it and ask around and put
up posters et al???

Yes, you can tell yourself that if you don't take it, someone
else will. IMO, that doesn't change anything. You aren't
responsible for what someone else might do, you are responsible
for what *you* do.

That said, I have gone "metal detecting" with my son a few
times when he was younger and it can be a great "sport" and a
neat thing to do with a kid. Anything just laying on top of
the ground was "off limits" for us to take, but we found some
really neat things buried under the surface. A few coins, an
old chauffeurs badge, many things that we'd speculate about
what they were and what they might have been used for.

Here, the major newspaper lets people place "found" ads for
free for pets. They do charge a bit for found things other
than pets, but if they person really wants their item back,
they'll usually pay for the ad, IME. A few times when a ring
or something was just laying there, I've picked it up and
placed an ad. Only once did anyone claim the ring, but they
were *soooo* grateful...said it was a cheap ring but meant a
lot to them.

Melanie

Bear

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Apr 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/23/99
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Actually I've done pretty well finding gold IN the skip. People toss out
jewelry boxes full of mostly costume jewelry. Mixed in you'll usually find
the ocassional broken chain or bent-up herringbone of 14K, sometimes a ring,
lone earrings, etc. Once I found what looked to be an inventory of some
"party-style sales" for sterling. Apts. are the best for this type of metal
prospecting. The added advantage is that I have NO moral qualms about
keeping any of this "TRASH"!
Dive Daily!
BBB<Bear>

Susanne koenig (Tuciemae in AOL)

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Apr 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/23/99
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Hi Guys! I've been out of pocket--in Mississippi for two weeks.

Another good place to look for a lot of loose change is around an unmanned
toll collector. My friend Susan used to get around ten dollars every time
she went.

Sk
Bear <bb...@iserv.net> wrote in message
news:rs_T2.5126$Bm3.3...@news20.ispnews.com...

SalHemings

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Apr 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/23/99
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I have the same experience as Bear. When folks move out, they often toss
entire drawers or boxes full of little things. And that's where I find the
gold & silver jewelry.

Mary
Changing Lives Through Dumpster Diving
"If you paid, you paid too much."

HelmetMaker

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Apr 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/23/99
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Susanne koenig (Tuciemae in AOL) wrote:
>
> Hi Guys! I've been out of pocket--in Mississippi for two weeks.
>
> Another good place to look for a lot of loose change is around an unmanned
> toll collector. My friend Susan used to get around ten dollars every time
> she went.
thats got to be illegal(how do you spell that?)

Mister fix

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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>Another good place to look for a lot of loose change is around an unmanned
>> toll collector.

>thats got to be illegal(how do you spell that?)

I don't know about illegal, but it really gets the cars behind you at the toll
plaza upset! I have on occasion picked up change at the unmanned booths when I
was driving trucks in the Chicago area. Some days it was enough for lunch.

You are only young once, but you can stay immature indefinitely.
- Ogden Nash

BearFacGrl

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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>Another good place to look for a lot of loose change is around an unmanned
>toll collector.

I would think the same would apply to fast food drive up windows. I, for one,
have dropped change there many times....LOL....tho, unlike most people, I go
after it. <grin>

Cheers,
Kari


Mankatt

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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>thats got to be illegal(how do you spell that?)

on the ground??????? huh??

shann...@hotmail.com

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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Melanie informs us that finding jewelry in
a public park is "stealing". Neither under
the law nor under dictates of Christian nor
Jewish law.

But, Melanie, by ALL means, if you feel you
should recover coins and jewelry which were
lost in a public venue and then spend
additional money (newspaper, phone calls,
posting placards, etc) trying to find "the
real owners", I applaud your misplaced sense
of honesty!

So, I suggest you certainly SHOULD budget at
least a few hours each week scavenging coins
and jewelry. Then another few hours trying to
"restore" them.

I suppose using that same logic, when I buy a
security from my broker and realize a good
capital gain, I ought to find the original seller
and "restore" his capital gain to him.

In actual fact, in Treasure Hunting magazines, I
have read letters and stories of persons attempting
to locate owners of rings and jewelry. In most every
case, the person coming forward who asserts they
"lost this ring" were opportunistic scam artists.
Your misplaced value system would merely transfer
the value of a found item to whoever CLAIMS that
they lost an item. But, again, if you have an
overweaning desire to impose a nonChristian moral
compass upon yourself (an apparent desire to punish
yourself?), please don't let anything deter you.

As for me, I'll continue to hunt for GOLD and be
secure in the knowledge that the found item is the
legal and moral property of the finder.

R

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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On Sat, 24 Apr 1999 07:02:41 GMT, shann...@hotmail.com wrote:

>Melanie informs us that finding jewelry in
>a public park is "stealing". Neither under
>the law nor under dictates of Christian nor
>Jewish law.

This is a rather limited list of sources for moral imperatives.



>
>But, Melanie, by ALL means, if you feel you
>should recover coins and jewelry which were
>lost in a public venue and then spend
>additional money (newspaper, phone calls,
>posting placards, etc) trying to find "the
>real owners", I applaud your misplaced sense
>of honesty!
>

I agree, I also applaud Melanie; but don't find her sense of honesty
to be misplaced.

When I had a larger quantity of cash than I usually carry plus some
checks fall out of my wallet someone like Melanie took it all to the
cops, who called me. Actually, I think it had been turned in to the
guys at the gas station and they had second thoughts after telling me
it had not been found. Easier to keep it if there is no face
connected to the found cash (or GOLD).

I was glad it was found by someone who was not ...

>secure in the knowledge that the found item is the
>legal and moral property of the finder.
>

R

Melanie Piper

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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shann...@hotmail.com wrote:
>
> Melanie informs us that finding jewelry in
> a public park is "stealing". Neither under
> the law nor under dictates of Christian nor
> Jewish law.

"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

Seems to cover most situations, IMO. IIUC it's the overriding
"law" of Christianity and I've seen it quoted by a famous
Jewish rabbi as a similar "umbrella rule".

You sound like the kind of person who'd beat your child until
there's "a law against it", and then find some other way to
rationalize or make excuses for what you're doing.

> But, Melanie, by ALL means, if you feel you
> should recover coins and jewelry which were
> lost in a public venue and then spend
> additional money (newspaper, phone calls,
> posting placards, etc) trying to find "the
> real owners", I applaud your misplaced sense
> of honesty!

No need for applause. What goes around comes around.

> So, I suggest you certainly SHOULD budget at
> least a few hours each week scavenging coins
> and jewelry. Then another few hours trying to
> "restore" them.

Nope, can't afford the time for the scavenging. Need it for
returning stuff to it's rightful owners when I can, and other
better things; the day I can't afford the time or tiny bit of
money to do *that* is the day I know I've left examining my
life a little or a lot too long.

> I suppose using that same logic, when I buy a
> security from my broker and realize a good
> capital gain, I ought to find the original seller
> and "restore" his capital gain to him.

Apples and oranges. Players in financial markets know the game
and accept the rules of the game, for the most part. A person
who lost something in a park didn't do that on purpose or, in
the case of a ring, likely even know it happened until later.
Deliberate action (selling the security) v.s. an accidental
occurance that could happen to anyone.

"Lost" in everyday life implies accidental loss; otherwise one
would say "left" or "threw out". "Lost" in financial markets
means one took a gamble and it didn't come out the way they'd
hoped.

> In actual fact, in Treasure Hunting magazines, I
> have read letters and stories of persons attempting
> to locate owners of rings and jewelry. In most every
> case, the person coming forward who asserts they
> "lost this ring" were opportunistic scam artists.
> Your misplaced value system would merely transfer
> the value of a found item to whoever CLAIMS that
> they lost an item.

Doesn't fit with my experience. Maybe it varies with location
or country (I'm in Canada) and maybe "Treasure Hunters" tend to
be the kind of people who rationalize keeping what they find
based on just one or two experiences, and use those one or two
experiences as their excuse forever after. There is such a
thing as "group rationalization".

I know that here where I live, there are often human-interest
stories on the news broadcasts of people "doing a good deed"
and returning lost cherished articles to their rightful
owners. I'd doubt the people who were shown on tv expressing
their delight and thanks that their (whatever) had been found
and returned would be doing that on tv if the articles weren't
actually theirs--on tv where the rightful owners might see
them.

Our police department says they have few people ever trying to
claim what isn't rightfully theirs, even when it's large or
small amounts of *cash*. Same with our public transit system.
Just a couple of weeks ago a local tv channel even showed a
couple of very old photos and a medal/medallion that someone
had found, because it was recognized that they may have been
cherished and lost by someone.

But, again, if you have an
> overweaning desire to impose a nonChristian moral
> compass upon yourself (an apparent desire to punish
> yourself?), please don't let anything deter you.

"Non-Christian moral compass"??? You make it sound like it's
un-Christian if I try to return a lost item to its rightful
owner. Then you figure the "Christian thing to do" is to
deliberately *not* try to return the item and keep it for
yourself or sell it?? How did you arrive at that convoluted
logic? (please don't answer, those were meant as rhetorical
questions; rhetorical questions are meant for you to think
about, not answer)

I *do* consider myself a Christian, and my over-riding "moral
compass" is the same as taught by all the different types of
Christian churches I've investigated, the Jewish faith, and
many other kinds of religions too (though those say the same
thing in different words). My moral compass is: "Do unto
others as you would have them do unto you."

BTW, none of my many dictionaries has "overweaning". I think
you must have meant overwhelming or overbearing. There is
"overweening" but that means "thinking too much of oneself"
(derived from an Old English term that meant "becoming
insolent")--don't think that was what you were going for.

> As for me, I'll continue to hunt for GOLD and be

> secure in the knowledge that the found item is the
> legal and moral property of the finder.

Of course you'll do as you wish. Legal depends on the laws
where you happen to be, and if all of us felt compelled to do
everything there wasn't a law against, there'd be a heck of a
lot more laws and the world would be a sorrier place, IMO.

Moral depends on the *honest* (non-rationalizing,
non-self-deluding) understanding of the individual given their
level of knowledge, understanding, and life experience. You'll
never convince me that something is your "moral property" based
on the fact that you found it.

Melanie

HelmetMaker

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
to
shann...@hotmail.com wrote:
>
> Melanie informs us that finding jewelry in
> a public park is "stealing". Neither under
> the law nor under dictates of Christian nor
> Jewish law.
>
> But, Melanie, by ALL means, if you feel you
> should recover coins and jewelry which were
> lost in a public venue and then spend
> additional money (newspaper, phone calls,
> posting placards, etc) trying to find "the
> real owners", I applaud your misplaced sense
> of honesty!
>
> So, I suggest you certainly SHOULD budget at
> least a few hours each week scavenging coins
> and jewelry. Then another few hours trying to
> "restore" them.
>
> I suppose using that same logic, when I buy a
> security from my broker and realize a good
> capital gain, I ought to find the original seller
> and "restore" his capital gain to him.
>
> In actual fact, in Treasure Hunting magazines, I
> have read letters and stories of persons attempting
> to locate owners of rings and jewelry. In most every
> case, the person coming forward who asserts they
> "lost this ring" were opportunistic scam artists.
> Your misplaced value system would merely transfer
> the value of a found item to whoever CLAIMS that
> they lost an item. But, again, if you have an

> overweaning desire to impose a nonChristian moral
> compass upon yourself (an apparent desire to punish
> yourself?), please don't let anything deter you.
>
> As for me, I'll continue to hunt for GOLD and be
> secure in the knowledge that the found item is the
> legal and moral property of the finder.
>
> -----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------
> http://www.dejanews.com/ Search, Read, Discuss, or Start Your Own
Bravo!

HelmetMaker

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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I had a dream once where I was walking down the street(a busy one with
lots of stores on it)
therewas a wallet with 20 dollar bills hanging out of it(it was at the
curbside)
I picked it up and went right into the store there and handed it over to
the store clerk.
she thanked me and the rest is a bit fuzzy(hard to remember)
did I do the right thing or not?

HelmetMaker

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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Mankatt wrote:
>
> >thats got to be illegal(how do you spell that?)
>
> on the ground??????? huh??
what are you trying to say?(on the ground??????? huh??)
plaese someone explain this to me.

Sheryl McGee

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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Wonderful Melanie.. This is why I have always enjoyed your posts.
Direct and to the point.

Joan E. Smith

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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Lost property is not abandoned property. The procedure is to take it to the
police, make a report. If no one claims it in 30 days, then it's yours.

Recall the Tom Hanks movie with the big slobbering dog? Kids had found a
baggie of money, and that's exactly the procedure explained.

Joan


BearFacGrl

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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>When I had a larger quantity of cash than I usually carry plus some
>checks fall out of my wallet someone like Melanie took it all to the
>cops, who called me.

Yes -- I've had this happen *twice* -- both times I was carrying over $100 (had
just cashed paycheck)....and both times it came back to me.

At the time, I was a "starving" college student -- and was in tears over losing
that money. The people who were honest enough to turn that money in were in no
better shape than I was -- and probably could have used the money. I was
*very* grateful. I would do the same.

Cheers,
Kari

linda-renee

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
to
Joan E. Smith wrote:

> Lost property is not abandoned property. The procedure is to take it to the
> police, make a report. If no one claims it in 30 days, then it's yours.

I once found a bulging wallet in the middle of a mall parking lot. I
didn't even look inside, but immediately took it to the mall office and
let them figure out what to do with it. It was only later that it
occurred to me that I could have helped myself out.
--
Linda

This space available for rent! Call now!

HelmetMaker

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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never mind I uderstand it,I said,"its got to be illegal",I did not say I
thought it was wrong to pick up the money

John Kiljan

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
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Joan E. Smith wrote:

> Lost property is not abandoned property. The procedure is to take it to the
> police, make a report. If no one claims it in 30 days, then it's yours.
>

> Recall the Tom Hanks movie with the big slobbering dog? Kids had found a
> baggie of money, and that's exactly the procedure explained.
>
> Joan

I used to think that too till an incident last year when a local kid found a bag
of money not far from his school and turned it into the county sheriff's
office. It was over a $1,000. When the press praised the kid for his honesty,
the sheriff pointed out that if it were not properly claimed in the required
time, state law required it to become the property of the county. Not a very
good incentive for kids to turn in lost property.

The only happy ending was that a legitimate owner was found and she paid a
voluntary reward to the child.

I hope your state is wiser than Colorado.

-- John Kiljan


sweetchild

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Apr 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/24/99
to
I do also think that if you find an item that some attempt should be made to
return the item to the rightful owner- and I have a little story to share my
distaste for total opportunists.
My ex MIL is a pretty nice person in general but she has had a bad habit for
years. She goes to her local park when she is walking her dogs and picks up
every piece of usable items she can find that kids have happened to leave
behind. Over the years she has picked up many coats, hats, baseball gloves,
balls, hockey equipment and many other items. She also finds jewelry . This
makes me mad because when my kids lose items after being at a park etc, I
usually make them go back to retrieve the item(s) and hope that others
aren't out there taking the items- I would expect a kid to MAYBE grab
something but certainly not an adult!! . I always say to my ex MIL " What if
the kid had no other coat to wear or their parents just bought them that BB
glove with their last money and the kid is in major trouble for losing this
item and is now frantically searching in the park for his lost goods??" Her
response is " that's their tough luck!!" Is this right? I think not. Please
think of someone's situation they may end up being in if you cannot
rationalize the money or the sentimental aspect of losing something-. I too
have found a few wallets in parking lots and supermarkets and I could have
run off with the wallet but I could never do that- it gives me great
pleasure seeing a sense of relief on a panic-stricken person's face when I
hand over their rightfully owned item.

BearFacGrl

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Apr 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/25/99
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>it gives me great
>pleasure seeing a sense of relief on a panic-stricken person's face when
>I
>hand over their rightfully owned item.

Yes -- I agree. And quite frankly -- when you return something, you are not
just restoring an *item*....a *thing.* You could quite possibly be restoring
their *faith* in humanity.

:-)

Cheers,
Kari

angela

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Apr 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/25/99
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BearFacGrl <bearf...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:19990425055428...@ng-cg1.aol.com...

I may have missed it, but has anybody pointed out the difference between
picking up spare change, and picking up and keeping jewelry and other
valuable lost items? NOBODY can identify a lost quarter, and why would they
bother anyway? But a lost gold ring or bracelet might have great sentimental
value. I would try to find the owner of a ring or bracelet, even at my own
expense. The quarter, though....finder's keepers.

--angela

Joan E. Smith

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Apr 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/25/99
to
> Lost property is not abandoned property. The procedure is to take it to
the
> police, make a report. If no one claims it in 30 days, then it's yours.
>
> Recall the Tom Hanks movie with the big slobbering dog? Kids had found a
> baggie of money, and that's exactly the procedure explained.
>
This is overbroad, as not all states play the same game by the same rules.

Joan

Bear

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Apr 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/25/99
to
Don't worry about it. I find a lot of stuff that I wouldn't toss. If it was
in a commercial dumpster and household trash, it was put there
intentionally. Some of us have even been known to remove it as a nuisance.
Mary likes to find addresses and mail the "dumpee" reprimand letters.
Personally I'd drop it off at their front door, BUTT hey that's
MY-never-to-be-humble opinion........
Dive Daily!
BBB<Bear>

Cheerie Silverman wrote in message <3723B094...@home.com>...
> This whole thread has got me thinking (uh oh) about times I've found
>large amounts of personal items in what are clearly commercial
>dumpsters. Often there are things I can't imagine throwing out: family


Cheerie Silverman

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
This whole thread has got me thinking (uh oh) about times I've found
large amounts of personal items in what are clearly commercial
dumpsters. Often there are things I can't imagine throwing out: family
pictures, silver plated dinnerware, personal letters, etc. (no
gold/silver jewelry) and I wonder if the owners actually were moving and
just wanted to dump their unwanted stuff as conveniently as possible or
was this stuff stolen? and did thieves dump what they considered
valueless?
I have neither the time nor the desire to make an ass out of myself
trying to track down the owners of every 'suspicious' dumpster find but
I know some of the thrill will be missing from now on. And I'll wonder
'Is someone missing these photos, knick-knacks, etc.?' and get all
sentimental and sappy and probably go away saddened and empty handed.

Now Suffering from Melancholy,
Cheerie

Melanie Piper

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
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HelmetMaker wrote:

> I had a dream once where I was walking down the street(a busy one with
> lots of stores on it)
> therewas a wallet with 20 dollar bills hanging out of it(it was at the
> curbside)
> I picked it up and went right into the store there and handed it over to
> the store clerk.
> she thanked me and the rest is a bit fuzzy(hard to remember)
> did I do the right thing or not?

I'd say yes, you did the right thing. Didn't you feel good in
the dream when you did that? That good feeling should tell you
something, IMO.

I chuckled as I read about your dream. I've had similar
dreams, in a series close together. When I thought about the
dreams and what was happening in my life at the time, here's
what I figured out.

Theory: Someone in my life had been trying to "lay a guilt
trip" on me to try to get me to do something they wanted me to
do that I just *wasn't* going to do.

They were sending an implied message that because I didn't jump
at the chance to do them this big "favor", I wasn't a "good
person".

I figure that via the dreams, my subconscious was trying to
show me that I *was* a good person, and telling me to blow off
the guilt-trip.

Melanie

Cheerie Silverman

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
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Bear wrote:
>
> Don't worry about it. I find a lot of stuff that I wouldn't toss. If it was
> in a commercial dumpster and household trash, it was put there
> intentionally. Some of us have even been known to remove it as a nuisance.
> Mary likes to find addresses and mail the "dumpee" reprimand letters.
> Personally I'd drop it off at their front door, BUTT hey that's
> MY-never-to-be-humble opinion........
> Dive Daily!
> BBB<Bear>

I live on a dead end street, next to a state park. There is a
'turn-around' area next to my house and, for some inexplicable reason, a
few people seem to think this is the place to dump their garbage
(especially Christmas trash).
I ALWAYS delicately pick through the dumped garbage until I find
something that tells me who the garbage belongs to (and I am always
successful), then I cheerfully take it back to them.
Of course, when I see people taking a piss in the bushes at the
turn-around, I have no problem yelling out my window "THIS ISN'T YOUR
BATHROOM!". I think I've been responsible for a few 'pinched
weenies'...much to my delight as I mutter 'teach you to ever pee outside
my house again, and don't bring me any of your stinky garbage anymore
either.'
Cheerie

Bear

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
So we have a DREAM Sequence now? Certainly off the beaten track topic wise?
What I do in MY dreams I sure wouldn't post here! I do know the difference
between dreams and REALITY!
Dive Daily!
BBB<Bear>
Melanie Piper wrote in message:

>HelmetMaker wrote:
>> I had a dream once where I was walking down the street(a busy one with
>> lots of stores on it)
>> therewas a wallet with 20 dollar bills hanging out of it(it was at the
>> curbside)
>> I picked it up and went right into the store there and handed it over to
>> the store clerk.
>> she thanked me and the rest is a bit fuzzy(hard to remember)
>> did I do the right thing or not?
>

dcat...@bellsouth.net

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
i have lived in miami fl all my life and unfortunately what you talk about is
nothing but fantasy as far as i'm concerned.....

if you loose it...tough luck...you'll probably never see it again...learn to
take care of your stuff..
robert
miami


In article <92500711...@news.remarQ.com>,

> run off with the wallet but I could never do that- it gives me great


> pleasure seeing a sense of relief on a panic-stricken person's face when I
> hand over their rightfully owned item.
>
>

-----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------

dcat...@bellsouth.net

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
i think some of these folks are in a fantasy world here.....

you go buy a metal detector at a hundred or more dollars, you hit the parks
and beaches in search of treasure, you find treasure and then are supposed to
put up ads in local papers and posts at local boards about what you found?
NOT! unless i'm getting paid for this (which sounds like the makings of a
job) it sounds like i'm giving away my time (searching for stuff) and my
money (in ads and the cost of the detector).

finders keepers. if there is a prominent sign or someone actively searching
for the item while i'm there then its a different story but i'm not going to
go hunt for the owner of everything i find.

as far as "if i dont take it someone else will"...thats right! i dont know
what fantasy world some of you are living in but i think a wake up call is
do!

its a nice mentallity to have but unfortunately its very realistic in todays
world.

may the flames begin!!
robert
miami

In article <37206A0F...@freenet.edmonton.ab.ca>,
Melanie Piper <mpi...@freenet.edmonton.ab.ca> wrote:
> shann...@hotmail.com wrote:
> >
> > Want to find GOLD rings, watches, jewelry,
> > money clips, and coins.
> >
> > Ordinarily you'd need a metal detector.
> > But...we're cheap here and we can dispense
> > with that.
> >
> > So, go to the park around the swingsets
> > and the merry-go-round. Kids and adults lose
> > their rings and coins into the sand around
> > these areas. You don't really need a metal
> > detector to find them. Instead just sift a
> > little sand and you'll find GOLD!
>
> Coins maybe, these days, but "my Momma taught me" that anything
> else you find is *not yours*. You don't need to know whose it
> is or whether they'll come back to look for it, you just need
> to know it's *not yours*. Otherwise it's stealing.
>
> What if the ring or whatever, however valuable or cheap, has
> great sentimental value to whoever lost it and they'll come
> back as soon as they can to look for it and ask around and put
> up posters et al???
>
> Yes, you can tell yourself that if you don't take it, someone
> else will. IMO, that doesn't change anything. You aren't
> responsible for what someone else might do, you are responsible
> for what *you* do.
>
> That said, I have gone "metal detecting" with my son a few
> times when he was younger and it can be a great "sport" and a
> neat thing to do with a kid. Anything just laying on top of
> the ground was "off limits" for us to take, but we found some
> really neat things buried under the surface. A few coins, an
> old chauffeurs badge, many things that we'd speculate about
> what they were and what they might have been used for.
>
> Here, the major newspaper lets people place "found" ads for
> free for pets. They do charge a bit for found things other
> than pets, but if they person really wants their item back,
> they'll usually pay for the ad, IME. A few times when a ring
> or something was just laying there, I've picked it up and
> placed an ad. Only once did anyone claim the ring, but they
> were *soooo* grateful...said it was a cheap ring but meant a
> lot to them.
>
> Melanie

dcat...@bellsouth.net

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
i think some of these folks are in a fantasy world here.....

you go buy a metal detector at a hundred or more dollars, you hit the parks
and beaches in search of treasure, you find treasure and then are supposed to
put up ads in local papers and posts at local boards about what you found?
NOT! unless i'm getting paid for this (which sounds like the makings of a
job) it sounds like i'm giving away my time (searching for stuff) and my
money (in ads and the cost of the detector).

finders keepers. if there is a prominent sign or someone actively searching
for the item while i'm there then its a different story but i'm not going to
go hunt for the owner of everything i find.

as far as "if i dont take it someone else will"...thats right! i dont know
what fantasy world some of you are living in but i think a wake up call is
do!

its a nice mentallity to have but unfortunately its not very realistic in

dcat...@bellsouth.net

unread,
Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
boy did you open up a can of worms! hey if you dont find it someone else will
so dont worry about the flames...

keep diggin'!
robert

In article <7fp60g$5m5$1...@nnrp1.dejanews.com>,


shann...@hotmail.com wrote:
> Want to find GOLD rings, watches, jewelry,
> money clips, and coins.
>
> Ordinarily you'd need a metal detector.
> But...we're cheap here and we can dispense
> with that.
>
> So, go to the park around the swingsets
> and the merry-go-round. Kids and adults lose
> their rings and coins into the sand around
> these areas. You don't really need a metal
> detector to find them. Instead just sift a
> little sand and you'll find GOLD!
>

> Start out by "tracking" around that merry
> go round. Get something to sift the sand.
> Maybe a handscoop and one of those plastic
> carry baskets like you see in virtually every
> grocery store. Or, use your kitty litter scoop.
> The kind that is oversize and with holes in it
> for the sand to flow out.
>
> Use your senses to tell you where and when to
> look. Try before 8 o'clock in the morning before
> all the people and kids show back up. Look in the
> sand for signs of ACTIVITY under the swingset. You
> can look and see which swing gets the use. Which
> ones are little used. Start scooping the sand into
> your basket and sifting for GOLD. I find more rings
> around the merry-go-round area.
>
> A cheap improvement to this method is a CHEAP metal
> detector. Ask your husband if he has a "stud detector".
> The one I have has 3 settings: one for studs, one for
> electric wires, and a setting for METAL. Take this
> cheapy metal detector with you to the park. You could
> tie it to a broom and run it over the sand. Or better
> yet, pass it over the sand which you have scooped into
> the basket. It should tell you if there's gold or coins
> in it.
>
> Sift a little sand and have some fun with it. I guarantee
> you will easily find a few rings each week --with just a
> bit of sifting. You'll also find a few dollars in change.
>
> I'd be interested to hear how others make out in their
> search for GOLD!

dcat...@bellsouth.net

unread,
Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
why not get some of those "sensor" lights and install spotlights on them aimed
at the turnaround area? light up their wee wee! another benefit is that folks
doing illegal things dont apreciate extra light.
robert
miami

In article <37247A20...@home.com>,

-----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------

dcat...@bellsouth.net

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
ok, lets get real here... i should not go treasure hunting because i will
find things that rightfully belong to others? ok, i should leave it behind to
be buried possibly forever or be unearthed by a land excavating machine when
the land gets developed. i suppose you walk right past change you see on the
floor because the owner may come back for it?

wake up and smell the burnt toast...hello!
robert


In article <3721AC34...@freenet.edmonton.ab.ca>,

-----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------

Mister fix

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
>wake up and smell the burnt toast...hello!
>robert

Robert, your toast may be burnt because you are using that old tube equipment!
You should try some of the newfangled transistor stuff.

This is not a flame, it is just an attempt at humor. I hope you take it that
way and I also hope that this thread dies soon.


You are only young once, but you can stay immature indefinitely.
- Ogden Nash

HMoldovan

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
In article <7g261c$mld$1...@nnrp1.dejanews.com>, dcat...@bellsouth.net writes:

>
>you go buy a metal detector at a hundred or more dollars, you hit the parks
>and beaches in search of treasure, you find treasure and then are supposed to
>put up ads in local papers and posts at local boards about what you found?
>NOT! unless i'm getting paid for this (which sounds like the makings of a
>job) it sounds like i'm giving away my time (searching for stuff) and my
>money (in ads and the cost of the detector).

Course ya spend couple hundred $$ to find ... what ... $4 in change?
I'll stick to the green stores for now. Better payoff - no upfront investment.
Hillary

Will DD for Chocolates

HMoldovan

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Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
In article <7frqag$fdt$1...@nnrp1.dejanews.com>, shann...@hotmail.com writes:

>
>Melanie informs us that finding jewelry in
>a public park is "stealing". Neither under
>the law nor under dictates of Christian nor
>Jewish law.
>

>But, Melanie, by ALL means, if you feel you
>should recover coins and jewelry which were
>lost in a public venue and then spend
>additional money (newspaper, phone calls,
>posting placards, etc) trying to find "the
>real owners", I applaud your misplaced sense
>of honesty!

I don't find her honesty misplaced at all! But then again - I like to be
honest in hopes that someone else will be honest with me. I once saw a lady
drop a $20 in WeBeToys, and I returned it to her. Sure, no one could 'trace'
that bill or what-have-you, but it was hers, it was the holiday season, and I
told my kids - just think how *you'd* feel if you lost something and no one
bothered?

shann...@hotmail.com

unread,
Apr 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/26/99
to
Of course, you're right.

This misplaced desire to both demonstrate
"you truly good I am" and to punish oneself
is, again, not found in Christianity, absent
in reason, and not founded at law.

Keep tracking GOLD and let me know what you find!

Lauri

unread,
Apr 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/27/99
to
On Mon, 26 Apr 1999 16:59:16 GMT, dcat...@bellsouth.net wrote:


>as far as "if i dont take it someone else will"...thats right! i dont know
>what fantasy world some of you are living in but i think a wake up call is
>do!

Just because other people will do something doesn't make it right.
I'm not living in a fantasy world at all; I live in a world where the
majority of people are honest and willing to go out of their way to do
good (but don't move here...it rains all the time. At least that's
what we tell the rest of the country).
>
>its a nice mentallity to have but unfortunately its very realistic in todays
>world.
A "nice mentality" means nothing unless there are actions to go with
it. It might be hard to understand until you lose something that is
meaningful to you.

One time several years ago near Christmas time, I was walking through
a department store and there, lying right in the middle of the aisle,
was a neatly folded $100 bill. I won't lie; my first thought was "Woo
hooo!!!!!! Lookit what I found!" But my next immediate thought
was......"What if this is someone's Christmas shopping money?".
I turned it in to the nearest clerk, who took my name and number in
case the money wasn't claimed. Of course, the woman who lost it
retraced her steps and was very suprised and relieved that the money
had not been taken. And yes, the clerk was also honest because she
gave the woman her money and my phone number.

Having said that, I don't beleive that using a metal detector to find
"treasures" is wrong. But I personally wouldn't feel right keeping
something like jewelry or anything else that might have real or
sentimental value to someone else without making some kind of effort
to find the owner first. All I have had to do on the few occaisions
that I've found something is to put myself in the shoes of the item's
owner, and then doing the right thing is easy. YMMV.

Lauri in WA
OBFrugal......I learned the hard way not to buy the kids expensive
jackets......my older son only had his a week before it was taken out
of his locker. Now they only wear jackets/sweatshirts that we can
afford to have stolen. :(


My real address is lauri AT crcwnet DOT com

linda-renee

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Apr 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/27/99
to
Lauri wrote:

> On Mon, 26 Apr 1999 16:59:16 GMT, dcat...@bellsouth.net wrote:

> >as far as "if i dont take it someone else will"...thats right! i dont know
> >what fantasy world some of you are living in but i think a wake up call is
> >do!

Too bad this person didn't stumble across an English grammar book. Much
more valuable than any pocket change left on the beach.

> Just because other people will do something doesn't make it right.
> I'm not living in a fantasy world at all; I live in a world where the
> majority of people are honest and willing to go out of their way to do
> good (but don't move here...it rains all the time. At least that's
> what we tell the rest of the country).

There will always be people to rationalize their dishonest behavior.
Interesting how those folks posting in here attempt to turn it around so
that the honest people have to justify their honesty.

> >its a nice mentallity to have but unfortunately its very realistic in todays
> >world.

> A "nice mentality" means nothing unless there are actions to go with
> it. It might be hard to understand until you lose something that is
> meaningful to you.

> All I have had to do on the few occaisions


> that I've found something is to put myself in the shoes of the item's
> owner, and then doing the right thing is easy. YMMV.

I guess for some people this is obvious, but for others....<sigh>

Bear

unread,
Apr 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/27/99
to
You guys might want to delete the "OTHER" newsgroup before you post! We seem
to get the pontificating dryer lint eater's sermons, ad nauseum......These
threads go on forever, no one ever has an original idea. They range so far
off topic and start flaming in just a few posts.This has nothing to do with
diving, NOTHING! If I dive diamond tiaras and winning lottery tickets, I'll
keep 'em and sleep nights! Same goes for babies and puppies.<so far just a
puppy>
linda-renee wrote in message <who cares!!!!!>
Dive Daily!
BBB<Bear>

Vesper Aschenbach

unread,
Apr 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/27/99
to
There's a big difference in finding a wallet (purse, identifiable item)
and just some loose valuable. I have on countless occasions found such
items, and returned them (or at least turned them in to the
authorities). Once I even found a class ring with a name in it and
(with permission) mailed it COD to the college.

As for other items, unidentifiable jewelry and the like, there's just no
way to find the owner (in most cases). So you're just gonna leave it
there? I don't think so!

Vesper


Callowayko

unread,
Apr 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/27/99
to
>Once I even found a class ring with a name in it and
>(with permission) mailed it COD to the college.
>

When my then-boyfriend, now husband was packing up his stuff to move I found a
class ring that wasn't his. I asked him where he got it. He said that while
he was in music school in the Army in Va he found it under a bed in a motel
room. This had been at least 10 years ago. Well, we held on to the ring for
about 2 years after that when I began searching for the owner. The ring had
his name inscribed inside and the name of the school was on the ring. I called
the school, they gave ME his tel#, I called, he talked to my husband and was
literally thrilled to find his lost class ring after so many years. I boxed it
up and my husband wrote the story of where all the ring had been over the past
years (Europe 2x, and all over USA). He sent us a real nice thank you note and
good feelings were had all around.

I promised myself that I wasn't going to get involved in this thread but here
goes: I have found lots and lots of stuff that had no discernable owner...I
kept it. I have also found stuff like wallets and purses (in dumpsters no
less) that I have turned over to the local police because there was no ID and
maybe, just maybe someone was looking for it. But if I find a gold chain in
the park, with no ID...I keep it. If I found a gold chain in a department
store, I would turn it in to the customer service desk. So, there is a lot of
grey area in this and it is hard to say what anyone would do under any given
circumstance...I am not condemning, criticizing or complaining....just my .02
:)

Jennifer


Callowayko

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Apr 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/27/99
to
>Too bad this person didn't stumble across an English grammar book. Much
>more valuable than any pocket change left on the beach.

Only to nitpicking posters.

Jennifer

Stay Wild

unread,
Apr 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/27/99
to
I am tired of this thread. I am not going to read it anymore. Bear is right.
It has nothing to do with dumpster diving. Would everyone just please quit
responding to it?

Sorry if I sound harsh, I just got back from having a root canal and I feel
like I've been slugged in the jaw.

If you have any comments to make please E-mail them to me because I will no
longer be reading this thread.

I apoligize for my loss of patience, but this thread needs to die.

As Always,
Stay Wild

tg

unread,
Apr 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/27/99
to
The dentist didn't happen to find any extra gold fillings in your
mouth that I could use, did he?

In article <19990427140322...@ng-ce1.aol.com>,

-----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------

Andrew Case

unread,
Apr 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/28/99
to
Lauri <la...@nospam--crcwnet.com> wrote:
>
>Having said that, I don't beleive that using a metal detector to find
>"treasures" is wrong. But I personally wouldn't feel right keeping
>something like jewelry or anything else that might have real or
>sentimental value to someone else without making some kind of effort
>to find the owner first. All I have had to do on the few occaisions

>that I've found something is to put myself in the shoes of the item's
>owner, and then doing the right thing is easy. YMMV.

If something's obviously been lost for a long time, the owner
has almost certainly given up on it, though if it's an item
of particular significance (e.g. wedding ring) making an effort
to check for an owner is certainly called for. If it's clearly
recently lost, then making an effort is certainly called for,
just out of basic principles of being a nice person. If being
a nice person isn't enough of an incentive, the metal detector
guy who started this subthread should consider the possibility
the 'find' has been reported stolen. It's unfortunate that some
folks need the threat of discomfort to make them do what's right,
but possesion of stolen property is a crime, and not all police
officers will buy the "I just found it lying there" line. Most
likely the cops would realize they couldn't pin it on him for
certain, but he might get a ride in a police car or closer
attention from the police in the future.

......Andrew
--
Andrew Case |
ac...@plasma.umd.edu |
Institute for Plasma Research |
University of Maryland, College Park |

BKenn156

unread,
Apr 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/28/99
to
Yesterday, I decided to de-flea the animals. It's spring and the season is
starting.

We use Bio-Spot, which is a topical liquid that gets applied to the skin.
We've used it for years, and it has always worked well.

I grabbed Bailey, my Maine Coon, and as I was applying the stuff, I looked
down, and had grabbed the wrong stuff, I had the dog stuff. Immediately, and I
mean right then, I threw him into the kitchen sink and began flooding the area
with water, used hand soap, and continued to flood it with water.

I called the vet, and told them what happened, and that I thought I'd gotten it
all off him. They said it should be okay.

This morning, I got up at 8 to go to my own doctor's appointment. Let the dogs
out, and back in, and looked in the living room, and there was Bailey having a
major seizure. I yelled for help and called the vet right away.

We got him there within an hour, and while he hadn't had another seizure, he
was showing major twitching in his head, ears and shoulders. The vet
immediately gave him atropine, which stopped most of the twitching and made him
more responsive to outside stimuli.

He has to stay there and have IV fluids and diazepam (valium?) and he may or
may not live. He is young, strong, and healthy, which is in his favor, but
he's a Maine Coon, which are noted for chemical sensitivity, which isn't good.

I love that cat a lot, he's my buddy. And knowing that I, through
carelessness, may have killed him, is a horrible feeling. I feel like the
worst human being that ever walked the earth right now, and all I can do is
warn everybody not to make this same mistake.

I want to warn everybody to READ THE LABEL before you start, when you take it
out of the package, when you snip the end off the tube, before you grab the
animal to apply the stuff. READ THE LABEL, I can't stress that enough.

And prayers, good wishes, healing energy for Bailey will be gratefully
accepted.

Helen


Smee

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Apr 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/28/99
to

I have Bailey in my thoughts. And you shouldn't beat yourself up too
bad. You made a mistake. This wasn't someting you did deliberately, it
was a mistake.

Smee

Bear

unread,
Apr 28, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/28/99
to
I'm praying for Bailey. Helen you made an honest mistake. It's good advice
to ALWAYS have the lights on, wear glasses<if you do>, and read the label
EVERYTIME. It doesn't matter if it's you, your kids, or your pets. Lots of
kids have gotten sick because some one mixed up dosages for elixirs and
drops on Tylenol. A flea comb might be a non-chemical option if your pet is
quite sensitive. Be careful with OTC "dhove" medications too and read
directions carefully. This ISN'T Off-Topic in MY OPINION!
Dive Daily!
BBB<Bear>

BKenn156 wrote in message <19990428191352...@ng-cg1.aol.com>...

BKenn156

unread,
Apr 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/29/99
to
Bailey is doing much better this morning. He's still unconscious from all the
phenobarb and valium they had to give him, but he's not seizing. Today they're
going to give him even more IV's to flush the drugs out of his system, and see
how he does. If he does okay, he should be able to come home tomorrow or
Saturday.

Guess I better get out there and dive him some baby food for a treat, huh?
Nah, I'm feeling expansive, I'll just go and BUY him some...

jrba...@fas.harvard.edu

unread,
Apr 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/29/99
to
In misc.consumers.frugal-living dcat...@bellsouth.net wrote:
: i think some of these folks are in a fantasy world here.....

: you go buy a metal detector at a hundred or more dollars, you hit the parks


: and beaches in search of treasure, you find treasure and then are supposed to
: put up ads in local papers and posts at local boards about what you found?
: NOT! unless i'm getting paid for this (which sounds like the makings of a
: job) it sounds like i'm giving away my time (searching for stuff) and my
: money (in ads and the cost of the detector).

: finders keepers. if there is a prominent sign or someone actively searching


: for the item while i'm there then its a different story but i'm not going to
: go hunt for the owner of everything i find.

: as far as "if i dont take it someone else will"...thats right! i dont know


: what fantasy world some of you are living in but i think a wake up call is
: do!

: its a nice mentallity to have but unfortunately its very realistic in todays
: world.

: may the flames begin!!
: robert
: miami

And the reason why is too many people like you...
By all means, don't buy the expensive metal detector and let the owners
find their own valuables.


jrba...@fas.harvard.edu

Callowayko

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Apr 29, 1999, 3:00:00 AM4/29/99
to
>Bailey is doing much better this morning.

I am sooo glad to hear this!!!!! I prayed quite a bit for the little guy!!
Keep your chin up!!

Jennifer

TKR

unread,
May 18, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/18/99
to
This sounds like a good idea to me.

Joan E. Smith (jes...@sfo.com) wrote:
: Lost property is not abandoned property. The procedure is to take it to the
: police, make a report. If no one claims it in 30 days, then it's yours.
...: Joan

Blessed be,
From Chicago


danielle...@aol.com

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Sep 21, 2012, 10:56:53 PM9/21/12
to
I like metal detecting very much and I always hope it can bring me some surprise and in fact the [url=http://www.detectorall.com/categories/Gold-Metal-Detectors/]gold metal detector[/url] really have create many surprise for me. Like finding some gold coins and gold rings. really interesting and I will keep go on. Just share my expeience with your guys.
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