Tomorrowland Never Dies - Vanity Fair

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Hatbox331

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Feb 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/14/00
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Thanks, I'm definitely going to pick that up.


Hatbox

DevinFlan

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Feb 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/14/00
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There is an interesting article with the above catchy title in the March 2000
issue of Vanity Fair (Madonna & Rupert Everett on cover).

It details how retro- and ironic visions of the future have replaced the
sincere, forward-thinking predictions of Walt and his ilk.

It is filled with references to and (small) pictures of Disneyland's
Tomorrowland, old and new. There is even an interview with a rabid Disneyland
enthusiast named Jason, who, if he doesn't dwell in this group, would certainly
feel at home here.

You may want to check it out,

Devin

Gwendolyn Ann Smith

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Feb 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/14/00
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In article <20000214131402...@ng-cu1.aol.com>, DevinFlan
<devi...@aol.com> wrote:

> There is even an interview with a rabid Disneyland
> enthusiast named Jason, who, if he doesn't dwell in this group, would
> certainly feel at home here.

Congrats Jason - ya made it into print. :-)

Cheers,
Gwen Smith

--
_
| )
|--|/------ Gwendolyn Ann Smith-Artist & Designer ---|
|--|--------------- gw...@gwensmith.com --------------|
|-/|.------ Listen to the Sounds of Disneyland ------|
|(-|-)- http://members.aol.com/gwensmith/dland.html -|
|-`|'----- AA1p0 CCWB0 aAR ED400 FY2 nk0 W21 M25 ----|
0 |
`v'

TulgeyWood

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Feb 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/14/00
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Why live for a vision of a better Tomorrow when you can reap bigger profits
today?

When did society lose its hope so much as to praise the efforts of bottom
liners as the ultimate skill? We are on track for Blade Runner after all.
It's our choice as a Nation.

Jon Nadelberg

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Feb 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/14/00
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Blame Jimmy Carter.

Gwendolyn Ann Smith

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Feb 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/14/00
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In article <MPG.131209a66ead25b98972c@news>, Jason <w...@thegrid.net>
wrote:

> Took them long enough to get the article written...I remember running
> into Tony Baxter and the reporter in April, 1998!

It happens that way, sometimes. There's interviews I did ages ago
that, to the best of my knowledge, have never made it to print or to
air.

Josh Scott and Torrie Wilson

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Feb 16, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/16/00
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Nap98 <na...@aol.com> wrote:

> Well here's my theory on this whole issue:
>
> I don't think society in general has lost it's hope for the future. I hear
> about it, see previews of it, and read about it almost every day.
>
> The vision of the future right now, seems to be a modern version of the
past.
> Denser cities, and reestablishment of extensive mass transit.
>
> Then there's also things we are only beginning to see now like electric
cars,
> "smart" houses, virtual reality home entertainment centers, and the growth
of
> the internet.
>
> There's always the frightening things too, like loss of privacy, over use
of
> technology, cloning, gentic engineering, enivironmental problems...and the
> costant effort to know more, and maybe know too much. I think more of us
are
> aware of those negative things then during Walt's time, we are more
cautious
> with our visions of the future.

Here's MY theory: Middle class and above is about 80% hopeful of the future
and what is to come. Although my family is doing OK, about lower middle
class, most people I go to school with or are friends with are barely making
it, and most aren't very hopeful. My bestfriend may be kicked out of his
house and he'll have to move across the Bay, where I would most likely never
see him again. Naw, I'm not very hopeful.

--
Josh Scott

They say my ghetto instrumental, is detrimental to kids,
as if they can't see the misery, in which they live...

-Tupac Shakur, "Krazy"

Trader_Chris

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Feb 18, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/18/00
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devi...@aol.com (DevinFlan) wrote:

>It details how retro- and ironic visions of the future have replaced the
>sincere, forward-thinking predictions of Walt and his ilk.

I love the look of the retro stuff, but we should expect more from
Disneyland. When they gave us the motherlode of googie design in 1955
it was the right thing at the right time. It helped inspire a
generation and added fuel to our sense of optimism for the future.

In 1998, Disney was in the position to do something similar for a new
generation. Instead, we got a lot of re-hash and a little eyewash. As
theme parks go, Tomorrowland 98 is good, but it falls far short of
being the cultural hot-spot Tomorrowland 55 was. God knows our vision
of the future could have used a big kick-start in the right direction.

Nick wrote:
>Denser cities, ...extensive mass transit... electric cars,... "smart" houses,
>virtual reality ...growth of the internet.

I'm not in the business of predicting the future, and neither was Walt
Disney. He and his employees gave us a grand vision to shoot for. Some
of it we realized and some of it we fell short of, but at least we had
a long-range goal stored in our collective subconscious --
Tomorrowland!

Now we have no greater vision. It's every man for himself and we only
plan until the end of the next fiscal year.

Some of the very companies that built the rockets that took us to the
moon and the missiles which defended us against the USSR are now
selling nuclear weapons technology to the Communist Chinese!

Big bright beautiful tomorrow INDEED!

>I think more of us are aware of those negative things then during Walt's
>time, we are more cautious with our visions of the future.

Yes. We are far to cautious with our dreams. It's like having a
brainstorming session with a rulebook -- It's all rather
counter-productive.

For more thoughts on the history of the future, I refer you to my
li'l' ol' website: http://home.fea.net/~cjepsen/Googie.htm

CJ


Trader_Chris

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Feb 22, 2000, 3:00:00 AM2/22/00
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On 18 Feb 2000 21:10:12 GMT, apsi...@aol.communism (mandelbrot)
wrote:

>Behold the power of capitalism...
>Behold the fruits of capitalism.

Capitalism was even less inhibited in 1955 -- So that's obviously not
the crucial factor here. Personally, I think the crucial factor is
personal responsibility. If individuals don't retain a sense of
personal responsibility and a sense of pride in their workmanship,
then NO economic or social system can function well.

CJ

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