A Mossad truck bomb that killed 242 US marines in 1983 Beirut

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Warhol

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Sep 11, 2009, 11:04:47 AM9/11/09
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A Mossad truck bomb that killed 242 marines in 1983 Beirut

The 1983 Bombing Of The Marine Barracks In Beirut.
http://judicial-inc.biz/Beirut_false_flag.htm

Revelations:

"The Jewish people as a whole will be its own Messiah. It will attain
world domination by the dissolution of other races...and by the
establishment of a world republic in which everywhere the Jews will
exercise the privilege of citizenship. In this New World Order the
Children of Israel...will furnish all the leaders without encountering
opposition..." (Karl Marx in a letter to Baruch Levy, quoted in Review
de Paris, June 1, 1928, p. 574)

Pentagon Analyst Dr. Beter's:

November 3, 1982 "...I reported that the Marines had been sent there
to become the focus of a major incident. The Mossad is to arrange for
a number of our Marines to be killed in an incident that will be
blamed on the Arabs! This will be used to inflame American public
opinion to help lead us into war, including ultimately nuclear war."

mirjam

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Sep 11, 2009, 11:41:19 AM9/11/09
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Suicide bomber killed 241 American troops 25 years ago in barracks
October 23, 2008

In the green expanse of Arlington National Cemetery's Section 59, a
Lebanese cedar tree grows near the final resting place of some of the
first Americans to shed blood in the fight against Middle East
terrorism.

Former Navy journalist Joe Ciokon of Poway was sleeping next door to
the Marine barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, that were hit by a suicide
bomber 25 years ago today. After scrambling to locate survivors, he
was ordered to take up his camera and record the scene.

Twenty-five years ago today, a suicide bomber steered a truck loaded
with the equivalent of six tons of TNT down the airport road in
Beirut, Lebanon. He plowed into the four-story barracks where more
than 300 U.S. troops from a U.N. peacekeeping mission slept and
detonated what the FBI called the largest non-nuclear bomb in
history.

The explosion and fireball pulverized the concrete fortress, killing
241 U.S. service members, most of them Marines. A second blast minutes
later at the compound of the French peacekeeping force killed 58 more
Western troops. Three months later, President Ronald Reagan pulled the
Americans out of Beirut.

A quarter-century and two wars with Iraq have dulled the public's
memory of the Beirut attack. But the United States and its allies
still feel the effects, said retired Marine Col. Tim Geraghty, who
commanded U.S. forces in Lebanon at the time.

A splinter group of the Iranian-and Syrian-supported Hezbollah
organization carried out the attack, which allegedly was planned by a
man who later inspired Osama bin Laden. Then a tiny guerrilla outfit,
Hezbollah has grown into a political and military force in Lebanon.

Most of the 1,500-man Marine expeditionary force was bunked in a four-
story concrete building.

241 died: 220 Marine Corps, 18 Navy, three Army.

It was the largest single-day loss of life for Marines since the World
War II Battle of Iwo Jima.

A nearly simultaneous explosion nearby killed 58 French soldiers.

One of two alleged plotters, Imad Mugniyah, was killed by a car bomb
in Syria on February 12, 2008.

Geraghty sees a line from the Beirut bombing through the al-Qaeda
terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 – and ultimately to the U.S.
war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried in
Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
Beirut.

“Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
essentially the same crowd?” said Geraghty, who lives in Phoenix. “The
enemy learned: Terrorism works.”

Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief at the
time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked alongside
the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of the tiny
television and radio detachment.

It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in death and
failure.

“We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and then we
just leave,” Ciokon said. “Why did we give these lives?”

The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a fragile
peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since the
Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from Jordan,
took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian and
Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as Iran, Syria
and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a no-man's
land of urban warfare.

Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange for an
Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made up of
troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.

U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
difficult to defend because the airport remained open for business and
because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.

“It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
reasons,” Geraghty said. “I was uneasy from Day One that we were in
that position.”

He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine Amphibious
Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete building
that had once been the PLO headquarters.

The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view the
United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led forces of
the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy in
April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.

“We walked into the middle of a family feud,” Ciokon said, “and they
all turned their guns on us.”

Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the barracks
bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took potshots
at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his requests for
stronger defenses.

On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment from
tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the Marine
Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to the
roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias lobbed
shells at one another.

“It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,” Ciokon recalled. “I
was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back to my
room.”

Ciokon slept soundly – until the blast catapulted him out of his cot
at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.

“I did a complete cartwheel,” he said. “In midair, I grabbed my helmet
and my flak jacket.”

At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his building. He
raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.

“It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building,” Ciokon
said. “I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me around,
covered in dust, like zombies.”

Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
building.

Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize his
broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They traded
their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.

Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.

“You learn to live with it,” Ciokon said. “It never gets easier.”

The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war raged
for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in control
of the country.

Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin bombings
and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847 and a
series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed to have
met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a car
bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
responsibility.

Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut veterans
for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument listing the
names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.

“The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the years,”
Geraghty said. “Every day I pray for them. Every day.”


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


A student from Mt. Vernon High School's Junior Reserve Officer
Training Corps
in Alexandria, Virginia, salutes a grave where one of the Marines
killed in Beirut,
Lebanon in 1983 was laid to rest. Twenty-one out of 220 Marines killed
were buried in
Arlington National Cemetery. A memorial stone marking the gravesite
sits alongside a Lebanese cedar
symbolizing the nation in which they died.
by Sgt. Melvin Lopez Jr.
Henderson Hall News

A remembrance ceremony was held at the Arlington National Cemetery
Saturday to remember the Marines who were victimized by a gruesome
terrorist attack 21 years ago.

On October 23, 1983 at 6:22 a.m., a large delivery truck drove to the
Beirut International Airport where the Marine Barracks was located.

After turning onto an access road leading to the compound, the driver
rushed through a barbed-wire fence, passed between two sentry posts,
crashed through the gate, and slammed into the lobby of the barracks.

The driver detonated explosives with the power equal to more than
12,000 pounds of TNT. The explosion crumbled the four-story building,
crushing service members to death while they were sleeping.

The terrorist attack killed 220 Marines and 21 other U.S. service
members who were stationed there to help keep the peace in a nation
torn by war.

It was the bloodiest day in the Corps' history since World War II,
when Marines fought to secure Iwo Jima.

On the 21st anniversary of the bombing, the ceremony began with words
from the Master of Ceremonies, retired U.S. Navy captain, Capt.
William Perry. He explained how one comrade expressed what it was like
to lose a friend.

"The whole idea of knowing that this person gave his life for
something he truly believed in," said Perry, reiterating words spoken
by 1st Sgt. James Richard, "how the flood of memories of that person
burned into your mind, is lost in people who have never experienced
it."

Following the captain's opening statements were commentary from
several speakers including the 29th Commandant of the Marine Corps,
retired General A. M. Gray.

During the somber ceremony, they spoke about the Marines who went to
Beirut on a peacekeeping mission, and that their actions should not be
forgotten.

"That is why we're here today," said Carmella LaSpada, director, White
House Commission on Remembrance, "and why we'll be here next year, and
each year after that."

Gray repeats the words spoken to him by former U.S. President Ronald
Reagan at a funeral service at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North
Carolina, following the bombing.

"Our former warriors have now joined a long line of Soldiers of the
Sea who have given their lives in the service of a grateful nation,"
said Reagan.

"They had one simple mission," said Gray. "They came (to Lebanon) in
peace, and they wanted to provide an opportunity for people to live in
peace.

Afterward, students from Mt. Vernon High School's Marine Corps Junior
Reserve Officer Training Corps in Alexandria, Va., marched onto the
gravesite where 21 out of the 220 Marines killed were laid to rest.
They placed a rose on each gravestone and immediately thereafter,
saluted to show respect for those who gave their lives.

A wreath-laying proceeded in which a Marine lance corporal, in his
dress blue uniform, marched slowly to a memorial stone marking the
spot of the site. He placed the wreath alongside the stone and a
Lebanese cedar, symbolizing the nation where the Marines died.

"We pledge that we would never forget their memories, their
sacrifice," said Gray.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fallen service members remembered on 20th anniversary of Beirut blast
'Their loss is not in vain'
Thursday, October 23, 2003

ARLINGTON, Virginia - Under cloudy and chilly skies, diplomats,
Marines and some family members who lost loved ones to terrorism
gathered at Arlington National Cemetery Thursday to remember service
members killed in the October 23, 1983, blast at the Marine barracks
in Beirut, Lebanon.

The somber ceremony, coming on the 20th anniversary of that horrific
truck bombing, took place in an area of the cemetery where 21 of the
241 U.S. service members killed by the blast are buried. A memorial
stone marks the spot, along with a tree, a Lebanese cedar.

"Their loss is not in vain," said Marine Lieutenant General Jan C.
Huly. "And we will not break faith with them in the tasks we have
ahead."

The bombing of the Marine barracks was, as one speaker describe it, a
"watershed" moment for this country, bringing home the horrors of
terrorism. The blast was preceded six months earlier by a deadly
bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Beirut.

The U.S. military eventually withdrew from Lebanon, where it and
France had gone to help bring peace to a country torn by civil war. A
separate blast on the French compound in Beirut on October 23, 1983,
killed 58 French service members.

Relations between the United States and France have been strained by
differences the two countries had over the war in Iraq. But the
defense attache to the French Embassy in the United States, in his
comments Wednesday, made a point of stressing the two countries'
"enduring relation and common objective."

"In this dangerous world, America and France must stand together,"
said Gen. Pascal Vinchon.

Several speakers drew parallels to the between the 1983 blast and the
September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

"We did not know they would be the first casualties -- among the first
-- in the war on terrorism," Huly said of the service members killed
in 1983.

No one has ever been held accountable for the 1983 blasts.

David Satterfield, the deputy assistant secretary for Near Eastern
affairs at the U.S. State Department, said efforts to find the
culprits "will not cease."

The tribute, an annual event, was organized by the White House
Commission on Remembrance. The tribute was the brainchild of No
Greater Love, an organization dedicated to remembering service members
who have died in war or acts of terrorism.

Alexander

unread,
Sep 11, 2009, 1:30:53 PM9/11/09
to

Why are you reminding us of our terrible losses in you stinking war?
Its a family fight and I think we should stand back and furnish both
sides with the weapons of their own destruction. Not one more American
life for you damned ZionNazi's and not one more American dollar from our
very broke country! A war crimes tribunal is in order for Israel with
lots of hangings. I do so hope Obama has the intestinal fortitude to
shut down those Settlements by peaceful or bloody means. Maybe its time
for you to go back to Russia. Oh, thats right. Russia doesn't like you
people either. They know that you would sell them out in a heartbeat.
Like Jonathon Pollard and others have done to America.

> terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 � and ultimately to the U.S.


> war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried in
> Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
> Beirut.
>

> �Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
> essentially the same crowd?� said Geraghty, who lives in Phoenix. �The
> enemy learned: Terrorism works.�


>
> Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief at the
> time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked alongside
> the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of the tiny
> television and radio detachment.
>
> It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in death and
> failure.
>

> �We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and then we
> just leave,� Ciokon said. �Why did we give these lives?�


>
> The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a fragile
> peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since the
> Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from Jordan,
> took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian and
> Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as Iran, Syria
> and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a no-man's
> land of urban warfare.
>
> Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange for an
> Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made up of
> troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.
>
> U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
> difficult to defend because the airport remained open for business and
> because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.
>

> �It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
> reasons,� Geraghty said. �I was uneasy from Day One that we were in
> that position.�


>
> He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine Amphibious
> Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete building
> that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>
> The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view the
> United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led forces of
> the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy in
> April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>

> �We walked into the middle of a family feud,� Ciokon said, �and they
> all turned their guns on us.�


>
> Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the barracks
> bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took potshots
> at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his requests for
> stronger defenses.
>
> On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment from
> tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the Marine
> Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to the
> roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias lobbed
> shells at one another.
>

> �It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,� Ciokon recalled. �I


> was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back to my

> room.�
>
> Ciokon slept soundly � until the blast catapulted him out of his cot


> at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>

> �I did a complete cartwheel,� he said. �In midair, I grabbed my helmet
> and my flak jacket.�


>
> At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his building. He
> raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
> barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>

> �It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building,� Ciokon
> said. �I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me around,
> covered in dust, like zombies.�


>
> Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
> building.
>
> Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize his
> broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They traded
> their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>
> Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>

> �You learn to live with it,� Ciokon said. �It never gets easier.�


>
> The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war raged
> for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in control
> of the country.
>
> Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin bombings
> and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847 and a
> series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed to have
> met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a car
> bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
> responsibility.
>
> Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut veterans
> for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument listing the
> names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>

> �The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the years,�
> Geraghty said. �Every day I pray for them. Every day.�

Nightcrawler

unread,
Sep 11, 2009, 2:04:09 PM9/11/09
to
Right. I've worked with people that came from Beirut. They
wish the U.S. would have bombed the MSS back into their
holes. Instead the diplomatic approach, such as you suggest,
was tried. Guess who won?

"Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message
news:7gvfqdF...@mid.individual.net...

Bent Attorney Esq.

unread,
Sep 11, 2009, 4:40:16 PM9/11/09
to
On Sep 11, 2:04 pm, "Nightcrawler" <Dirtyde...@dirtcheap.net> wrote:
> Right.  I've worked with people that came from Beirut.  They
> wish the U.S. would have bombed the MSS back into their
> holes.  Instead the diplomatic approach, such as you suggest,
> was tried.  Guess who won?
>
> "Alexander" <Alexan...@thegreat.org> wrote in message

>
> news:7gvfqdF...@mid.individual.net...
>
>
>
>
>
> > Why are you reminding us of our terrible losses in you stinking war?
> > Its a family fight and I think we should stand back and furnish both sides with the
> > weapons of their own destruction. Not one more American life for you damned ZionNazi's
> > and not one more American dollar from our very broke country! A war crimes tribunal is
> > in order for Israel with lots of hangings. I do so hope Obama has the intestinal
> > fortitude to shut down those Settlements by peaceful or bloody means. Maybe its time for
> > you to go back to Russia. Oh, thats right. Russia doesn't like you
> > people either. They know that you would sell them out in a heartbeat. Like Jonathon
> > Pollard and others have done to America.

Today I purchased Paprika grown and processed in Lebanon. I used to
purchase only Hungarian Paprika but was interested in what this stuff
would taste like. btw, anyone have any experience with Lebanese
Paprika?

cornholio

unread,
Sep 11, 2009, 5:20:56 PM9/11/09
to
Muslimes and the truth rarely meet.

Nightcrawler

unread,
Sep 11, 2009, 5:36:49 PM9/11/09
to
That's an understatement.

"cornholio" <andx...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:b19c0f07-ed70-426f...@o41g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...

Alex

unread,
Sep 11, 2009, 7:39:42 PM9/11/09
to
> > terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 - and ultimately to the U.S.

> > war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried in
> > Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
> > Beirut.
>
> > "Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
> > essentially the same crowd?" said Geraghty, who lives in Phoenix. "The
> > enemy learned: Terrorism works."
>

> > Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief at the
> > time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked alongside
> > the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of the tiny
> > television and radio detachment.
>
> > It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in death and
> > failure.
>
> > "We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and then we
> > just leave," Ciokon said. "Why did we give these lives?"

>
> > The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a fragile
> > peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since the
> > Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from Jordan,
> > took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian and
> > Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as Iran, Syria
> > and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a no-man's
> > land of urban warfare.
>
> > Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange for an
> > Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made up of
> > troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.
>
> > U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
> > difficult to defend because the airport remained open for business and
> > because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.
>
> > "It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
> > reasons," Geraghty said. "I was uneasy from Day One that we were in
> > that position."
>

> > He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine Amphibious
> > Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete building
> > that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>
> > The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view the
> > United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led forces of
> > the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy in
> > April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>
> > "We walked into the middle of a family feud," Ciokon said, "and they

> > all turned their guns on us."
>
> > Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the barracks
> > bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took potshots
> > at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his requests for
> > stronger defenses.
>
> > On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment from
> > tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the Marine
> > Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to the
> > roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias lobbed
> > shells at one another.
>
> > "It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing," Ciokon recalled. "I

> > was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back to my
> > room."
>
> > Ciokon slept soundly - until the blast catapulted him out of his cot

> > at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>
> > "I did a complete cartwheel," he said. "In midair, I grabbed my helmet
> > and my flak jacket."
>

> > At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his building. He
> > raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
> > barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>
> > "It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building," Ciokon
> > said. "I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me around,

> > covered in dust, like zombies."
>
> > Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
> > building.
>
> > Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize his
> > broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They traded
> > their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>
> > Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>
> > "You learn to live with it," Ciokon said. "It never gets easier."
>
> > The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war raged
> > for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in control
> > of the country.
>
> > Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin bombings
> > and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847 and a
> > series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed to have
> > met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a car
> > bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
> > responsibility.
>
> > Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut veterans
> > for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument listing the
> > names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>
> > "The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the years,"
> > Geraghty said. "Every day I pray for them. Every day."
>
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> ...
>
> продолжение >>- Скрыть цитируемый текст -
>
> - Показать цитируемый текст -


russians got in last century their bloody exercise in rossia (russian
means nationality, rossia means country, there are two distinctive
words and meanings in russian language, unlike in english there is
only one word for both terms and it's wrong and confuse unaware
public). we have their mafia in kremlin since 1917 and do not need
more from your side. "russian" revolution was in fact jewish
revolution in rossia, the first color "red"one in 20th sentury, later
followed by "orange" in Ukraine, "rosy" Georgia etc.

Stewart

unread,
Sep 12, 2009, 6:14:28 PM9/12/09
to

"Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message
news:7gvfqdF...@mid.individual.net...
>
>

> Why are you reminding us of our terrible losses in you stinking war?
> Its a family fight and I think we should stand back and furnish both
> sides with the weapons of their own destruction. Not one more
> American life for you damned ZionNazi's and not one more American
> dollar from our very broke country! A war crimes tribunal is in
> order for Israel with lots of hangings. I do so hope Obama has the
> intestinal fortitude to shut down those Settlements by peaceful or
> bloody means. Maybe its time for you to go back to Russia. Oh, thats
> right. Russia doesn't like you
> people either. They know that you would sell them out in a
> heartbeat. Like Jonathon Pollard and others have done to America.
>

You will furnish what we call for and like it.

>> terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 � and ultimately to the

>> U.S.
>> war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried in
>> Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
>> Beirut.
>>

>> �Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
>> essentially the same crowd?� said Geraghty, who lives in Phoenix.
>> �The
>> enemy learned: Terrorism works.�


>>
>> Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief at
>> the
>> time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked
>> alongside
>> the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of the
>> tiny
>> television and radio detachment.
>>
>> It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in death
>> and
>> failure.
>>

>> �We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and then
>> we
>> just leave,� Ciokon said. �Why did we give these lives?�


>>
>> The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a fragile
>> peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since the
>> Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from
>> Jordan,
>> took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian and
>> Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as Iran,
>> Syria
>> and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a
>> no-man's
>> land of urban warfare.
>>
>> Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange for an
>> Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made up
>> of
>> troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.
>>
>> U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
>> difficult to defend because the airport remained open for business
>> and
>> because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.
>>

>> �It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
>> reasons,� Geraghty said. �I was uneasy from Day One that we were in
>> that position.�


>>
>> He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine Amphibious
>> Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete
>> building
>> that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>>
>> The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view the
>> United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led forces
>> of
>> the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy in
>> April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>>

>> �We walked into the middle of a family feud,� Ciokon said, �and
>> they
>> all turned their guns on us.�


>>
>> Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the barracks
>> bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took
>> potshots
>> at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his requests
>> for
>> stronger defenses.
>>
>> On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment from
>> tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the Marine
>> Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to the
>> roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias
>> lobbed
>> shells at one another.
>>

>> �It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,� Ciokon recalled.
>> �I


>> was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back to my

>> room.�
>>
>> Ciokon slept soundly � until the blast catapulted him out of his

>> cot
>> at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>>

>> �I did a complete cartwheel,� he said. �In midair, I grabbed my
>> helmet
>> and my flak jacket.�


>>
>> At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his building.
>> He
>> raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
>> barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>>

>> �It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building,�
>> Ciokon
>> said. �I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me around,
>> covered in dust, like zombies.�


>>
>> Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
>> building.
>>
>> Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize his
>> broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They
>> traded
>> their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>>
>> Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>>

>> �You learn to live with it,� Ciokon said. �It never gets easier.�


>>
>> The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war raged
>> for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in
>> control
>> of the country.
>>
>> Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin
>> bombings
>> and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847 and
>> a
>> series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed to
>> have
>> met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a car
>> bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
>> responsibility.
>>
>> Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut
>> veterans
>> for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument listing
>> the
>> names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>>

>> �The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the years,�
>> Geraghty said. �Every day I pray for them. Every day.�

Alexander

unread,
Sep 12, 2009, 10:11:37 PM9/12/09
to
Nightcrawler wrote:
> Right. I've worked with people that came from Beirut. They
> wish the U.S. would have bombed the MSS back into their
> holes. Instead the diplomatic approach, such as you suggest,
> was tried. Guess who won?
>
> "Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message
> news:7gvfqdF...@mid.individual.net...


When we were in Beirut as US Marines the fucking Jews were snipering us
in yet another false flag operation to entice us to attack their
enemies. We sent our dead home and sent those bastards home in body
bags. We were told to cease and desist because it was damaging politics
for us to shoot back. Soo, Sunschine don't be blowing smoke hare. I
suggest that instead of shooting your shithole off, you spend some time
in country.

Alexander

unread,
Sep 12, 2009, 10:17:17 PM9/12/09
to
Stewart wrote:
> "Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message
> news:7gvfqdF...@mid.individual.net...
>>
>> Why are you reminding us of our terrible losses in you stinking war?
>> Its a family fight and I think we should stand back and furnish both
>> sides with the weapons of their own destruction. Not one more
>> American life for you damned ZionNazi's and not one more American
>> dollar from our very broke country! A war crimes tribunal is in
>> order for Israel with lots of hangings. I do so hope Obama has the
>> intestinal fortitude to shut down those Settlements by peaceful or
>> bloody means. Maybe its time for you to go back to Russia. Oh, thats
>> right. Russia doesn't like you
>> people either. They know that you would sell them out in a
>> heartbeat. Like Jonathon Pollard and others have done to America.
>>
>
> You will furnish what we call for and like it.

We furnished that bed you are hiding under and the phone line that you
threaten others with. Are you still afraid to go out after dark?

>>> terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 � and ultimately to the

>>> U.S.
>>> war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried in
>>> Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
>>> Beirut.
>>>

>>> �Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
>>> essentially the same crowd?� said Geraghty, who lives in Phoenix.
>>> �The
>>> enemy learned: Terrorism works.�
>>>

>>> Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief at
>>> the
>>> time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked
>>> alongside
>>> the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of the
>>> tiny
>>> television and radio detachment.
>>>
>>> It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in death
>>> and
>>> failure.
>>>

>>> �We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and then
>>> we
>>> just leave,� Ciokon said. �Why did we give these lives?�


>>>
>>> The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a fragile
>>> peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since the
>>> Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from
>>> Jordan,
>>> took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian and
>>> Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as Iran,
>>> Syria
>>> and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a
>>> no-man's
>>> land of urban warfare.
>>>
>>> Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange for an
>>> Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made up
>>> of
>>> troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.
>>>
>>> U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
>>> difficult to defend because the airport remained open for business
>>> and
>>> because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.
>>>

>>> �It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
>>> reasons,� Geraghty said. �I was uneasy from Day One that we were in
>>> that position.�


>>>
>>> He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine Amphibious
>>> Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete
>>> building
>>> that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>>>
>>> The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view the
>>> United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led forces
>>> of
>>> the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy in
>>> April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>>>

>>> �We walked into the middle of a family feud,� Ciokon said, �and
>>> they
>>> all turned their guns on us.�


>>>
>>> Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the barracks
>>> bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took
>>> potshots
>>> at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his requests
>>> for
>>> stronger defenses.
>>>
>>> On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment from
>>> tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the Marine
>>> Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to the
>>> roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias
>>> lobbed
>>> shells at one another.
>>>

>>> �It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,� Ciokon recalled.
>>> �I


>>> was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back to my

>>> room.�
>>>
>>> Ciokon slept soundly � until the blast catapulted him out of his

>>> cot
>>> at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>>>

>>> �I did a complete cartwheel,� he said. �In midair, I grabbed my
>>> helmet
>>> and my flak jacket.�


>>>
>>> At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his building.
>>> He
>>> raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
>>> barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>>>

>>> �It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building,�
>>> Ciokon
>>> said. �I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me around,
>>> covered in dust, like zombies.�


>>>
>>> Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
>>> building.
>>>
>>> Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize his
>>> broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They
>>> traded
>>> their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>>>
>>> Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>>>

>>> �You learn to live with it,� Ciokon said. �It never gets easier.�
>>>

>>> The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war raged
>>> for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in
>>> control
>>> of the country.
>>>
>>> Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin
>>> bombings
>>> and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847 and
>>> a
>>> series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed to
>>> have
>>> met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a car
>>> bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
>>> responsibility.
>>>
>>> Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut
>>> veterans
>>> for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument listing
>>> the
>>> names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>>>

>>> �The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the years,�
>>> Geraghty said. �Every day I pray for them. Every day.�

Jewdas

unread,
Sep 12, 2009, 10:18:38 PM9/12/09
to
cornholio wrote:
> Muslimes and the truth rarely meet.

Let me correct that

Jews and Truth *NEVER* meet.

American Eagle

unread,
Sep 12, 2009, 10:19:53 PM9/12/09
to

Your family sounds wonderful. Here is hoping that you half brothers
destroy each other and soon.

>
>

Stewart

unread,
Sep 13, 2009, 12:09:25 AM9/13/09
to

"Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message
news:7h331bF...@mid.individual.net...

> Stewart wrote:
>> "Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message
>> news:7gvfqdF...@mid.individual.net...
>>>
>>> Why are you reminding us of our terrible losses in you stinking
>>> war?
>>> Its a family fight and I think we should stand back and furnish
>>> both sides with the weapons of their own destruction. Not one more
>>> American life for you damned ZionNazi's and not one more American
>>> dollar from our very broke country! A war crimes tribunal is in
>>> order for Israel with lots of hangings. I do so hope Obama has the
>>> intestinal fortitude to shut down those Settlements by peaceful or
>>> bloody means. Maybe its time for you to go back to Russia. Oh,
>>> thats right. Russia doesn't like you
>>> people either. They know that you would sell them out in a
>>> heartbeat. Like Jonathon Pollard and others have done to America.
>>>
>>
>> You will furnish what we call for and like it.
>
> We furnished that bed you are hiding under and the phone line that
> you
> threaten others with. Are you still afraid to go out after dark?
>>

Hahaha...why would anyone be afraid of a pussy like you? Fucking
dickwad.

>>>> terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 � and ultimately to the

>>>> U.S.
>>>> war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried
>>>> in
>>>> Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
>>>> Beirut.
>>>>

>>>> �Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
>>>> essentially the same crowd?� said Geraghty, who lives in Phoenix.
>>>> �The
>>>> enemy learned: Terrorism works.�
>>>>

>>>> Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief
>>>> at the
>>>> time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked
>>>> alongside
>>>> the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of the
>>>> tiny
>>>> television and radio detachment.
>>>>
>>>> It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in death
>>>> and
>>>> failure.
>>>>

>>>> �We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and
>>>> then we
>>>> just leave,� Ciokon said. �Why did we give these lives?�


>>>>
>>>> The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a
>>>> fragile
>>>> peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since
>>>> the
>>>> Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from
>>>> Jordan,
>>>> took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian
>>>> and
>>>> Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as Iran,
>>>> Syria
>>>> and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a
>>>> no-man's
>>>> land of urban warfare.
>>>>
>>>> Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange for
>>>> an
>>>> Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made up
>>>> of
>>>> troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.
>>>>
>>>> U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
>>>> difficult to defend because the airport remained open for
>>>> business and
>>>> because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.
>>>>

>>>> �It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
>>>> reasons,� Geraghty said. �I was uneasy from Day One that we were
>>>> in
>>>> that position.�


>>>>
>>>> He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine
>>>> Amphibious
>>>> Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete
>>>> building
>>>> that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>>>>
>>>> The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view
>>>> the
>>>> United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led forces
>>>> of
>>>> the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy in
>>>> April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>>>>

>>>> �We walked into the middle of a family feud,� Ciokon said, �and
>>>> they
>>>> all turned their guns on us.�


>>>>
>>>> Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the barracks
>>>> bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took
>>>> potshots
>>>> at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his requests
>>>> for
>>>> stronger defenses.
>>>>
>>>> On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment
>>>> from
>>>> tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the Marine
>>>> Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to
>>>> the
>>>> roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias
>>>> lobbed
>>>> shells at one another.
>>>>

>>>> �It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,� Ciokon
>>>> recalled. �I


>>>> was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back to
>>>> my

>>>> room.�
>>>>
>>>> Ciokon slept soundly � until the blast catapulted him out of his

>>>> cot
>>>> at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>>>>

>>>> �I did a complete cartwheel,� he said. �In midair, I grabbed my
>>>> helmet
>>>> and my flak jacket.�


>>>>
>>>> At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his
>>>> building. He
>>>> raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
>>>> barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>>>>

>>>> �It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building,�
>>>> Ciokon
>>>> said. �I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me
>>>> around,
>>>> covered in dust, like zombies.�


>>>>
>>>> Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
>>>> building.
>>>>
>>>> Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize
>>>> his
>>>> broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They
>>>> traded
>>>> their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>>>>
>>>> Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>>>>

>>>> �You learn to live with it,� Ciokon said. �It never gets easier.�
>>>>

>>>> The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war
>>>> raged
>>>> for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in
>>>> control
>>>> of the country.
>>>>
>>>> Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin
>>>> bombings
>>>> and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847
>>>> and a
>>>> series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed to
>>>> have
>>>> met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a car
>>>> bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
>>>> responsibility.
>>>>
>>>> Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut
>>>> veterans
>>>> for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument listing
>>>> the
>>>> names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>>>>

>>>> �The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the
>>>> years,�
>>>> Geraghty said. �Every day I pray for them. Every day.�

Alexander

unread,
Sep 13, 2009, 2:33:39 AM9/13/09
to
Stewart wrote:
> "Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message
> news:7h331bF...@mid.individual.net...
>> Stewart wrote:
>>> "Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message
>>> news:7gvfqdF...@mid.individual.net...
>>>> Why are you reminding us of our terrible losses in you stinking
>>>> war?
>>>> Its a family fight and I think we should stand back and furnish
>>>> both sides with the weapons of their own destruction. Not one more
>>>> American life for you damned ZionNazi's and not one more American
>>>> dollar from our very broke country! A war crimes tribunal is in
>>>> order for Israel with lots of hangings. I do so hope Obama has the
>>>> intestinal fortitude to shut down those Settlements by peaceful or
>>>> bloody means. Maybe its time for you to go back to Russia. Oh,
>>>> thats right. Russia doesn't like you
>>>> people either. They know that you would sell them out in a
>>>> heartbeat. Like Jonathon Pollard and others have done to America.
>>>>
>>> You will furnish what we call for and like it.
>> We furnished that bed you are hiding under and the phone line that
>> you
>> threaten others with. Are you still afraid to go out after dark?
>
> Hahaha...why would anyone be afraid of a pussy like you? Fucking
> dickwad.


Thats cute.. Yelling threats from behind your mommies skirts.

>>>>> terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 � and ultimately to the

>>>>> U.S.
>>>>> war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried
>>>>> in
>>>>> Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
>>>>> Beirut.
>>>>>

>>>>> �Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
>>>>> essentially the same crowd?� said Geraghty, who lives in Phoenix.
>>>>> �The
>>>>> enemy learned: Terrorism works.�
>>>>>

>>>>> Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief
>>>>> at the
>>>>> time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked
>>>>> alongside
>>>>> the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of the
>>>>> tiny
>>>>> television and radio detachment.
>>>>>
>>>>> It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in death
>>>>> and
>>>>> failure.
>>>>>

>>>>> �We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and
>>>>> then we
>>>>> just leave,� Ciokon said. �Why did we give these lives?�


>>>>>
>>>>> The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a
>>>>> fragile
>>>>> peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since
>>>>> the
>>>>> Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from
>>>>> Jordan,
>>>>> took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian
>>>>> and
>>>>> Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as Iran,
>>>>> Syria
>>>>> and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a
>>>>> no-man's
>>>>> land of urban warfare.
>>>>>
>>>>> Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange for
>>>>> an
>>>>> Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made up
>>>>> of
>>>>> troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.
>>>>>
>>>>> U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
>>>>> difficult to defend because the airport remained open for
>>>>> business and
>>>>> because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.
>>>>>

>>>>> �It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
>>>>> reasons,� Geraghty said. �I was uneasy from Day One that we were
>>>>> in
>>>>> that position.�


>>>>>
>>>>> He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine
>>>>> Amphibious
>>>>> Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete
>>>>> building
>>>>> that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>>>>>
>>>>> The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view
>>>>> the
>>>>> United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led forces
>>>>> of
>>>>> the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy in
>>>>> April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>>>>>

>>>>> �We walked into the middle of a family feud,� Ciokon said, �and
>>>>> they
>>>>> all turned their guns on us.�


>>>>>
>>>>> Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the barracks
>>>>> bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took
>>>>> potshots
>>>>> at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his requests
>>>>> for
>>>>> stronger defenses.
>>>>>
>>>>> On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment
>>>>> from
>>>>> tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the Marine
>>>>> Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to
>>>>> the
>>>>> roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias
>>>>> lobbed
>>>>> shells at one another.
>>>>>

>>>>> �It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,� Ciokon
>>>>> recalled. �I


>>>>> was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back to
>>>>> my

>>>>> room.�
>>>>>
>>>>> Ciokon slept soundly � until the blast catapulted him out of his

>>>>> cot
>>>>> at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>>>>>

>>>>> �I did a complete cartwheel,� he said. �In midair, I grabbed my
>>>>> helmet
>>>>> and my flak jacket.�


>>>>>
>>>>> At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his
>>>>> building. He
>>>>> raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
>>>>> barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>>>>>

>>>>> �It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building,�
>>>>> Ciokon
>>>>> said. �I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me
>>>>> around,
>>>>> covered in dust, like zombies.�


>>>>>
>>>>> Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
>>>>> building.
>>>>>
>>>>> Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize
>>>>> his
>>>>> broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They
>>>>> traded
>>>>> their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>>>>>
>>>>> Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>>>>>

>>>>> �You learn to live with it,� Ciokon said. �It never gets easier.�
>>>>>

>>>>> The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war
>>>>> raged
>>>>> for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in
>>>>> control
>>>>> of the country.
>>>>>
>>>>> Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin
>>>>> bombings
>>>>> and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847
>>>>> and a
>>>>> series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed to
>>>>> have
>>>>> met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a car
>>>>> bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
>>>>> responsibility.
>>>>>
>>>>> Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut
>>>>> veterans
>>>>> for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument listing
>>>>> the
>>>>> names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>>>>>

>>>>> �The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the
>>>>> years,�
>>>>> Geraghty said. �Every day I pray for them. Every day.�

Nightcrawler

unread,
Sep 13, 2009, 2:34:46 PM9/13/09
to
Typical thought process of a Devil Dog. None.

Did you skull fuck the Joos before sending them back?

"Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message

news:7h32mnF...@mid.individual.net...

Alexander

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 12:24:36 AM9/14/09
to


No. We left them virgins for your kind.
>
>
>

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 10:20:38 AM9/14/09
to
On Sep 11, 8:04 am, Warhol <mol...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> A Mossad truck bomb that killed 242 marines  in 1983 Beirut
>
> The 1983 Bombing Of The Marine Barracks In Beirut.http://judicial-inc.biz/Beirut_false_flag.htm

>
> Revelations:
>
> "The Jewish people as a whole will be its own Messiah. It will attain
> world domination by the dissolution of other races...and by the
> establishment of a world republic in which everywhere the Jews will
> exercise the privilege of citizenship. In this New World Order the
> Children of Israel...will furnish all the leaders without encountering
> opposition..." (Karl Marx in a letter to Baruch Levy, quoted in Review
> de Paris, June 1, 1928, p. 574)
>
> Pentagon Analyst Dr. Beter's:
>
> November 3, 1982 "...I reported that the Marines had been sent there
> to become the focus of a major incident. The Mossad is to arrange for
> a number of our Marines to be killed in an incident that will be
> blamed on the Arabs! This will be used to inflame American public
> opinion to help lead us into war, including ultimately nuclear war."

It seems that our false flag efforts are better than most. Only hope
is that such disclosures don't get you and the few others like
yourself dead.

~ BG

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 10:53:17 AM9/14/09
to
On Sep 11, 2:20 pm, cornholio <andxor...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Muslimes and the truth rarely meet.

To some extent, most religions forbid the truth, and whatever
revisionism simply isn't allowed.

~ BG

Alex

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 11:31:40 AM9/14/09
to

you're right because they study talmud
www.talmudunmasked.com

Alex

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 11:37:44 AM9/14/09
to

Christians are to seek the Truth cause it is God according to the
bible.

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 1:44:40 PM9/14/09
to

Is Warhol on vacation? (? got nasty flu ?)

~ BG

Alexander

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 7:30:21 PM9/14/09
to
Alex wrote:


What Christians have thought of the Talmud is amply proved by the many
edicts and decrees issued about it, by which the supreme rulers in
Church and State proscribed it many times and condemned this sacred
Secondary Law Code of the Jews to the flames.

In 553 the Emperor Justinian forbade the spread of the Talmudic books
throughout the Roman Empire.(15) In the 13th century "Popes Gregory IX
and Innocent IV condemned the books of the Talmud as containing every
kind of vileness and blasphemy against Christian truth, and ordered them
to be burned because they spread many horrible heresies."(16)

****************************************************

TOLDOTH IESCHU---the Generations of Jesus. A little pamphlet full of
blasphemies and maledictions. Contains the history of Christ. Full of
false and deceiving manifestations.

Majd al-Din

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 7:32:43 PM9/14/09
to

The Jews do get to him every once in a while. Many have had their ISP
rights assassinated by them. I just sue the shit of them when they mess
with me.
>
> ~ BG

American Eagle

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 7:39:39 PM9/14/09
to

There is no truth in organized religion. As such these organizations are
merely tools of controlling masses of people. Histories blood baths are
products of religious competition to see who can control the most
masses. Look at the Jews. 4000 years of bloody conflict and now they
have trapped the great Western Powers into their ridiculous
conflagrations. I am deeply ashamed of the corrupt SOB's that are the
leaders that have dragged America into this terrible foolishness. There
is only one way out for us. Nuke the entire ME and be done with it. Kick
every zionist out or execute them on the spot.
>
> ~ BG

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 14, 2009, 9:31:44 PM9/14/09
to

Why not populate Mars with them?

~ BG

Stewart

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 1:50:53 AM9/15/09
to

"Alexander" <Alex...@thegreat.org> wrote in message
news:7h3i1vF...@mid.individual.net...

No threat implie, only statement of fact.

>>>>>> terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 � and ultimately to the

>>>>>> U.S.
>>>>>> war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried
>>>>>> in
>>>>>> Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
>>>>>> Beirut.
>>>>>>

>>>>>> �Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
>>>>>> essentially the same crowd?� said Geraghty, who lives in
>>>>>> Phoenix. �The
>>>>>> enemy learned: Terrorism works.�
>>>>>>

>>>>>> Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief
>>>>>> at the
>>>>>> time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked
>>>>>> alongside
>>>>>> the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of
>>>>>> the tiny
>>>>>> television and radio detachment.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in
>>>>>> death and
>>>>>> failure.
>>>>>>

>>>>>> �We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and
>>>>>> then we
>>>>>> just leave,� Ciokon said. �Why did we give these lives?�


>>>>>>
>>>>>> The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a
>>>>>> fragile
>>>>>> peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from
>>>>>> Jordan,
>>>>>> took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian
>>>>>> and
>>>>>> Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as
>>>>>> Iran, Syria
>>>>>> and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a
>>>>>> no-man's
>>>>>> land of urban warfare.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange
>>>>>> for an
>>>>>> Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made
>>>>>> up of
>>>>>> troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
>>>>>> difficult to defend because the airport remained open for
>>>>>> business and
>>>>>> because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.
>>>>>>

>>>>>> �It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
>>>>>> reasons,� Geraghty said. �I was uneasy from Day One that we
>>>>>> were in
>>>>>> that position.�


>>>>>>
>>>>>> He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine
>>>>>> Amphibious
>>>>>> Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete
>>>>>> building
>>>>>> that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led
>>>>>> forces of
>>>>>> the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy
>>>>>> in
>>>>>> April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>>>>>>

>>>>>> �We walked into the middle of a family feud,� Ciokon said, �and
>>>>>> they
>>>>>> all turned their guns on us.�


>>>>>>
>>>>>> Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the
>>>>>> barracks
>>>>>> bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took
>>>>>> potshots
>>>>>> at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his
>>>>>> requests for
>>>>>> stronger defenses.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment
>>>>>> from
>>>>>> tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the
>>>>>> Marine
>>>>>> Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to
>>>>>> the
>>>>>> roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias
>>>>>> lobbed
>>>>>> shells at one another.
>>>>>>

>>>>>> �It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,� Ciokon
>>>>>> recalled. �I


>>>>>> was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back
>>>>>> to my

>>>>>> room.�
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Ciokon slept soundly � until the blast catapulted him out of

>>>>>> his cot
>>>>>> at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>>>>>>

>>>>>> �I did a complete cartwheel,� he said. �In midair, I grabbed my
>>>>>> helmet
>>>>>> and my flak jacket.�


>>>>>>
>>>>>> At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his
>>>>>> building. He
>>>>>> raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
>>>>>> barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>>>>>>

>>>>>> �It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building,�
>>>>>> Ciokon
>>>>>> said. �I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me
>>>>>> around,
>>>>>> covered in dust, like zombies.�


>>>>>>
>>>>>> Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
>>>>>> building.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize
>>>>>> his
>>>>>> broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They
>>>>>> traded
>>>>>> their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>>>>>>

>>>>>> �You learn to live with it,� Ciokon said. �It never gets
>>>>>> easier.�
>>>>>>

>>>>>> The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war
>>>>>> raged
>>>>>> for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in
>>>>>> control
>>>>>> of the country.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin
>>>>>> bombings
>>>>>> and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847
>>>>>> and a
>>>>>> series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed
>>>>>> to have
>>>>>> met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a
>>>>>> car
>>>>>> bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
>>>>>> responsibility.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut
>>>>>> veterans
>>>>>> for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument
>>>>>> listing the
>>>>>> names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>>>>>>

>>>>>> �The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the
>>>>>> years,�
>>>>>> Geraghty said. �Every day I pray for them. Every day.�

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 1:00:15 PM9/15/09
to

Is there any way of our helping Warhol to survive the kosher
gauntlet? (or is it too late?)

Obviously Zionist/Jews don't like being messed with, and they sure as
hell don't want the general public knowing how internally unpoliced
their faith-based cabal has been for all these centuries.

btw; can I borrow some legal expertise/services from those lawyers of
yours?

Any chance you or others you know of can help expedite or otherwise
finance my research?

~ BG

drahcir

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 1:15:28 PM9/15/09
to

LOL! Brad, if nothing else, you have a vivid imagination.

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 1:23:58 PM9/15/09
to

Among many considerations, the mutually perpetrated cold-war was not
"vivid imagination".

What else are you in kosher denial about?

Are you also pretending to be an Atheist?

~ BG

BDK

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 2:37:09 PM9/15/09
to
In article <52ec7b8f-e502-4474-9735-
adb7f8...@r24g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, brad...@gmail.com says...

Whatever he might be "pretending" to be, he's doing a lot better job of
it than you are, pretending to be sane.
--

BDK..
Leader of the nonexistent paid shills.
Non Jew Jew Club founding member.
Former number one Kook Magnet, title passed to Iarnrod.

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 4:49:11 PM9/15/09
to
On Sep 15, 11:37 am, BDK <TopSh...@sanity.com> wrote:
> In article <52ec7b8f-e502-4474-9735-
> adb7f8962...@r24g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, bradg...@gmail.com says...

If anyone knows about pretending, Big Dumb Kunt knows best.

~ BG

Jewdas

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 7:24:01 PM9/15/09
to

Ignore Stewie, He is just another Bolshevik commie supporting Joo-land.

>>>>>>> terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 � and ultimately to the

>>>>>>> U.S.
>>>>>>> war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried
>>>>>>> in
>>>>>>> Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
>>>>>>> Beirut.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> �Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
>>>>>>> essentially the same crowd?� said Geraghty, who lives in
>>>>>>> Phoenix. �The
>>>>>>> enemy learned: Terrorism works.�
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief
>>>>>>> at the
>>>>>>> time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked
>>>>>>> alongside
>>>>>>> the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of
>>>>>>> the tiny
>>>>>>> television and radio detachment.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in
>>>>>>> death and
>>>>>>> failure.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> �We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and
>>>>>>> then we
>>>>>>> just leave,� Ciokon said. �Why did we give these lives?�


>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a
>>>>>>> fragile
>>>>>>> peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from
>>>>>>> Jordan,
>>>>>>> took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian
>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>> Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as
>>>>>>> Iran, Syria
>>>>>>> and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a
>>>>>>> no-man's
>>>>>>> land of urban warfare.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange
>>>>>>> for an
>>>>>>> Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made
>>>>>>> up of
>>>>>>> troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
>>>>>>> difficult to defend because the airport remained open for
>>>>>>> business and
>>>>>>> because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> �It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
>>>>>>> reasons,� Geraghty said. �I was uneasy from Day One that we
>>>>>>> were in
>>>>>>> that position.�


>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine
>>>>>>> Amphibious
>>>>>>> Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete
>>>>>>> building
>>>>>>> that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led
>>>>>>> forces of
>>>>>>> the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy
>>>>>>> in
>>>>>>> April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> �We walked into the middle of a family feud,� Ciokon said, �and
>>>>>>> they
>>>>>>> all turned their guns on us.�


>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the
>>>>>>> barracks
>>>>>>> bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took
>>>>>>> potshots
>>>>>>> at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his
>>>>>>> requests for
>>>>>>> stronger defenses.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment
>>>>>>> from
>>>>>>> tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the
>>>>>>> Marine
>>>>>>> Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias
>>>>>>> lobbed
>>>>>>> shells at one another.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> �It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,� Ciokon
>>>>>>> recalled. �I


>>>>>>> was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back
>>>>>>> to my

>>>>>>> room.�
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Ciokon slept soundly � until the blast catapulted him out of

>>>>>>> his cot
>>>>>>> at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> �I did a complete cartwheel,� he said. �In midair, I grabbed my
>>>>>>> helmet
>>>>>>> and my flak jacket.�


>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his
>>>>>>> building. He
>>>>>>> raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
>>>>>>> barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> �It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building,�
>>>>>>> Ciokon
>>>>>>> said. �I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me
>>>>>>> around,
>>>>>>> covered in dust, like zombies.�


>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
>>>>>>> building.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize
>>>>>>> his
>>>>>>> broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They
>>>>>>> traded
>>>>>>> their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> �You learn to live with it,� Ciokon said. �It never gets
>>>>>>> easier.�
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war
>>>>>>> raged
>>>>>>> for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in
>>>>>>> control
>>>>>>> of the country.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin
>>>>>>> bombings
>>>>>>> and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847
>>>>>>> and a
>>>>>>> series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed
>>>>>>> to have
>>>>>>> met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a
>>>>>>> car
>>>>>>> bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
>>>>>>> responsibility.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut
>>>>>>> veterans
>>>>>>> for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument
>>>>>>> listing the
>>>>>>> names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>> �The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the
>>>>>>> years,�
>>>>>>> Geraghty said. �Every day I pray for them. Every day.�

Nightcrawler

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 7:36:44 PM9/15/09
to

"Jewdas" <Jew...@circumcision.com> wrote in message
news:7ham0iF...@mid.individual.net...

>>>>>>>> terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 � and ultimately to the U.S.


>>>>>>>> war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are buried in
>>>>>>>> Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed in
>>>>>>>> Beirut.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are (fighting)
>>>>>>>> essentially the same crowd?� said Geraghty, who lives in Phoenix. �The
>>>>>>>> enemy learned: Terrorism works.�
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior Chief at the
>>>>>>>> time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked alongside
>>>>>>>> the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of the tiny
>>>>>>>> television and radio detachment.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in death and
>>>>>>>> failure.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and then we
>>>>>>>> just leave,� Ciokon said. �Why did we give these lives?�


>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> The Beirut mission started out as an effort to stabilize a fragile
>>>>>>>> peace in a war-torn country. Lebanon had been in turmoil since the
>>>>>>>> Palestine Liberation Organization, having been expelled from Jordan,
>>>>>>>> took refuge there in the 1970s. In 1975, a panoply of Christian and
>>>>>>>> Muslim militias, some backed by neighboring powers such as Iran, Syria
>>>>>>>> and Israel, turned what had been a Middle East oasis into a no-man's
>>>>>>>> land of urban warfare.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Israel invaded in 1982, hoping to crush the PLO. In exchange for an
>>>>>>>> Israeli withdrawal, the U.N. sent in a peacekeeping force made up of
>>>>>>>> troops from Great Britain, France, Italy and the United States.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> U.S. forces set up camp at Beirut International Airport, a spot
>>>>>>>> difficult to defend because the airport remained open for business and
>>>>>>>> because warring factions controlled strategic hillsides nearby.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
>>>>>>>> reasons,� Geraghty said. �I was uneasy from Day One that we were in
>>>>>>>> that position.�


>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine Amphibious
>>>>>>>> Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete building
>>>>>>>> that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to view the
>>>>>>>> United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led forces of
>>>>>>>> the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S. Embassy in
>>>>>>>> April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �We walked into the middle of a family feud,� Ciokon said, �and they
>>>>>>>> all turned their guns on us.�


>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the barracks
>>>>>>>> bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took potshots
>>>>>>>> at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his requests for
>>>>>>>> stronger defenses.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast detachment from
>>>>>>>> tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the Marine
>>>>>>>> Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed to the
>>>>>>>> roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias lobbed
>>>>>>>> shells at one another.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,� Ciokon recalled. �I


>>>>>>>> was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back to my

>>>>>>>> room.�
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Ciokon slept soundly � until the blast catapulted him out of his cot


>>>>>>>> at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �I did a complete cartwheel,� he said. �In midair, I grabbed my helmet
>>>>>>>> and my flak jacket.�


>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his building. He
>>>>>>>> raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief. The
>>>>>>>> barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the building,� Ciokon
>>>>>>>> said. �I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me around,
>>>>>>>> covered in dust, like zombies.�


>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of the
>>>>>>>> building.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to organize his
>>>>>>>> broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air. They traded
>>>>>>>> their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �You learn to live with it,� Ciokon said. �It never gets easier.�
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war raged
>>>>>>>> for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in control
>>>>>>>> of the country.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin bombings
>>>>>>>> and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight 847 and a
>>>>>>>> series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed to have
>>>>>>>> met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a car
>>>>>>>> bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
>>>>>>>> responsibility.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut veterans
>>>>>>>> for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument listing the
>>>>>>>> names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the years,�
>>>>>>>> Geraghty said. �Every day I pray for them. Every day.�

This is one hairy bush. Has anyone ever contemplated trimming the beaver?


Majd al-Din

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 7:40:00 PM9/15/09
to
BradGuth wrote:
> On Sep 14, 4:32 pm, Majd al-Din <Is...@Sucks.com> wrote:
>> BradGuth wrote:
>>> On Sep 12, 7:18 pm, Jewdas <Jew...@circumcision.com> wrote:
>>>> cornholio wrote:
>>>>> Muslimes and the truth rarely meet.
>>>> Let me correct that
>>>> Jews and Truth *NEVER* meet.
>>> Is Warhol on vacation? (? got nasty flu ?)
>> The Jews do get to him every once in a while. Many have had their ISP
>> rights assassinated by them. I just sue the shit of them when they mess
>> with me.
>
> Is there any way of our helping Warhol to survive the kosher
> gauntlet? (or is it too late?)

Email his ISP to see if he is still on line. If a reason is given
why not.. Post that reason here and many will or should email a protest
if it is Zionist antifreespeech complaints. Surprisingly enough even
some of the Jews resent free speech being impugned and enjoy his social
malarkey.


>
> Obviously Zionist/Jews don't like being messed with, and they sure as
> hell don't want the general public knowing how internally unpoliced
> their faith-based cabal has been for all these centuries.

fer a fact. But they should not be posting in nonJewish NG's if they
can't take the heat. I don't see any real Islamics posting here, so they
are either too polite to do that of busy fomenting the law of sharia or
both.


>
> btw; can I borrow some legal expertise/services from those lawyers of
> yours?

All Lawyers are Coin operational. There are free legal call up centers
in every American city. Villanova and Georegtown Universities have some
excellent upper grads that answer helpline questions on International Law.


>
> Any chance you or others you know of can help expedite or otherwise
> finance my research?

Try a Jewish research non profit taxfree organization.
>
> ~ BG

American Eagle

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 7:42:07 PM9/15/09
to

The cost of the tickets to transport them is astronomical and why infest
a clean planet?
>
> ~ BG

Nightcrawler

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 8:00:47 PM9/15/09
to
If the Joos are gone then what are the rest of us normal folk to do
with the anti-Joos?


"American Eagle" <A...@USA.com> wrote in message news:7han2hF...@mid.individual.net...

Jewdas

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 8:02:55 PM9/15/09
to
Nightcrawler wrote:
> If the Joos are gone then what are the rest of us normal folk to do
> with the anti-Joos?

No matter..No antimatter.. Get the picture? Simple physics.

Nightcrawler

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 9:02:40 PM9/15/09
to
When the Joos are gone, all is gone?

"Jewdas" <Jew...@circumcision.com> wrote in message

news:7hao9hF...@mid.individual.net...

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 16, 2009, 1:00:30 AM9/16/09
to

I was thinking of giving them an option, of being locally tried for
treason and put to death, or they can pay for their own one-way ticket
to Mars.

~ BG

Stewart

unread,
Sep 16, 2009, 1:28:20 AM9/16/09
to

"Jewdas" <Jew...@circumcision.com> wrote in message
news:7ham0iF...@mid.individual.net...

ZOG rules.

>>>>>>>> terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 � and ultimately to

>>>>>>>> the U.S.
>>>>>>>> war dead from Iraq and Afghanistan, hundreds of whom are
>>>>>>>> buried in
>>>>>>>> Arlington's Section 60, a few hundred feet from those killed
>>>>>>>> in
>>>>>>>> Beirut.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �Who would have thought, 25 years later, here we are
>>>>>>>> (fighting)


>>>>>>>> essentially the same crowd?� said Geraghty, who lives in
>>>>>>>> Phoenix. �The
>>>>>>>> enemy learned: Terrorism works.�
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> Joe Ciokon, now 69 and living in Poway, was a Navy Senior
>>>>>>>> Chief at the
>>>>>>>> time, the highest-ranking of 128 enlisted sailors who worked
>>>>>>>> alongside
>>>>>>>> the Marines in Beirut. A Navy journalist, he was in charge of
>>>>>>>> the tiny
>>>>>>>> television and radio detachment.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> It still frustrates him that the two-year mission ended in
>>>>>>>> death and
>>>>>>>> failure.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �We invested all this time and money and sweat and blood, and
>>>>>>>> then we
>>>>>>>> just leave,� Ciokon said. �Why did we give these lives?�

>>>>>>>> �It was selected almost entirely for diplomatic and political
>>>>>>>> reasons,� Geraghty said. �I was uneasy from Day One that we
>>>>>>>> were in
>>>>>>>> that position.�


>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> He bunked most of his men, who were from the 24th Marine
>>>>>>>> Amphibious
>>>>>>>> Unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in a sturdy, four-story concrete
>>>>>>>> building
>>>>>>>> that had once been the PLO headquarters.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> The situation fell apart quickly. Militia leaders began to
>>>>>>>> view the
>>>>>>>> United States and its allies as favoring the Christian-led
>>>>>>>> forces of
>>>>>>>> the Lebanese government. A car-bomb attack at the U.S.
>>>>>>>> Embassy in
>>>>>>>> April 1983 that killed 63 people emphasized the point.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �We walked into the middle of a family feud,� Ciokon said,
>>>>>>>> �and they
>>>>>>>> all turned their guns on us.�


>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Geraghty felt the growing danger in the weeks before the
>>>>>>>> barracks
>>>>>>>> bombing. Artillery shells fell on his compound. Snipers took
>>>>>>>> potshots
>>>>>>>> at his men. But Geraghty's Pentagon superiors spiked his
>>>>>>>> requests for
>>>>>>>> stronger defenses.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> On October 22, 1983, Ciokon had moved his broadcast
>>>>>>>> detachment from
>>>>>>>> tents next to the barracks to a neighboring building, the
>>>>>>>> Marine
>>>>>>>> Safety Headquarters. That night, about midnight, he climbed
>>>>>>>> to the
>>>>>>>> roof of the Marine barracks. He watched as the local militias
>>>>>>>> lobbed
>>>>>>>> shells at one another.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �It was so cool up there, I was kind of relaxing,� Ciokon
>>>>>>>> recalled. �I


>>>>>>>> was thinking about staying up there to sleep, but I went back
>>>>>>>> to my

>>>>>>>> room.�
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Ciokon slept soundly � until the blast catapulted him out of

>>>>>>>> his cot
>>>>>>>> at 6:22 a.m. Oct. 23.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �I did a complete cartwheel,� he said. �In midair, I grabbed
>>>>>>>> my helmet
>>>>>>>> and my flak jacket.�


>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> At first Ciokon thought an artillery shell had struck his
>>>>>>>> building. He
>>>>>>>> raced outside with his roommate, a newly minted Navy chief.
>>>>>>>> The
>>>>>>>> barracks next door had collapsed into rubble.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �It looked like a fog, but it was the dust from the
>>>>>>>> building,� Ciokon
>>>>>>>> said. �I noticed there were a bunch of Marines following me
>>>>>>>> around,
>>>>>>>> covered in dust, like zombies.�


>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Everyone in the compound scrambled to pull survivors out of
>>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>>> building.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Within an hour, though, Ciokon's superiors told him to
>>>>>>>> organize his
>>>>>>>> broadcast team and get the radio station back on the air.
>>>>>>>> They traded
>>>>>>>> their shovels for cameras and recorded the carnage.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Twenty-five years haven't erased the memories.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �You learn to live with it,� Ciokon said. �It never gets
>>>>>>>> easier.�
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> The Marines' departure brought Beirut no peace. The civil war
>>>>>>>> raged
>>>>>>>> for seven more years until a settlement left Syria firmly in
>>>>>>>> control
>>>>>>>> of the country.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Experts believe Imad Mugniyah played a key role in the twin
>>>>>>>> bombings
>>>>>>>> and went on to mastermind the 1985 hijacking of TWA Flight
>>>>>>>> 847 and a
>>>>>>>> series of kidnappings of Americans in Lebanon. He is believed
>>>>>>>> to have
>>>>>>>> met with bin Laden in Sudan in 1996 and was assassinated in a
>>>>>>>> car
>>>>>>>> bombing in Damascus, Syria, in February. No one has claimed
>>>>>>>> responsibility.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Today Ciokon and Geraghty will join hundreds of other Beirut
>>>>>>>> veterans
>>>>>>>> for a candlelight vigil at Camp Lejeune, near a monument
>>>>>>>> listing the
>>>>>>>> names of all who died. A Marine stands perpetually at guard.
>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> �The hurt and the sorrow hasn't lessened one iota over the
>>>>>>>> years,�
>>>>>>>> Geraghty said. �Every day I pray for them. Every day.�

BDK

unread,
Sep 16, 2009, 2:11:37 AM9/16/09
to
In article <e14d990f-ee01-44a6-a0f1-4e1e01fcd120
@e4g2000prn.googlegroups.com>, brad...@gmail.com says...


I'll bite, what am I supposedly pretending?

Don't disappoint me with the usual jew nonsense, or paid shill BS Brad,
I know you can be crazier than that.

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 16, 2009, 1:17:19 PM9/16/09
to
On Sep 15, 11:11 pm, BDK <TopSh...@sanity.com> wrote:
>
> > If anyone knows about pretending, Big Dumb Kunt knows best.
>
> >  ~ BG
>
> I'll bite, what am I supposedly pretending?
>
> Don't disappoint me with the usual jew nonsense, or paid shill BS Brad,
> I know you can be crazier than that.
> --
>
> BDK..
> Leader of the nonexistent paid shills.
> Non Jew Jew Club founding member.
> Former number one Kook Magnet, title passed to Iarnrod.

You and rabbi Saul speak on behalf of all Zionist/Jews and Nazism,
plus Republicans to boot. What more can anyone possibly have to say
that'll equal or much less surpass whatever you have going?

Your own pretend-unJewish and pretend-Atheism is also noted.

~ BG

partisan

unread,
Sep 16, 2009, 1:25:39 PM9/16/09
to
YES WE DID ALL EXEPT YOUR BRAIN WICH IR DAMAGED FROM YOUR BIRTHDAY!
PISS OFF!

BDK

unread,
Sep 17, 2009, 1:46:40 AM9/17/09
to
In article <1f38fcb7-635e-4323-8894-
1a7f5d...@g1g2000pra.googlegroups.com>, brad...@gmail.com says...

> On Sep 15, 11:11 pm, BDK <TopSh...@sanity.com> wrote:
> >
> > > If anyone knows about pretending, Big Dumb Kunt knows best.
> >
> > >  ~ BG
> >
> > I'll bite, what am I supposedly pretending?
> >
> > Don't disappoint me with the usual jew nonsense, or paid shill BS Brad,
> > I know you can be crazier than that.
> > --
> >
> > BDK..
> > Leader of the nonexistent paid shills.
> > Non Jew Jew Club founding member.
> > Former number one Kook Magnet, title passed to Iarnrod.
>
> You and rabbi Saul speak on behalf of all Zionist/Jews and Nazism,
> plus Republicans to boot.

Why would you think that, Brad? I have no connection with any of those
people, so why would you "think" I'm their spokesman? I'm not even a
conservative.

> What more can anyone possibly have to say
> that'll equal or much less surpass whatever you have going?

What do I have going? I'm curious as to what delusions you've come up
with about me. This could be a classic.

>
> Your own pretend-unJewish and pretend-Atheism is also noted.
>
> ~ BG
>

I've been an atheist since I was a small child, and a non-jew since I
was born. No pretense needed..

So what's happening on Venus lately?

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 18, 2009, 5:07:23 AM9/18/09
to

Your devout hatred of all nonjewish humanity has been noted.

Where is Hasan ben Ahmed Rais Uli Von JEDI (Warhol)?

Gone to Mecca?

Gone to visit his “lake of fire”?

Doing his month long Ramadan thing? (fasting from Usenet/newsgroups?)

~ BG

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 19, 2009, 10:53:51 AM9/19/09
to
Where is our most favorite Usenet/newsgroup doom and gloom wizard
“Hasan ben Ahmed Rais Uli Von JEDI” (Warhol)?

Gone off to Mecca?

Gone to visit his “lake of fire”?

Doing his month long Ramadan thing? (fasting from Usenet/newsgroups?)

What have you silly pretend-Atheists (aka Jews and Zionist Nazis) done
with our Warhol?

More than likely Semites had our Warhol killed, and of course nicely
false flagged so that it looks like other Muslims or some other crazy
faith-based group (other than Jewish) did the killing. As otherwise
“Hasan ben Ahmed Rais Uli Von JEDI” (Warhol) would still be posting
his usual investigative reporting, plus sharing those nifty doom and
gloom topics and replies, at least once in a while.

Brad Guth, Brad_Guth, Brad.Guth, BradGuth, BG / “Guth Usenet”

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 20, 2009, 5:24:29 PM9/20/09
to
Where is our most favorite Usenet/newsgroup doom and gloom wizard
“Hasan ben Ahmed Rais Uli Von JEDI” (Warhol)?

BDK

unread,
Sep 20, 2009, 8:33:33 PM9/20/09
to
In article <9e92e18a-fc80-477e-ba9f-
3f73e5...@a39g2000pre.googlegroups.com>, brad...@gmail.com says...

> Where is our most favorite Usenet/newsgroup doom and gloom wizard
> =3FHasan ben Ahmed Rais Uli Von JEDI=3F (Warhol)?

>
> On Sep 19, 7:53 am, BradGuth <bradg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Where is our most favorite Usenet/newsgroup doom and gloom wizard
> > =3FHasan ben Ahmed Rais Uli Von JEDI=3F (Warhol)?
> >
> > Gone off to Mecca?
> >
> > Gone to visit his =3Flake of fire=3F?

> >
> > Doing his month long Ramadan thing? (fasting from Usenet/newsgroups?)
> >
> > What have you silly pretend-Atheists (aka Jews and Zionist Nazis) done
> > with our Warhol?
> >
> > More than likely Semites had our Warhol killed, and of course nicely
> > false flagged so that it looks like other Muslims or some other crazy
> > faith-based group (other than Jewish) did the killing.  As otherwise
> > =3FHasan ben Ahmed Rais Uli Von JEDI=3F (Warhol) would still be posting

> > his usual investigative reporting, plus sharing those nifty doom and
> > gloom topics and replies, at least once in a while.
> >
> >  Brad Guth, Brad_Guth, Brad.Guth, BradGuth, BG / =3FGuth Usenet=3F

> >
> > On Sep 11, 8:04 am, Warhol <mol...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > A Mossad truck bomb that killed 242 marines  in 1983 Beirut
> >
> > > The 1983 Bombing Of The Marine Barracks In Beirut.http://judicial-inc.biz/Beirut_false_flag.htm
> >
> > > Revelations:
> >
> > > "The Jewish people as a whole will be its own Messiah. It will attain
> > > world domination by the dissolution of other races...and by the
> > > establishment of a world republic in which everywhere the Jews will
> > > exercise the privilege of citizenship. In this New World Order the
> > > Children of Israel...will furnish all the leaders without encountering
> > > opposition..." (Karl Marx in a letter to Baruch Levy, quoted in Review
> > > de Paris, June 1, 1928, p. 574)
> >
> > > Pentagon Analyst Dr. Beter's:
> >
> > > November 3, 1982 "...I reported that the Marines had been sent there
> > > to become the focus of a major incident. The Mossad is to arrange for
> > > a number of our Marines to be killed in an incident that will be
> > > blamed on the Arabs! This will be used to inflame American public
> > > opinion to help lead us into war, including ultimately nuclear war."
>
> Where is our most favorite Usenet/newsgroup doom and gloom wizard
> =3FHasan ben Ahmed Rais Uli Von JEDI=3F (Warhol)?
>

Maybe squatting in the corner of his padded cell, or maybe squatting in
the gutter, or maybe squatting in the corner of his home, a refrigerator
box, doing what he does so well, while howling like a monkey on
steroids, calling for you?

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 21, 2009, 8:20:58 AM9/21/09
to
On Sep 20, 5:33 pm, BDK <TopSh...@sanity.com> wrote:
> In article <9e92e18a-fc80-477e-ba9f-
> 3f73e5cd0...@a39g2000pre.googlegroups.com>, bradg...@gmail.com says...

?

drahcir

unread,
Sep 21, 2009, 8:55:52 AM9/21/09
to

Um, yes, but it seems you must have forgotten the topic, which was
your (perhaps drug-induced), hilarious Mossad dream.


>
> What else are you in kosher denial about?

Fairies, genies, leprechauns, and the possibility you are sane.


>
> Are you also pretending to be an Atheist?

Why do you care?

>
>  ~ BG

drahcir

unread,
Sep 21, 2009, 8:56:48 AM9/21/09
to
On Sep 15, 2:37 pm, BDK <TopSh...@sanity.com> wrote:
> In article <52ec7b8f-e502-4474-9735-
> adb7f8962...@r24g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, bradg...@gmail.com says...

It's going to be hard for anyone here to believe that I made my post
just before I read yours. Oh well....

BradGuth

unread,
Sep 21, 2009, 9:34:41 AM9/21/09
to