Masters Course Experience Analysis for the Web

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Eldonbraun

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Dec 16, 2005, 11:10:54 AM12/16/05
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Here is a preliminary draft of an addition that will soon go on the web
at www.avatarscam.com/. It is intended to add a "Consumer Reports"
analysis of the Avatar Master course, mainly from the viewpoint of the
course's potential as a business opportunity. I believe the facts and
observations are correct as things currently stand, but of course the
"policy" of Star's Edge is nebulous. I have already had this reviewed
by a currently licensed Master in good standing with Star's Edge. If
anyone wants to offer critiques or corrections before this goes on the
Internet, please do.

My invitation to comment and correct naturally includes Star's Edge,
although you'll have to be specific for a change. Some documentation
wouldn't hurt either.
--Best, Eldon
-------------
MY AVATAR MASTERS COURSE EXPERIENCE
by V____.

(introduction in italics)
After completing the basic Avatar Course, it is likely that you will be
"invited" to take the Masters Course. Here is one student's
account of her experiences. At the end of this article is a summary and
checklist of steps to take before you hand over $3,000 to Star's Edge
for the course.

------
[NOTE: V's 6,000-word narrative of her experience at the Masters Course
will be inserted here on the web page. It is already posted on a.c.a.
in three parts if you haven't read it. It will be followed by the
analysis and advice below.]
-----

How the system works
by Eldon M. Braun

So you've been honored with an invitation to take the Master
(trainer) course? Your Avatar Master may have recommended you for a
good reason: Masters are paid a commission of 10% ($300) for referring
their students to this second course that is provided by Star's Edge
several times a year.

If you decide to take the Master course, it might be because you've
been told you will really "get" Avatar by taking the next level. Or
maybe you wish to deliver the Avatar course as a business. In either
case, you should know that the Master course is mainly a repeat of the
Avatar course, except for a few aspects:
* You will deliver Initiation Sessions to other students repeatedly, on
a reciprocal basis,
* You will read and practice the Serious Drill," a technique for
lightening up students,
* You will be encouraged to plant "white worms" or subliminal
suggestions about how peachy keen students are doing, and
* You will use the CHP on "persistent identities" by handling them
as persistent masses with the same technique you learned on the basic
course.

You might want to read through the Master course materials before
making your decision. See the "Free Master Course" link at left and
follow the instructions.

If you hope to become licensed as an Avatar master so you can deliver
the basic course, there are some important things you should know.
Please put your idealism aside as you read this. Sure, you had a
rewarding spiritual experience on the basic course, but you also need
to consider that Star's Edge is a for-profit business enterprise, not
a religious organization. So look at this the same way you would if you
were planning to invest in a franchised fast food restaurant. Here's
a preview of what you can expect.

At the course, Avra and the trainers will be running a
behind-the-scenes hidden agenda designed to identify and eliminate
students who might be independent thinkers or prone to express any
reservations about the practices of Star's Edge. If you don't toe
the line and gratefully worship Avra and the Star's Edge trainers,
you might as well forget about ever "passing" the course and
getting even a provisional license to intern at your own expense.

You'll see this happening at every Master course. It's a scapegoat
technique used to intimidate the rest of the group into obedience and
"alignment." Landmark Education does it too, except they kick a
student or two entirely off the course at the beginning and write
refund checks. Avra assigns interminable Feel-Its or "special
processes" as punishment. These are not only degrading, but are
likely to prevent the "stuck identity" students from successfully
completing the course. The secret here is to "get it." You are
supposed to realize that everything Star's Edge does is divinely
inspired and righteous. Avra is a saint and an angel. Harry is a
prophet. if you want to save time, just put a look of rapture on your
face and lay on the adulation real thick.

If you don't "pass" the Master course on the first try, you'll
be told you can come back and review it at no cost--once. The third
time you attend, you'll be charged a reduced fee. Of course, you'll
have to spend ten days plus travel expenses any time you review.

Even if you do "pass" the course, you will not be able to go out
and start delivering the course on your own. At one time this was so,
but no more. Passing the first hurdle means you will be given a
provisional license to intern under your Avatar Master, or more likely
at a large International or Cooperative consolidated Avatar course.
This will cost you $600 per course, plus travel expenses, lodging and
meals.

It's likely that Star's Edge will sell you some Power Packs and an
ad in the Avatar Journal at this point to recruit students you can't
teach without supervision. If you are able to recruit one or more
students from your personal network of friends and family, you will be
expected to collect the full "recommended" course fee from them and
pay a royalty of 25% to star's edge in addition to the intern fee.

How long will you remain a paying intern with a provisional license?
Until you "pass" again to attain the status of Qualified Master.
The conditions for making the grade are pretty arbitrary, just like the
first stage. Obviously, there is some financial incentive to keep you
paying those internship fees for the privilege of "delivering" to
the students you recruit. Some say taking the Pro or Wizard course is a
ticket to Qualified Masterdom. Basically, you'll pass the second
hurdle when those higher in the pecking order decree you ready.

If you already have an established teaching or coaching practice, such
personal growth, yoga or business consulting, you may see the Avatar
Course as an addition to your repertoire of services. You'd better
get this clear beforehand. At one time, many Avatar Masters taught
different things and offered various therapies. Today, Star's Edge
does not like to coexist alongside "other practices," and considers
your new prospects and recruits to be "clients of Star's Edge."
They also encourage (or pressure) local Avatar Masters to bring new
students to the large consolidated courses rather than running small
courses at home or in their offices. Even some longtime successful
Masters have had their licenses pulled for disagreement with these
arbitrary new policies.

But let's say you eventually do become a Qualified Master, and
you're finally allowed to teach the basic Avatar course unsupervised.
If you are successful at recruiting students, the royalties you pay
will go down to 20% after the first ten completions, and then will drop
to 15% after 20 completions. You will be receiving $300 commissions
from Star's Edge for students who go on to the Master course. If you
don't understand these various upline/downline arrangements, you may
want to study up on multilevel marketing. That's what it's called.
Ever heard of Amway?

If you aren't so successful at recruiting students, Star's Edge
will suggest that you take the Pro course for another $2,000 and run
larger ads in the Avatar Journal. Or better yet, "create" $7,500
for the annual Wizard course. You'll be told that Masters who don't
attract many students have stuck identities or hidden beliefs about
failure or some form of guilt trip. So you need to do more work on
yourself.

At some point, you may ask yourself if the basic course might be more
popular at a lower price, or if Star's Edge is doing much to earn
those royalties they collect. Yes, they do publish the Avatar Journal
four times a year, but that hasn't made the phone ring off the hook.
Probably most of the courses you've sold have been to people you
already knew, or people you contacted and pitched to take Avatar
through your own efforts.

If concerns like these arise, it would be best not to address them to
Star's Edge. The answer at best will be an accusation of disloyalty,
or at worst having your license canceled summarily and without
explanation.

What to do before you pay

1. Do some market research. Go to the listings of local Masters at
www.avatarepc.com/ and contact several of them at random by e-mail, or
better yet by phone. Tell them you're interested in taking the Master
course and you wonder if they'd mind sharing with you how they like
it as a business. How did their Avatar Journal ads pull? Are they just
giving the course part time? Could they make a full-time living at it
if they wanted to do that? If any say they aren't currently
delivering, ask why. If any have obsolete contact information and
can't be reached, ask yourself why.

2. Ask Star's Edge to see a copy of the licensing contract before you
pay them for the course. This is just standard business procedure. Tell
them to send a copy, plus royalty and commission figures and other
related documents, by fax or mail or as e-mail attachments you can
print. You want these documents on paper. Do not take no for an answer.


3. Run the documents past an attorney who understands contracts and
licensing agreements. In particular, note the clauses about what
you're expected to charge for the basic Avatar course, and about
following the policies of Star's Edge. The question might occur to
you and the lawyer, "What are the policies?" Answer: Whatever Harry
Palmer says they are at any given moment. There is supposedly a sort of
Board of Directors called the Senior Avatar Council, but nobody has
ever been able to figure out who the members are.

4. The attorney is likely to tell you that some parts of the contract
are unenforceable at best, and that others are so open-ended that
"It's like a gun pointed at your head with Harry Palmer's finger
on the trigger." (that quote is by Harry Palmer, by the way). So make
a list of any reservations you have and communicate them to Star's
Edge. If you want to modify to the contract, ask the lawyer to send the
proposed changes. If you ask, Star's Edge will probably just lay on a
guilt trip and tell you the rules are set in stone.

5. The next time you talk to Star's Edge, you may want to ask some
more pointed questions about the potential opportunity of becoming an
Avatar Master. How long on average do Masters with "provisional
licenses" continue as interns before they become fully licensed? What
percentage of the people who pass the Master course are still
officially delivering Avatar after one year? What percentage are still
delivering after three years? What are the specific policies that might
lead to licensure review, disciplinary actions or suspension? Is a copy
available in writing?

6. Sleep on all the above. Then, the next morning ask yourself a few
questions. "Did Star's Edge answer my questions? Did they provide
full disclosure, or hedge their answers with evasive generalizations?
Did they get defensive or accuse me of being overly suspicious? Did
they ask me if I've been listening to that scummy liar, Eldon
Braun?"

OK, now you have a pretty good picture of whom you're dealing with.
Remember, attending the Master course is your creation. You decide. But
take a good look before you do, OK?

NOTE: The facts given here are correct to the best of my knowledge at
the time of writing. If you find any inaccuracies or hear of any
changes, please let me know and I'll be happy to make updates or
corrections.

Eldon Braun
Eldo...@aol.com

waynemcmahon

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Dec 16, 2005, 11:52:21 AM12/16/05
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Eldon, please oh please don't make Ronald put that on the web.

Eldonbraun

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Dec 16, 2005, 12:10:08 PM12/16/05
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waynemcmahon wrote:
> Eldon, please oh please don't make Ronald put that on the web.
I don't make Ron do anything. He does what he wishes.

As I said, specific commentary and corrections are welcome. Please
provide them as annotations with text quotes and documentation. You my
post them or e-mail them to me.

When you're finished, continue the process: "Why do I hate myself."

waynemcmahon

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Dec 16, 2005, 2:20:38 PM12/16/05
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Well OK then!

So Ronald caused YOU to write this? It's a commisioned work?

--------------------

Eldonbraun

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Dec 16, 2005, 2:39:27 PM12/16/05
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waynemcmahon wrote:
> Well OK then!
>
> So Ronald caused YOU to write this? It's a commisioned work?
No, it is just an exerpt from a forthcoming work that Ron is welcome to
publish as a preview if he wishes. Do you have any comments or
corrections to suggest? Please be specific if that isn't beyond your
capabilities. Otherwise, continue the process.

Barbara

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Dec 16, 2005, 2:45:32 PM12/16/05
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In article <1134749454.8...@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
Eldonbraun <Eldo...@aol.com> wrote:

> Here is a preliminary draft of an addition that will soon go on the web
> at www.avatarscam.com/. It is intended to add a "Consumer Reports"
> analysis of the Avatar Master course, mainly from the viewpoint of the
> course's potential as a business opportunity.

> My invitation to comment and correct naturally includes Star's Edge,


> although you'll have to be specific for a change. Some documentation
> wouldn't hurt either.

I've said it at least 10 times over the past several years, and I'll
say it again: I enjoyed my Avatar course and I got many benefits from
it. Depending on who was delivering it, I would recommend the course.

But I can't say the same for the Masters. I took the course 12 years
ago, and I haven't seen the promotional brochure for three years, but
the course definitely did NOT deliver what was advertised in 1993.

I wish there had been a "Course Analysis" available back in 1993. I
never intended to deliver the course, so the business/licensing aspects
wouldn't mean much. But if I had been warned that it was basically a
repeat of Avatar with a few extras thrown in (exactly as Eldon
described), I would've saved the $3,000 PLUS airfare PLUS hotel PLUS
food.

The promised "look behind the scenes" never happened. There was
nothing that led to a deeper understanding of the primary processes.
(A group of people acting out the CHP like a grade school skit was fun,
but not particularly profound.) I was extremely disappointed.

I can't verify the business aspects of Eldon's post, but the account of
the course is quite accurate. If you're looking for a greater
understanding of Avatar, I suggest you look elsewhere.

Eldonbraun

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Dec 17, 2005, 5:03:48 AM12/17/05
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Barbara wrote:
> In article <1134749454.8...@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> Eldonbraun <Eldo...@aol.com> wrote:
>
> > Here is a preliminary draft of an addition that will soon go on the web
> > at www.avatarscam.com/. It is intended to add a "Consumer Reports"
> > analysis of the Avatar Master course, mainly from the viewpoint of the
> > course's potential as a business opportunity.
>
> > My invitation to comment and correct naturally includes Star's Edge,
> > although you'll have to be specific for a change. Some documentation
> > wouldn't hurt either.
>
> I've said it at least 10 times over the past several years, and I'll
> say it again: I enjoyed my Avatar course and I got many benefits from
> it. Depending on who was delivering it, I would recommend the course.
>
> But I can't say the same for the Masters. I took the course 12 years
> ago, and I haven't seen the promotional brochure for three years, but
> the course definitely did NOT deliver what was advertised in 1993.
>
> I wish there had been a "Course Analysis" available back in 1993. I
> never intended to deliver the course, so the business/licensing aspects
> wouldn't mean much. But if I had been warned that it was basically a
> repeat of Avatar with a few extras thrown in (exactly as Eldon
> described), I would've saved the $3,000 PLUS airfare PLUS hotel PLUS
> food.
Maybe I'll add a little more along these lines. In fact, someone once
remarked that for those who don't want to deliver, the Master course
amounts to a review where you get take-home materials. Here again, we
come to the hypocrisy of hoarding the "secret knowledge" as the
exclusive property of Star's Edge. But of course, that is moot at this
point.

>
> The promised "look behind the scenes" never happened. There was
> nothing that led to a deeper understanding of the primary processes.
> (A group of people acting out the CHP like a grade school skit was fun,
> but not particularly profound.) I was extremely disappointed.
One former Avatar Master (Mieke from Holland) said the group dynamic
effect was a big factor, which would make a difference between a small
and a larger course. I guess that didn't bite for you.

Now that the basic courses are being consolidated into larger group
affairs, (with a balloon-festooned table to sign up for the Master
course), that distinction would be less. I'd think the rehash aspect of
Masters must be more obvious to students who took the basic course that
way.


>
> I can't verify the business aspects of Eldon's post, but the account of
> the course is quite accurate. If you're looking for a greater
> understanding of Avatar, I suggest you look elsewhere.

Thanks for your comments. I'm still awaiting any specific corrections
to the information about the information on licensing and business
prospects. If anything is inaccurate, I would like to know.

Alrick

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Dec 17, 2005, 6:22:06 AM12/17/05
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Eldonbraun wrote:
> >
> > > Here is a preliminary draft of an addition that will soon go on the web
> > > at www.avatarscam.com/. It is intended to add a "Consumer Reports"
> > > analysis of the Avatar Master course, mainly from the viewpoint of the
> > > course's potential as a business opportunity.
> >
> > > My invitation to comment and correct naturally includes Star's Edge,
> > > although you'll have to be specific for a change. Some documentation
> > > wouldn't hurt either.

Well I think its well written; and it lists all the reasons why one
shouldnt do the Masters Course. It should be posted on sites that can
be found on Google though. Im willing to post it in the Freedom of Mind
newsgroup with your permission.

One comment I have is that one is left wondering why would one do the
Course at all. Arent there any minor benefits? That would make it easy
for people to dismiss this as the work of one fanatic, dont you agree?
Therefore you should maybe include comments from people like Barbara or
Jojo to corroborate these statements!

You mention documentation; and I for one would like to see some
percentages; after 2 years, X percentage of people are making money as
a Master, after 5 years Y percentage.

Furthermore maybe you should emphasize that it is recommended that
students payments to Masters should take the form of liquidity and not
any other form. I heard that the latter form can lead to great problems
and huge difficulties with AvatarHQ.

Eldonbraun

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Dec 17, 2005, 7:20:39 AM12/17/05
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Alrick wrote:
> Eldonbraun wrote:
> > >
> > > > Here is a preliminary draft of an addition that will soon go on the web
> > > > at www.avatarscam.com/. It is intended to add a "Consumer Reports"
> > > > analysis of the Avatar Master course, mainly from the viewpoint of the
> > > > course's potential as a business opportunity.
> > >
> > > > My invitation to comment and correct naturally includes Star's Edge,
> > > > although you'll have to be specific for a change. Some documentation
> > > > wouldn't hurt either.
>
> Well I think its well written; and it lists all the reasons why one
> shouldnt do the Masters Course. It should be posted on sites that can
> be found on Google though. Im willing to post it in the Freedom of Mind
> newsgroup with your permission.
Sure. You're welcome to post it anywhere you wish AFTER it is complete.
I am still making minor revisions, and I only want the final version
spread around. This is preliminary, for comments, remember? Limited
distribution so far. The deadline for comments and corrections is
approaching. In fact, it is midnight, tomorrow night, Paris time. That
is 5 pm Florida time. Either post them or e-mail me by then. I am going
to make final revisions Monday and then Ronald will web the sucker.

>
> One comment I have is that one is left wondering why would one do the
> Course at all. Arent there any minor benefits? That would make it easy
> for people to dismiss this as the work of one fanatic, dont you agree?
No, I don't agree. I am asking them to check it out for themselves.
Call Avatar Masters. Ask SE for copies of the contracts. Verify claims.
Then make an informed decision. Who's the one fanatic? V? Myself?
Ronald?

> Therefore you should maybe include comments from people like Barbara or
> Jojo to corroborate these statements!
Good idea. V's narrative is pretty long, and I want to include it in
full, verbatim of course. But heck, it's going on a website, so linked
extra pages are easy enough to include. More testimonials are easy to
add later, too. Isn't the Internet wonderful? Dontcha just love it?
Don't cults just hate it?

Which reminds me... Hey, Hari and Wayne, how are you coming along with
Avra's little repetitive sadist process, "Why do I hate myself?" Hmmm?
Are some of those little entities in your heads repeating the question,
too? Good! They can run it with you simultaneously. Maybe they can sing
it in harmony for your entertainment, huh? Anyway, y'all continue,
hear?


>
> You mention documentation; and I for one would like to see some
> percentages; after 2 years, X percentage of people are making money as
> a Master, after 5 years Y percentage.

So would I. That's why I told people to ask for these percentages. If
Star's Edge can provide some figures with documentation, I would be
happy to include them. However, the numbers must be verifiable. I'm
still waiting to see the group shot of the last Master course Wayne
promised to post after Hari claimed there were more than 600 NEW
students. So including reviewers, how many were there in total? Must
have been a huge crowd.


>
> Furthermore maybe you should emphasize that it is recommended that
> students payments to Masters should take the form of liquidity and not
> any other form. I heard that the latter form can lead to great problems
> and huge difficulties with AvatarHQ.

I don't have any specific accounts of that, just a few random comments
people made, like Daku (Dave Gardener) posting about trading a place to
have the course for tuition. However, the law (in virtually every
country worldwide) is that "Avatar Masters can charge whatever they
want." They are independent business people, licensed to use course
materials from Star's Edge. So if they want to do barter arrangements,
no probema in legal terms that I know of.

Eldonbraun

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Dec 17, 2005, 7:36:00 AM12/17/05
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Here is a comment for people who do want to deliver Avatar for a
living. I find it far harsher than anything I've said. I received this
by e-mail from a Master in the US who is not happy with the way things
are going, but apparently wishes to remain licensed and therefore asked
to remain anonymous.

Harry, can you refute any of this?

-------------------
Eldon,

Let's say we're doing a Consumer's Report on the Avatar Masters Course.

1. The Avatar Masters Course is not geared in any way at this point to
send course graduates out to deliver the course as evidenced by:

a: No current Master's course graduates are given a license to
deliver at the end of the course.

b: Master's course graduates must undergo an internship at their
own expense (said expenses are not accounted for in the Master's
course).

c: There is no way of knowing how many courses an interning master
must attend in order to complete their internship. The criteria is
absolutely subjective.

d: Star's Edge can revoke a license at any time and is now doing so
with more frequency than anytime before. They're now pulling licenses
of masters who have decided to sell other self-improvement courses.

e: Star's Edge is no longer encouraging masters to deliver in their
own home. Instead, deliveries are held at international courses.
Masters must incur the travel, hotel, restaurant and interning expense
(all masters regardless of their status are "inspired" to intern).

Isn't this a mack truck that we can drive right through the premise of
a "Masters Course."? It is not what it is said to be. It is the
opposite; an enslavement course where people are chumped into the
slogan of working for an Enlightened Planetary Civilization by being on
the Avatar
Path.

And last but not least; it is not a profitable proposition for at least
95% of the Master Course enrollees.

Let Harry refute any of this.

Best,
(Name)

Alrick

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Dec 17, 2005, 10:48:37 AM12/17/05
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So a Master can charge students in blowjobs, is that what you're saying?

Eldonbraun

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Dec 17, 2005, 11:05:09 AM12/17/05
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Alrick wrote:

> So a Master can charge students in blowjobs, is that what you're saying?

Oh, no. I don't think that would be allowed within ANY psychology
board's Code of Ethics. But for instance, if someone wanted to trade
office work or real estate or a used car, sure. That is covered. You
can look it up. It just can't get into personal relationships. There
have to be professional boundaries regarding transference and so forth.


Of course, that French Avatar Master --Frederic Beaudry I think was the
spelling-- who was a yoga instructor before Avatar, used to seduce most
of his female students, but that wasn't economic, just hypnotic. He
only dressed in white, you see. But his real problem was tax evasion
for collecting all the course fees in cash. Boy, did the French
government come down on him! Bango!

Of course, we could get theoretical about it. If a Dutch Avatar student
owned a little storefront in the red-or-pink-light district of
Amsterdam, and traded the Avatar Master blowjob services from an
employee for the course, would that be indiscreet in Holland? What do
you think? I mean, it's just a service for a service, but not a
personal relationship. Hell, if they paid their taxes, would the Dutch
government care? I doubt it. Practical people, you Dutch.

Barbara

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Dec 17, 2005, 11:43:32 AM12/17/05
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In article <1134813828.4...@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
Eldonbraun <Eldo...@aol.com> wrote:

> > Barbara wrote:

> > The promised "look behind the scenes" never happened. There was
> > nothing that led to a deeper understanding of the primary processes.
> > (A group of people acting out the CHP like a grade school skit was fun,
> > but not particularly profound.) I was extremely disappointed.

> One former Avatar Master (Mieke from Holland) said the group dynamic
> effect was a big factor, which would make a difference between a small
> and a larger course. I guess that didn't bite for you.

My Avatar course had 18 students (two Masters), so the dynamic was
approaching a larger course. You could do the processes with many
different people, which was a valuable experience. Plus, the ratio of
9:1 (Master:student) meant that access was good for resolving problems
and the environment was very stable. If someone asked me for a
recommendation, I would try to direct them to a medium sized group.
Unfortunately, those are very difficult to find.

The Masters course had approx. 300 people, with roughly 150 repeaters.
At times it seemed chaotic. Many of the trainers were there for the
first time. They were stuck in their own personal version of the TV
show, "The Apprentice" (with Avra in Donald Trump's part). So there
were two levels operating there: (1) students wishing to get licensed;
and (2) apprentice trainers wishing to be come permanent trainers.

From a learning perspective, I never believed that Large Group = Best
The mass psychology of a large group is easier to manipulate. But the
most compelling reason for SE to do large groups is economy of scale.
Tuition - Expenses (profit) is much higher PER STUDENT for a big group.

Barbara

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Dec 17, 2005, 11:50:41 AM12/17/05
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In article <171220050843322324%bpja...@rushpost.com>, Barbara
<bpja...@rushpost.com> wrote:

> Plus, the ratio of 9:1 (Master:student) meant that access was good
> for resolving problems and the environment was very stable.

Correction. The above sentence should read:

Plus, the ratio of 9:1 (students:Master) meant that access was good


for resolving problems and the environment was very stable.

IIRC, the ratio on my Masters was 30:1 (students:trainer).

Eldonbraun

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Dec 17, 2005, 1:01:21 PM12/17/05
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Barbara wrote:
> In article <171220050843322324%bpja...@rushpost.com>, Barbara
> <bpja...@rushpost.com> wrote:
>
> > Plus, the ratio of 9:1 (Master:student) meant that access was good
> > for resolving problems and the environment was very stable.
>
> Correction. The above sentence should read:
>
> Plus, the ratio of 9:1 (students:Master) meant that access was good
> for resolving problems and the environment was very stable.
Thanks. The typo you made was obvious anyway. But I agree with you.
There is an optimum course size, as well as an optimum price point for
the course according to the size of the group.

Students may differ, and some might do better getting therapy on a
one-to-one basis from a professional. That is not the Avatar course
anyway, but it is a 1:1 ratio that is necessary sometimes. This is one
of the reasons price fixing regulations have been in force for so many
years. That system is pretty well worked out and tested, even if Star's
Edge doesn't recognize it. On an individual basis, prices are
negotiable. So shop around.

Most prospective students may get something out of a large-scale
gangbang "Large Group Awareness Training" like the current
International Avatar Course or Master course, or a Landmark event.
Well, at least if they're not among the minority who are shamed and
shunned and humiliated in order to intimidate the rest of the crowd.

That's a sleazy, manipulative trick that needs to be stopped. And do
you know how I'm gonna do it?

Well, it's a major copyrighted trade sekrit, but if you really BEG me
and ADULATE me and WORSHIP me... and send me a big fat PayPal payment,
maybe I'll tell you.

(five minute pause) Why Barbara, how fast your telepathy works! All the
way to Paris almost instantaneously and more than $7,500 in my PayPal
account. OK, here's the magikal sekrit, but don't share it, OK?

We're just going to tell everybody that nobody with mental health
problems or vulnerabilities should take a large group gangbang program.
Landmark makes this pretty clear, because they got burned so many times
and settled out of court for some pretty big bucks. We're going to make
it perfectly clear what people get when they decide to become Avatar
"Masters" as disciples of the FRAUDULENT, FAKE, NONEXISTENT
"educational psychologist" from Florida who licenses uneducated quacks
to practice witchcraft under the authority of his teaching system.

Think that might sort of sum it up? I'm working on the language, but I
think I'm getting it narrowed down pretty closely. We need to make it
precise in these cases, you know.

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