please help with OST and PST files

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Newbie Tech

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Feb 20, 2002, 10:53:05 PM2/20/02
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At my new job they told me that they use PST files for Outlook but are
moving to OST files. From my understanding, OST saves to your HD and synchs
with what is on the server and PST file is a file that is on your computer
that doesn't synch. What are the benefits/disadvantages of both?

Also, they told me that because many people use PST files, *all* of their
e-mail is only on their laptops and not on the server anymore. Can this
really be the case? Why would somebody in a company want their e-mail to
*only* reside on their laptop, especially if the laptops are never backed
up. I'm confused. Is it possible to have PST or OST files on a laptop
while keeping their e-mail on the company server? Thanks for your help.


Marshall R. Madole

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Feb 20, 2002, 11:16:04 PM2/20/02
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well, you don't mention what your email server is. We have Exchange and we
have a limit set on how much email they can store on the server. The PST is
a Personal Folder File where they can store mail items (overflow for lack of
a better term) and we have the users keep their PST files in a Userhome
directory on one of the servers where it is backed up, never on the users
system. The OST or Offline File Folder, basically mirrors what is stored on
the email server. The reason for the OST file is if you are not connected
to the mail server, you can still work while offline by composing or
responding to messages. Once you connect with the email server, your
composed messages will be sent and the OST file will be again synched with
the email server.

I cannot imagine a company making users keep their PST on the local system
except that they want the user to have access to the email or they were
short on space on the server. If nothing else, I would store my PST on the
server and make a copy to my local drive. If my hard drive goes south, then
a copy still exists on the server.

--
Marshall R. Madole
MCSE, CNA, A+, Net+, INet+


"Newbie Tech" <nos...@nospam.com> wrote in message
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Newbie Tech

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Feb 21, 2002, 7:57:30 AM2/21/02
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It's an Exchange Server. Thanks for the information.


"Marshall R. Madole" <mars...@madole.com> wrote in message
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Grant Schmarr

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Feb 22, 2002, 1:23:53 AM2/22/02
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On Thu, 21 Feb 2002 19:18:14 -0800, mhaase-at-springmind.com
<mhaase-at-springmind.com@> wrote:

>On Wed, 20 Feb 2002 20:16:04 -0800, "Marshall R. Madole"
><mars...@madole.com> wrote:
>

>>I cannot imagine a company making users keep their PST on the local system
>>except that they want the user to have access to the email or they were
>>short on space on the server. If nothing else, I would store my PST on the
>>server and make a copy to my local drive. If my hard drive goes south, then
>>a copy still exists on the server.
>
>

>Marshall,
>
>Just out of curiosity, if you have a limit on the amount users can
>store on the server, why do you then have them store the PST files on
>the server?

Some organisations have client home drives located on one server and mail
residing on another server. Free space on the mail server may be at a premium
but there might be much more free disk space on the server containing a user's
home drive (allowing for the fact that some user's are pack rats and save
everything).

Also, earlier versions of Exchange had limits to the size of the Information
Store (private folders (user mailboxes), public folders etc) - eg 16GBs total
size. One organisation I worked for limited the size of user mailboxes and
encouraged the use of personal folders on client home drives (one user ended up
with multiple PST files totalling 6GB). Once every six months we would compact
the Exchange Information Store to free up space (some messages when deleted did
not return the space to OS unless the Information Store was compacted). One time
I did a compaction on a 12GB Information store which ended up being 4GB post
compaction.


Cya
Grant Schmarr A+ I-NET+ Network+ CIW MCIWA MCIWD

Marshall R. Madole

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Feb 22, 2002, 6:20:33 PM2/22/02
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When you have 500+ users each having email mailboxes with anywhere between 1
to 700 MB, you will understand. As stated by another poster, space can be
at a premium, backups take longer and why backup email that is 2 years old
or older and haven't been read in awhile, especially if the user is a
packrat. Exchange server stores messages in a database. If users started
deleting emails, the database does not get smaller, because the deleted
emails create something known as White Space. In order to reclaim the
space, a compaction of the database is needed and in order to do that, the
email has to be taken offline. The larger the database, the longer the
compaction. Exchange 5.0 and earlier had a 16GB limit for email, so you
either had to limit the users mailboxes or setup another server.

--
Marshall R. Madole
MCSE, CNA, A+, Net+, INet+


"mhaase-at-springmind.com" <mhaase-at-springmind.com@> wrote in message
news:psdb7u4637k81tcm4...@4ax.com...


> On Wed, 20 Feb 2002 20:16:04 -0800, "Marshall R. Madole"
> <mars...@madole.com> wrote:
>

> Marshall,
>
> Just out of curiosity, if you have a limit on the amount users can
> store on the server, why do you then have them store the PST files on
> the server?
>

> I thought I read somewhere that PST files actually take up more room
> than the equivalent data in the Exchange server, anyway.
>
> No flame intended...just wondering if I'm missing something.
>
> Mark
>
>
>
>
> I resisted 'till I couldn't take it anymore.
>
> (sigh) Address altered against Spam.
>
> Replace the -at- and put the "spring-mind" in the correct order
>
>
>

phil29gi...@gmail.com

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Dec 29, 2013, 7:46:00 PM12/29/13
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You may easy make use ost to pst conversion owing to Recovery Toolbox for Outlook.

See more at http://www.osttopst.recoverytoolbox.com/

jeramy...@gmail.com

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Apr 25, 2014, 8:09:05 AM4/25/14
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Recover Data for Outlook convert ost to pst file Outlook and can do the following:

- tool compatible and recovery data from PST files of Outlook 97-2013
- fixes data corruption problems in MS Outlook folders, caused by invalid user activities
- restores damaged folders in several mouse clicks and converts repaired information into clean files of pst format

Source: http://www.recoverdatatools.com/ost-to-pst-converter-software.html
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