Windows 98SE reading and saving to NTFS partition!

2 views
Skip to first unread message

Tony Sivori

unread,
Sep 21, 2002, 2:22:18 PM9/21/02
to
I have a pair of dual boot machines running Windows 2000 and Windows 98SE.
They are networked via a hub and fast Ethernet running TCP/IP.

One machine default boots 2000 (hereafter referred to as "the 2000 machine",
the other default boots 98SE (hereafter referred to as "the 98SE machine").

Both machines were 100% FAT 32 partitions until recently when, to make it
easier to learn about NTFS permissions and security, I converted one small
partition on the 2000 machine to NTFS. The partition converted to NTFS was
not the boot partition, and is not the partition that 2000 is installed to.

After using the Windows 2000 disk manager to convert the partition to NTFS,
the partition is indeed reported as NTFS and lots of new options shows under
permissions. Just to see what the error message looked like I tried to
access the NTFS partition via the network from the 98SE machine. Much to my
surprise, I am able read and write to the NTFS partition from Windows 98SE.
I thought this was supposed to be impossible, at least without third party
software.

Anyone have a clue as to what is going on here? Why is 98SE able to read and
write to the NTFS partition? The possibilities that I am considering are:
1. Perhaps because the 2000 machine boots from a FAT 32 partition, and
resides on a FAT 32 partition?
2. Perhaps the 98SE machine can read NTFS because it is a dual boot machine?
3. Perhaps it is due to the partition being converted from FAT 32, instead
of originally being NTFS?

I tried Google and had no luck as to resolving this puzzle, so any
information or insights would be much appreciated.

--
Tony Sivori


wanabe

unread,
Sep 21, 2002, 2:32:44 PM9/21/02
to
This has always been the case! I know we are told that 98 can't "see" an
ntfs partition on the same computer and thats right, but over a network you
can
"Tony Sivori" <TonyS...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:amid7o$66q9d$1...@ID-140514.news.dfncis.de...

Douglas Brown

unread,
Sep 21, 2002, 2:53:26 PM9/21/02
to
Point your attention toward the presentation layer of the OSI, redirector
etc....somewhere there, you may find your answer.

"Tony Sivori" <TonyS...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:amid7o$66q9d$1...@ID-140514.news.dfncis.de...

JimW

unread,
Sep 21, 2002, 2:58:38 PM9/21/02
to
The 98 machine talks to the 2000 OS over the network -- the 2000 OS writes to the NTFS

"Tony Sivori" <TonyS...@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:amid7o$66q9d$1...@ID-140514.news.dfncis.de...

MCSEwannabe

unread,
Sep 21, 2002, 3:00:27 PM9/21/02
to
"Tony Sivori" <TonyS...@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Anyone have a clue as to what is going on here? Why is 98SE able to
> read and write to the NTFS partition?

because it's not the W98 machine that's reading/writing to the NTFS
partition. The W2000 machine is doing the disk access and sending the data
over the network to the W98 machine.

This is a rather common misconception that needlessly scares a lot of
people away from NTFS. The only time to be concerned is when you are dual-
booting W98 and W2000 on the same physical PC and you need to access the
W2000 data while running W98.

Tom MacIntyre

unread,
Sep 21, 2002, 3:28:10 PM9/21/02
to

...and there are utilities that get past this problem as well.

Tom

Tony Sivori

unread,
Sep 21, 2002, 4:55:37 PM9/21/02
to
wanabe <wan...@wanabe.net> wrote:
> This has always been the case! I know we are told that 98 can't "see"
> an ntfs partition on the same computer and thats right, but over a
> network you can

Thanks for the info. I wasn't aware of that exception. Today was a good day;
I learned something both new, and practical. :-)

--
Tony Sivori

Barry Watzman

unread,
Sep 21, 2002, 10:29:38 PM9/21/02
to
Keep in mind that a server can be running a totally different OS and you
can still access the drive. As long as you do it over a network, if
compatible protocols are installed, any machine can see (and read/write,
presuming that the appropriate permissions are granted) the hard drive
of any other machine on the network. This includes not only the
Microsoft partitions [of any type] but, just as a few examples,
non-Microsoft storage devices including HPFS [OS/2], Apple, Novel and
Unix, among others.
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages