BB Foodie Division--hotdogs

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den...@tanstaafl.zipcon.net.invalid

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Jul 25, 2002, 6:52:27 AM7/25/02
to
This being July, early in the month we got the reports about the
Nathan's hotdog eating contest. This, combined with a couple other
things, gave me a major jones for GOOD hotdogs. Now, living in
Seattle, one available option is The Frankfurter--they have great
dogs. But I wanted something to fix at home.

So. T'other day, I found packages of "Nathan's Famous"--they're very
tasty. But what I'd like to know is this: Has anyone familiar with
the *real* Nathan's tried the packaged ones? Do they compare?

I've never been to NY, and likely never will get there. Though such
things as Nathan's etc are tempting.

Second half of question: Tell me (us, really) about your favorite
hotdogs--either the sausages/franks you like, or the dogs from your
favorite stand.

I mentioned Seattle's local chain, The Frankfurter--they use some
excellent sausages, and do a *good* dog. My favorite is the kielbasa.
Though the kosher dog is very close.

Oh--I also have a candidate for 'most disappointing': I tried some
Johnsonville brats. Ate two, tossed the other two from the pkg of 4.
Yeck. (though it probably is a MV situation, there.)

--
dennyw

"A patriot must always be ready to defend his country
against his government."
- Edward Abbey (1927-1989)
US author

LeAnne

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Jul 25, 2002, 3:03:04 PM7/25/02
to
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote:
>
> This being July, early in the month we got the reports about the
> Nathan's hotdog eating contest. This, combined with a couple other
> things, gave me a major jones for GOOD hotdogs. Now, living in
> Seattle, one available option is The Frankfurter--they have great
> dogs. But I wanted something to fix at home.
>
> So. T'other day, I found packages of "Nathan's Famous"--they're very
> tasty. But what I'd like to know is this: Has anyone familiar with
> the *real* Nathan's tried the packaged ones? Do they compare?
>
> I've never been to NY, and likely never will get there. Though such
> things as Nathan's etc are tempting.
>
> Second half of question: Tell me (us, really) about your favorite
> hotdogs--either the sausages/franks you like, or the dogs from your
> favorite stand.
>
> I mentioned Seattle's local chain, The Frankfurter--they use some
> excellent sausages, and do a *good* dog. My favorite is the kielbasa.
> Though the kosher dog is very close.
>
> Oh--I also have a candidate for 'most disappointing': I tried some
> Johnsonville brats. Ate two, tossed the other two from the pkg of 4.
> Yeck. (though it probably is a MV situation, there.)
>
> --

I have very strong preferences for certain regional variations of the
basic dog:

Top Dog: Hungarian hot dog with chili, onions, mustard and
pickles'n'peppers from Tony Packo's in Toledo, Ohio

Best Michigan Coney: Athens Coney Island, Woodward Ave., Birmingham MI.

Best Flint-style coney: Halo Burger in Flint, MI. The coney sauce for
Flint-style is a little meatier than elsewhere in MI.

Best Chicago-style dog: Dog Eat Dog in Madison, WI (Chicago dogs are
topped with neon green dill relish, tomatoes, onions, mustard, and a
sprinkling of carroway or poppy seeds)

Best West Coast dog: Burrito Dog from Pink's in LA (Tail o' the Pup's
dogs aren't that great, but you have to eat there for the nostalgia
value)

Best Southern Dog: LOTS of choices. The Varsity Grill in Athens and
Atlanta, GA has super dogs. There are a large number of good places
scattered around the NC Research Triangle (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill)
and the I-85 corridor (Greenville, Winston-Salem, Salisbury, Lexington)
towards Charlotte. Also the Barbecue Inn in Asheville, NC (NC is also
well-known for its BBQ). Southern dogs usually are topped with chili,
mustard, onions, and cole slaw.

Best PA dog: Texas Tommy, usually found in old classic PA diners off the
beaten path. The dog is split, a hunk of American cheese is inserted in
the split, the whole dog is then wrapped in bacon and deep-fried, and
finally served on a buttered slab of Texas toast. A cholesterol orgasm!

Best NY Dog: Nathan's, of course!

PS. Watch your local PBS channel for "A Hot Dog Show" (yes, that's the
title)! It's a hoot!

LeAnne, getting seriously hungry now...

sfw

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Jul 25, 2002, 5:07:22 PM7/25/02
to
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote:
> Second half of question: Tell me (us, really) about your favorite
> hotdogs--either the sausages/franks you like, or the dogs from your
> favorite stand.

Can't answer the first part. However... HOT DOGS!

Ok, I live in DC now. But I grew up in Rochester, NY. Home of
delicious yummy Zweigel's Hot Dogs. Now, you have to get the Texas
Style ones - none of that skinless stuff. But both their red hots and
their white hots are just most delicious.

http://www.zweigles.com/

I used to go to the hot dog stand at Sibley's downtown to eat white hots
with fries and freezies. Sibley's is now long gone. A sad loss.

One of the only flaws of "A Hot Dog Program" was that it didn't have
Rochester Hot Dogs.

http://www.wqed.org/tv/natl/hotdogs/index.html

White hots, with Nance's hot mustard, ketchup and onions. Eat them at
Sibley's, at a BBQ, or at a Rochester Red Wings Game.
http://www.redwingsbaseball.com/ Oh, they're so good. Can't get a
proper dog here at all. The closest I've found is the Chili Dogs at
Ben's Chili Bowl http://www.benschilibowl.com/ They're good, but
nothing will ever top a good white hot.

Sarah

Margaret Whittleton

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Jul 25, 2002, 6:39:28 PM7/25/02
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Ah yes - White hots - my favourites - we go to a m/c rally at Watkins
Glen on Labour Day. The Finger Lakes BMW Club always has a set up for
hot dogs - red and whites...., but the whites are definately the way to
go.

Marg

LaughSong

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Jul 25, 2002, 10:06:17 PM7/25/02
to
Sarah wrote

> Can't get a
> proper dog here at all. The closest I've found is the Chili Dogs at
> Ben's Chili Bowl http://www.benschilibowl.com/

Wow, who'd've guessed The Bowl would have a website?

Anyway, Denny, I don't think the packaged Nathan's dogs are as good as
the real thing -- but I don't even thing the dogs at the Nathan's
stand in BWI airport are as good as the real thing. You have to go to
Coney Island for the ultimate hot dog experience. I suspect the sand
and seawater and midway aromas have something to do with the taste of
the hot dogs. Mmmmmmmmmmmm...

I also enjoy Sabrett's from various streetcorner stands in NYC, and
sometimes even here in Washington.

-LaughSong

sfw

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Jul 25, 2002, 10:28:00 PM7/25/02
to
LaughSong wrote:
>
> Sarah wrote
> > Can't get a
> > proper dog here at all. The closest I've found is the Chili Dogs at
> > Ben's Chili Bowl http://www.benschilibowl.com/
>
> Wow, who'd've guessed The Bowl would have a website?

I note that I did not find a website for the Vienna Inn - the DH's
favorite local chili dogs.

Sarah

The TheatrElf

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Jul 25, 2002, 11:28:59 PM7/25/02
to
And it came to pass that wrote:

> So. T'other day, I found packages of "Nathan's
> Famous"--they're very tasty. But what I'd like to know is
> this: Has anyone familiar with the *real* Nathan's tried
> the packaged ones? Do they compare?
>
> I've never been to NY, and likely never will get there.
> Though such things as Nathan's etc are tempting.
>

Nathan's are OK, but I'm a Sabrette's man myself.

Nathans' Famous are grilling dogs where Sabrette's are steamed
dogs. It's the Sabrette's that you used to get from the street-
corner cart. Nathan's you had to trek off to a stand
somewheres.

I liked the steaming hot wiener on a soft, warm bun. Mustard,
onion and relish, wash down with an icy cold can of Coke.
Heaven!!

--
}:-) Christopher Jahn
{:-( Dionysian Reveler

Save the whales! Collect the whole set!

To reply: chrisjahn AT MyRealBox.com

J. Jasper

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Jul 25, 2002, 11:54:08 PM7/25/02
to

The TheatrElf wrote:
>
> And it came to pass that wrote:
>
> > So. T'other day, I found packages of "Nathan's
> > Famous"--they're very tasty. But what I'd like to know is
> > this: Has anyone familiar with the *real* Nathan's tried
> > the packaged ones? Do they compare?
> >
> > I've never been to NY, and likely never will get there.
> > Though such things as Nathan's etc are tempting.
> >
>
> Nathan's are OK, but I'm a Sabrette's man myself.
>
> Nathans' Famous are grilling dogs where Sabrette's are steamed
> dogs. It's the Sabrette's that you used to get from the street-
> corner cart. Nathan's you had to trek off to a stand
> somewheres.
>
> I liked the steaming hot wiener on a soft, warm bun. Mustard,
> onion and relish, wash down with an icy cold can of Coke.
> Heaven!!
>

I tend to go with mustard and sauerkraut myself. Mmmm...

Magister

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Jul 26, 2002, 12:07:03 AM7/26/02
to
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote in message news:<tilvjugrom592iji5...@4ax.com>...

> This being July, early in the month we got the reports about the
> Nathan's hotdog eating contest. This, combined with a couple other
> things, gave me a major jones for GOOD hotdogs. Now, living in
> Seattle, one available option is The Frankfurter--they have great
> dogs. But I wanted something to fix at home.

Have you ever heard of "Hebrew National"? They're kosher hotdogs...and
the BEST I've EVER had, bar none! No fillers, no nasty aftertaste.
They come in two sizes, regular and dinner franks (the bigger one). I
love their slogan.."We answer to a higher authority" (tm)

> Second half of question: Tell me (us, really) about your favorite
> hotdogs--either the sausages/franks you like, or the dogs from your
> favorite stand.

I can't think of any one favorite hotdog stand, but the best advice I
ever heard about hotdogs came from Dennis the Menace:

"A hotdog just don't taste right without a baseball game in front of
it!"

Safeco Field...Yum.


> Oh--I also have a candidate for 'most disappointing': I tried some
> Johnsonville brats. Ate two, tossed the other two from the pkg of 4.
> Yeck. (though it probably is a MV situation, there.)

I tried 'em too, on the suggestion of the ads done by a local
talk-show host. (You're in Seattle...you may have heard Dori's ad as
well.) I grilled them...VERY disappointing.

Magister

Allan Wheeler

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Jul 26, 2002, 12:18:02 AM7/26/02
to
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote in message news:<tilvjugrom592iji5...@4ax.com>...
> This being July, early in the month we got the reports about the
> Nathan's hotdog eating contest. This, combined with a couple other
> things, gave me a major jones for GOOD hotdogs. Now, living in
> Seattle, one available option is The Frankfurter--they have great
> dogs. But I wanted something to fix at home.
>
> So. T'other day, I found packages of "Nathan's Famous"--they're very
> tasty. But what I'd like to know is this: Has anyone familiar with
> the *real* Nathan's tried the packaged ones? Do they compare?
>
> I've never been to NY, and likely never will get there. Though such
> things as Nathan's etc are tempting.
>
> Second half of question: Tell me (us, really) about your favorite
> hotdogs--either the sausages/franks you like, or the dogs from your
> favorite stand.
>
> I mentioned Seattle's local chain, The Frankfurter--they use some
> excellent sausages, and do a *good* dog. My favorite is the kielbasa.
> Though the kosher dog is very close.
>
> Oh--I also have a candidate for 'most disappointing': I tried some
> Johnsonville brats. Ate two, tossed the other two from the pkg of 4.
> Yeck. (though it probably is a MV situation, there.)

Did you simmer the Brats in beer before cooking? This improves them
remarkably. Fill a kettle with beer (any cheap brand) ddep enough to
simmer the brats for about 1-2 hours. Then grill them. This removes
much of the fat, and garauntees that they are thouroughly cooked. It
improves them enough to qualify as food for the Gods.

Al

den...@tanstaafl.zipcon.net.invalid

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Jul 26, 2002, 5:40:25 AM7/26/02
to
On Thu, 25 Jul 2002 15:03:04 -0400, LeAnne
<lastin_N...@icprb.org> held forth, saying:

>PS. Watch your local PBS channel for "A Hot Dog Show" (yes, that's the
>title)! It's a hoot!

There was a great series of three shows on Discovery a week or so ago;
pizza, dogs, burgers, KFC, Chinese, Mexican, etc etc. <drool!>

den...@tanstaafl.zipcon.net.invalid

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Jul 26, 2002, 5:44:58 AM7/26/02
to
On 25 Jul 2002 21:18:02 -0700, alwh...@voyager.net (Allan Wheeler)
held forth, saying:

>den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote in message news:<tilvjugrom592iji5...@4ax.com>...

>> Oh--I also have a candidate for 'most disappointing': I tried some
>> Johnsonville brats. Ate two, tossed the other two from the pkg of 4.
>> Yeck. (though it probably is a MV situation, there.)
>
>Did you simmer the Brats in beer before cooking? This improves them
>remarkably. Fill a kettle with beer (any cheap brand) ddep enough to
>simmer the brats for about 1-2 hours. Then grill them. This removes
>much of the fat, and garauntees that they are thouroughly cooked. It
>improves them enough to qualify as food for the Gods.
>
>Al

Nope. Didn't do that. Won't go to the trouble and expense, either.

PS--for Seattle folk: I'm told that the butcher shop on QA Hill
(corner of McGraw and QA Avenue) has some great sausages. I've not
tried 'em though.

den...@tanstaafl.zipcon.net.invalid

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Jul 26, 2002, 5:47:41 AM7/26/02
to
On 25 Jul 2002 21:07:03 -0700, mag...@att.net (Magister) held forth,
saying:

>Have you ever heard of "Hebrew National"? They're kosher hotdogs...and
>the BEST I've EVER had, bar none! No fillers, no nasty aftertaste.
>They come in two sizes, regular and dinner franks (the bigger one). I
>love their slogan.."We answer to a higher authority" (tm)

Yup. I know they're good--haven't tried 'em yet. The 'Canadian
Jumbos' you get some places in town are fair.

My biggest (only, I guess) gripe about the Nathan's dogs is that
they're skinless. I just have a strong preference for biting into a
dog and having it *pop* and spurt some juice.

Next pack of dogs I buy will likely be Hebrew Nationals.

Jette Goldie

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Jul 26, 2002, 1:54:01 PM7/26/02
to

"Magister" <mag...@att.net> wrote

> I can't think of any one favorite hotdog stand, but the best advice I
> ever heard about hotdogs came from Dennis the Menace:
>
> "A hotdog just don't taste right without a baseball game in front of
> it!"


Hmmm, must be a completely different Dennis the
Menace to the one I grew up with - our Dennis never
saw a baseball game in his puff!

(he'd probably call it a *sissy* game)

<g>


--
Jette
(aka Vinyaduriel)
"Work for Peace and remain fiercely loving" - Jim Byrnes
je...@blueyonder.co.uk
http://www.jette.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/
http://bosslady.tripod.com/fanfic.html


Jette Goldie

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Jul 26, 2002, 1:54:01 PM7/26/02
to

"sfw" <s...@dork.com> wrote in message news:3D40688A...@dork.com...

> den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote:
> > Second half of question: Tell me (us, really) about your favorite
> > hotdogs--either the sausages/franks you like, or the dogs from your
> > favorite stand.
>
> Can't answer the first part. However... HOT DOGS!
>
> Ok, I live in DC now. But I grew up in Rochester, NY. Home of
> delicious yummy Zweigel's Hot Dogs. Now, you have to get the Texas
> Style ones - none of that skinless stuff. But both their red hots and
> their white hots are just most delicious.


I live in Scotland and hotdogs are limp, soggy, tasteless
pink things served in a soggy bun with soggy onions.


First trip to the US I discovered that
1) hot dogs aren't always like that
2) they can be grilled instead of just heated to
lukewarm temperature in salty water.
3) I LIKE hot dogs - well, I like the ones I get
in the US.

My hostess started to make jokes about how
we had to stop at every hot dog stall so I could
try a different kind. In San Francisco I was taken
to a speciality hot dog/sausage take-away in
the university area. Mmmmm!

:-)

sfw

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Jul 26, 2002, 3:32:21 PM7/26/02
to
Jette Goldie wrote:
>
> "Magister" <mag...@att.net> wrote
> > I can't think of any one favorite hotdog stand, but the best advice I
> > ever heard about hotdogs came from Dennis the Menace:
> >
> > "A hotdog just don't taste right without a baseball game in front of
> > it!"
>
> Hmmm, must be a completely different Dennis the
> Menace to the one I grew up with - our Dennis never
> saw a baseball game in his puff!
>
> (he'd probably call it a *sissy* game)

Well, I believe that the quote is actually from Charlie Brown, in
Peanuts.

I'm assuming your Dennis the Menace is something other than the comic?
And, "In his puff"? Definition please?

Sarah

Jette Goldie

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Jul 26, 2002, 3:38:43 PM7/26/02
to

"sfw" <s...@dork.com> wrote in message news:3D41A3C5...@dork.com...

Dennis the Menace is indeed from a comic
book - The Dandy, published in Dundee by
D C Thomson. Nasty little boy with shaggy
black hair, striped sweater and a nasty shaggy
black dog called Gnasher. Dennis spends
his time beating up "sissy" boys (nerds/geeks)
and destroying things - and then being spanked
by his father. Or rather he did when I was a kid
- he may have been "cleaned up" for the modern
era.

"in his puff" - Scottish slang for "in his life".

sfw

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Jul 26, 2002, 3:56:30 PM7/26/02
to
Jette Goldie wrote:
> "sfw" <s...@dork.com> wrote in message news:3D41A3C5...@dork.com...
> > I'm assuming your Dennis the Menace is something other than the comic?

> Dennis the Menace is indeed from a comic


> book - The Dandy, published in Dundee by
> D C Thomson. Nasty little boy with shaggy
> black hair, striped sweater and a nasty shaggy
> black dog called Gnasher. Dennis spends
> his time beating up "sissy" boys (nerds/geeks)
> and destroying things - and then being spanked
> by his father. Or rather he did when I was a kid
> - he may have been "cleaned up" for the modern
> era.

Ah. Ok, ours is a far too cutesy newspaper comic panel. Like,
nauseatingly sweet. Here:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/comics/king.htm?name=Dennis_The_Menace

Oh, and thanks for the definition!

Sarah

Andreas Schaefer

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Jul 26, 2002, 4:23:25 PM7/26/02
to
On Fri, 26 Jul 2002 19:38:43 GMT, "Jette Goldie"
<j...@blueyonder.com.uk> wrote:
snip

>
>"in his puff" - Scottish slang for "in his life".

Ah thanks. As 'Puff' is German coloquial/slang for bordello I could
not quite imagine Dennis there.

Andreas

den...@tanstaafl.zipcon.net.invalid

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Jul 26, 2002, 3:54:54 PM7/26/02
to
On Fri, 26 Jul 2002 17:54:01 GMT, "Jette Goldie"
<j...@blueyonder.com.uk> held forth, saying:

>
>"sfw" <s...@dork.com> wrote in message news:3D40688A...@dork.com...
>> den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote:
>> > Second half of question: Tell me (us, really) about your favorite
>> > hotdogs--either the sausages/franks you like, or the dogs from your
>> > favorite stand.
>>
>> Can't answer the first part. However... HOT DOGS!
>>
>> Ok, I live in DC now. But I grew up in Rochester, NY. Home of
>> delicious yummy Zweigel's Hot Dogs. Now, you have to get the Texas
>> Style ones - none of that skinless stuff. But both their red hots and
>> their white hots are just most delicious.
>
>
>I live in Scotland and hotdogs are limp, soggy, tasteless
>pink things served in a soggy bun with soggy onions.
>
>
>First trip to the US I discovered that
>1) hot dogs aren't always like that
>2) they can be grilled instead of just heated to
>lukewarm temperature in salty water.
>3) I LIKE hot dogs - well, I like the ones I get
>in the US.
>
>My hostess started to make jokes about how
>we had to stop at every hot dog stall so I could
>try a different kind. In San Francisco I was taken
>to a speciality hot dog/sausage take-away in
>the university area. Mmmmm!
>
>:-)

Hm. You can get the sausages/dogs, yes? And rolls?
Got a grill? (or a broiler, or a fire, or....)
Teach your Scots friends what a hot dog should be.

I have to ask: do they deep-fry hotdogs in Glasgow?

Jette Goldie

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Jul 26, 2002, 4:42:44 PM7/26/02
to

<den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:g4a3kugl7lanursu9...@4ax.com...


NO!! But both Glasgow and Edinburgh do deep fry
"Dutch Smoked Sausage" (great with chips <g>)

Arri London

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Jul 26, 2002, 7:59:28 PM7/26/02
to

They certainly do in London. Batter-dipped first though.
Hotdogs sometimes, but saveloys more frequently; at least in
my East End neighbourhood. Strange concept but not
necessarily bad. Never served in a bun though... only on top
of the open cone of chips (fries).

Ace Lightning

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Jul 26, 2002, 9:53:19 PM7/26/02
to
Arri London wrote:
>>I have to ask: do they deep-fry hotdogs in Glasgow?
>They certainly do in London. Batter-dipped first though.

Sounds a lot like corn dogs - a Southern US delicacy,
consisting of a hot dog dipped in cornbread batter
and deep-fried.

>Hotdogs sometimes, but saveloys more frequently; at least in
>my East End neighbourhood. Strange concept but not
>necessarily bad. Never served in a bun though... only on top
>of the open cone of chips (fries)

Corn dogs are usually made by impaling the hot dog
lengthwise with a bamboo skewer before dipping them
in the batter. The purchaser holds the end of the
stick and gnaws the corn dog off, rather like eating
kebabs. Fries on the side.

(What's a saveloy?)

Allan Wheeler

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Jul 26, 2002, 11:10:48 PM7/26/02
to
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote in message news:<jd62kustvotcuvkod...@4ax.com>...

> On 25 Jul 2002 21:18:02 -0700, alwh...@voyager.net (Allan Wheeler)
> held forth, saying:
>
> >den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote in message news:<tilvjugrom592iji5...@4ax.com>...
> >> Oh--I also have a candidate for 'most disappointing': I tried some
> >> Johnsonville brats. Ate two, tossed the other two from the pkg of 4.
> >> Yeck. (though it probably is a MV situation, there.)
> >
> >Did you simmer the Brats in beer before cooking? This improves them
> >remarkably. Fill a kettle with beer (any cheap brand) ddep enough to
> >simmer the brats for about 1-2 hours. Then grill them. This removes
> >much of the fat, and garauntees that they are thouroughly cooked. It
> >improves them enough to qualify as food for the Gods.
> >
> >Al
>
> Nope. Didn't do that. Won't go to the trouble and expense, either.
>
> PS--for Seattle folk: I'm told that the butcher shop on QA Hill
> (corner of McGraw and QA Avenue) has some great sausages. I've not
> tried 'em though.

Good, it will mean more of them for us who love them.

Al

Beth Jackson

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Jul 26, 2002, 10:51:41 PM7/26/02
to
Magister:

>>I can't think of
>>any one favorite hotdog stand,
>>but the best advice I ever heard
>>about hotdogs
>>came from
>>Dennis the Menace:

;->
Well sure
-- sometimes
"outta the mouths of babes"
an' all that;>

>>"A hotdog just don't taste right
>> without a baseball game
>> in front of it!"

<g>
Yup; that sounds like Dennis, all right.
:)

Or, another "one-liner cartoon" quote:

-Dennis and his dad
are buying hotdogs
at a small hotdog-stand,
at the beach.
-Dennis is declaring
("telling" is too mild a word
for Dennis' usual style, IMO;) to the cook,
-"I want *everything* on *my* hotdog!
Including a *hamburger*!"

(I still like that one...:)


Jette Goldie:

>Hmmm,
>must be a completely different
>Dennis the Menace
>to the one I grew up with
>- our
>Dennis never saw
>a baseball game in his puff!

"His puff"??
{:-) (sounds interesting:)

>(he'd probably call it
> a *sissy* game)
><g>

<g>
Well that last part certainly does sound like the Dennis I grew up with!
;-D

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"The Canvas Canary"
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I love to paint,
I like to sing,
I have blonde hair, and
I am a little bit flighty:)

(Visit my website to see my art & me;)

http://www.angelfire.com/nc/canvascanary

Bruce Klaiss

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Jul 27, 2002, 11:13:47 AM7/27/02
to
Thus quoth "Magister" <mag...@att.net>:

>> I can't think of any one favorite hotdog stand, but the best advice I
>> ever heard about hotdogs came from Dennis the Menace:
>>
>> "A hotdog just don't taste right without a baseball game in front of
>> it!"

"You sure that wasn't Charlie Brown in 'Peanuts'?" Harper Blue says. "I
have the distinct feeling I saw it there in a book collection.

"My favorite line like that was from the film version of '2010.' John
Lithgow is talking to Roy Scheider, asking what Roy's character misses most
about Earth. (They're both in orbit around Io on board the reactivated
Discovery.) And Roy says something like, 'Hot dogs...boiled, not fried.
Hot dogs in front of a live baseball game. It's the seventh game of the
World Series at Yankee Stadium in October, and the hot dogs have been
boiling in the pot since April.' Kitt doesn't understand this, for some
reason...." HB smiles and takes a sip of Bushmills.

--
Bruce Klaiss, MSLS
-----
"Free the Bound Periodicals!!!"
Proprietor of the Beatles' favorite coffeehouse -- Latte' Be
"Espresso -- coffee with hair. Raktajino -- coffee with TEETH!"

"Will you join in our crusade? Who will be strong and stand with me?
Somewhere beyond the barricade, is there a world you long to see?"
-- from the Broadway musical "Les Miserables"
In time of war, guard your freedoms even more closely!

Bruce Klaiss

unread,
Jul 27, 2002, 11:17:13 AM7/27/02
to
Thus quoth Laug...@mydotcomaddress.com (LaughSong) in
news:9160999.02072...@posting.google.com:


> I also enjoy Sabrett's from various streetcorner stands in NYC, and
> sometimes even here in Washington.

Harper Blue grimaces. "Oh, dear. The only Sabrett's I ever had was from a
cart in downtown Orlando, and it was terribly overdone; tough and greasy.
Turned me off to the brand."

Peter Eng

unread,
Jul 27, 2002, 6:26:36 PM7/27/02
to
In article <g4a3kugl7lanursu9...@4ax.com> ,
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote:

>
> I have to ask: do they deep-fry hotdogs in Glasgow?
>

(oblivious mode on)

No, they deep-fry hotdogs in oil.

(oblivious mode off)

Peter Eng

Arri London

unread,
Jul 27, 2002, 7:11:39 PM7/27/02
to
Ace Lightning wrote:
>
> Arri London wrote:
> >>I have to ask: do they deep-fry hotdogs in Glasgow?
> >They certainly do in London. Batter-dipped first though.
>
> Sounds a lot like corn dogs - a Southern US delicacy,
> consisting of a hot dog dipped in cornbread batter
> and deep-fried.

No...the batter isn't cornbread and not nearly as thick.

>
> >Hotdogs sometimes, but saveloys more frequently; at least in
> >my East End neighbourhood. Strange concept but not
> >necessarily bad. Never served in a bun though... only on top
> >of the open cone of chips (fries)
>
> Corn dogs are usually made by impaling the hot dog
> lengthwise with a bamboo skewer before dipping them
> in the batter. The purchaser holds the end of the
> stick and gnaws the corn dog off, rather like eating
> kebabs. Fries on the side.

Nothing like that...no stick.

>
> (What's a saveloy?)

A hideously red or red-orange tubular mystery meat. When not
served battered and fried, often served in the East End of
London accompanied by pease porridge in which to dip it.

Ace Lightning

unread,
Jul 27, 2002, 7:55:54 PM7/27/02
to
Arri London wrote:
>>>>I have to ask: do they deep-fry hotdogs in Glasgow?
>>>They certainly do in London. Batter-dipped first though.
>>Sounds a lot like corn dogs - a Southern US delicacy,
>>consisting of a hot dog dipped in cornbread batter
>>and deep-fried.
>No...the batter isn't cornbread and not nearly as thick.

I didn't expect anything British to have conrmeal in it;
I was just pointing out the vaguely similar concept of
dipping a hot dog in batter and frying it.

>>Corn dogs are usually made by impaling the hot dog
>>lengthwise with a bamboo skewer before dipping them
>>in the batter. The purchaser holds the end of the
>>stick and gnaws the corn dog off, rather like eating
>>kebabs. Fries on the side.
>Nothing like that...no stick.

Lacking a bun or a stick to hold it by, how does one
eat a fried hot dog - with a fork, or with one's bare
hands?

>>(What's a saveloy?)
>A hideously red or red-orange tubular mystery meat. When not
>served battered and fried, often served in the East End of
>London accompanied by pease porridge in which to dip it.

That sounds like the kind of food Americans (rightly or
wrongly) *expect* of British cuisine - a parody of all the
horrible things we've heard about English food.

(Let me hasten to point out that *EVERY* country has
foods that the rest of the world misunderstands, and
considers revolting.)

Arri London

unread,
Jul 27, 2002, 8:39:51 PM7/27/02
to
Ace Lightning wrote:
>
> Arri London wrote:
> >>>>I have to ask: do they deep-fry hotdogs in Glasgow?
> >>>They certainly do in London. Batter-dipped first though.
> >>Sounds a lot like corn dogs - a Southern US delicacy,
> >>consisting of a hot dog dipped in cornbread batter
> >>and deep-fried.
> >No...the batter isn't cornbread and not nearly as thick.
>
> I didn't expect anything British to have conrmeal in it;
> I was just pointing out the vaguely similar concept of
> dipping a hot dog in batter and frying it.

True enough. But for me they are so very different, I
wouldn't really make the association.


>
> >>Corn dogs are usually made by impaling the hot dog
> >>lengthwise with a bamboo skewer before dipping them
> >>in the batter. The purchaser holds the end of the
> >>stick and gnaws the corn dog off, rather like eating
> >>kebabs. Fries on the side.
> >Nothing like that...no stick.
>
> Lacking a bun or a stick to hold it by, how does one
> eat a fried hot dog - with a fork, or with one's bare
> hands?


If it's on top of an order of chips 'open', one uses one's
fingers or the wooden chip forks supplied. I don't know what
people do with it when the order is 'closed' and taken home.

>
> >>(What's a saveloy?)
> >A hideously red or red-orange tubular mystery meat. When not
> >served battered and fried, often served in the East End of
> >London accompanied by pease porridge in which to dip it.
>
> That sounds like the kind of food Americans (rightly or
> wrongly) *expect* of British cuisine - a parody of all the
> horrible things we've heard about English food.

Hardly different from anything served at McD or
Wienerschnitzel; am I to *expect* that of all American
cooking? Those too are a parody of all the horrible things
I've heard and experienced about American food.

> (Let me hasten to point out that *EVERY* country has
> foods that the rest of the world misunderstands, and
> considers revolting.)

Precisely! Goes either way doesn't it?

Basil

unread,
Jul 27, 2002, 9:24:46 PM7/27/02
to

"Such as, oh say---corndogs!"
He chortles evily as he ties a circle into the thread.

den...@tanstaafl.zipcon.net.invalid

unread,
Jul 27, 2002, 11:14:23 PM7/27/02
to
On Fri, 26 Jul 2002 15:56:30 -0400, sfw <s...@dork.com> held forth,
saying:

>Ah. Ok, ours is a far too cutesy newspaper comic panel. Like,
>nauseatingly sweet. Here:
>http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/comics/king.htm?name=Dennis_The_Menace

Hank Ketcham wouldn't agree that Dennis is over-sweet. Nor,
certainly, would Margaret or Mr. Wilson.

(I grant you, DtM had more attitude years ago. And it may be that
HK's successors don't quite have the touch. No surprise there.)

(I once attended the HS Hank K. did--there were some fascinating
historical notes up; I wonder what happened to them. That school
(same building) is luxury apartments now.)

Ace Lightning

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 1:15:41 AM7/28/02
to
Basil wrote:
>>(Let me hasten to point out that *EVERY* country has
>>foods that the rest of the world misunderstands, and
>>considers revolting.)
>"Such as, oh say---corndogs!"
>He chortles evily as he ties a circle into the thread.

Very neat, Basil - would you like a wedge of fresh lime
with your next tonic & tonic?

BTW, are you the Basil that I met in a small town in
Georgia, just outside of Chattannooga, TN, a couple
of years ago? I was the fat middle-aged Wiccan dressed
all in purple, although that was before I started dyeing
my hair to match...

Ace Lightning

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 1:15:46 AM7/28/02
to
Arri London wrote:
>>I didn't expect anything British to have conrmeal in it;
>>I was just pointing out the vaguely similar concept of
>>dipping a hot dog in batter and frying it.
>True enough. But for me they are so very different, I
>wouldn't really make the association.

What *is* the batter like?

>>Lacking a bun or a stick to hold it by, how does one
>>eat a fried hot dog - with a fork, or with one's bare
>>hands?
>If it's on top of an order of chips 'open', one uses one's
>fingers or the wooden chip forks supplied. I don't know what
>people do with it when the order is 'closed' and taken home.

Use a fork from their silverware drawer at home?



>>>>(What's a saveloy?)
>>>A hideously red or red-orange tubular mystery meat. When not
>>>served battered and fried, often served in the East End of
>>>London accompanied by pease porridge in which to dip it.
>>That sounds like the kind of food Americans (rightly or
>>wrongly) *expect* of British cuisine - a parody of all the
>>horrible things we've heard about English food.
>Hardly different from anything served at McD or
>Wienerschnitzel; am I to *expect* that of all American
>cooking? Those too are a parody of all the horrible things
>I've heard and experienced about American food.

The only "Wienerschnitzel" I'm familiar with is the
Austrian dish by that name, which is just sauteed
veal cutlets (with variations on sauces and garnishes).

But fast food does serve as an example of the worst of
American cuisine, justifiably ridiculed by people from
every other country in the world. (Although they all
seem to eat McD's food anyway, as soon as it becomes
available in their countries. Hmmm... maybe the time
has come to start marketing saveloys in the US, just
for the novelty value?)



>>(Let me hasten to point out that *EVERY* country has
>>foods that the rest of the world misunderstands, and
>>considers revolting.)
>Precisely! Goes either way doesn't it?

Then there are the foods that are promoted as "local
delicacies", and urged upon tourists as a kind of
nasty practical joke. "Oh, yes, chicken feet/sheep's
eyeballs/fermented fish/Vegemite is our most famous
national dish! You must try some!"... and then fall
down laughing at the dumb foreigners who are stupid
enough to actually *eat* the stuff... ;-)

Basil

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 2:16:39 AM7/28/02
to
On Sun, 28 Jul 2002 05:15:41 GMT, Ace Lightning
<ace.li...@verizon.net> wrote:

>Basil wrote:
>>>(Let me hasten to point out that *EVERY* country has
>>>foods that the rest of the world misunderstands, and
>>>considers revolting.)
>>"Such as, oh say---corndogs!"
>>He chortles evily as he ties a circle into the thread.
>
>Very neat, Basil - would you like a wedge of fresh lime

((I read this far and started to wince, wondering where Ace would
suggest putting it.))

>with your next tonic & tonic?

((Whew))
"Certainly. Thank you."

>BTW, are you the Basil that I met in a small town in
>Georgia, just outside of Chattannooga, TN, a couple
>of years ago? I was the fat middle-aged Wiccan dressed
>all in purple, although that was before I started dyeing
>my hair to match...

"I'm afraid not. I've never been in Georgia in my life. In fact, the
approximately 100 miles from where I am to The Strait of Georgia is
the closest I've ever been." He smiles. And The Strait of Georgia is
nowhere near The State of Georgia."


Ace Lightning

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 2:28:57 AM7/28/02
to
Basil wrote:
>>Very neat, Basil - would you like a wedge of fresh lime
>((I read this far and started to wince, wondering where Ace would
>suggest putting it.))

Now why would I do that to a perfectly innocent wedge of lime?



>>with your next tonic & tonic?
>((Whew))
>"Certainly. Thank you."

Mike, you heard the man. And put a matching wedge of lime
in my Bacardi Select & Coke, there's a dear...



>>BTW, are you the Basil that I met in a small town in
>>Georgia, just outside of Chattannooga, TN, a couple
>>of years ago? I was the fat middle-aged Wiccan dressed
>>all in purple, although that was before I started dyeing
>>my hair to match...
>"I'm afraid not. I've never been in Georgia in my life. In fact, the

I didn't think you were. But I wouldn't know if I didn't
ask...

>approximately 100 miles from where I am to The Strait of Georgia is
>the closest I've ever been." He smiles. And The Strait of Georgia is
>nowhere near The State of Georgia."

Since your email address isn't in the .ca domain, I'll hazard
a guess that you're very close to as far northwest as it's
possible to go within the Lower 48. I've never been there, but
i know someone who spends her summers on Vancouver Island.
From all reports, that's a very pretty part of the world you've
got there.

Jette Goldie

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 6:40:02 AM7/28/02
to

"Ace Lightning" <ace.li...@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:3D437D45...@verizon.net...

> Arri London wrote:
> >>I didn't expect anything British to have conrmeal in it;
> >>I was just pointing out the vaguely similar concept of
> >>dipping a hot dog in batter and frying it.
> >True enough. But for me they are so very different, I
> >wouldn't really make the association.
>
> What *is* the batter like?
>

Same batter as would be on the fish.

den...@tanstaafl.zipcon.net.invalid

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 6:45:02 AM7/28/02
to
On Sun, 28 Jul 2002 06:28:57 GMT, Ace Lightning
<ace.li...@verizon.net> held forth, saying:

>>approximately 100 miles from where I am to The Strait of Georgia is
>>the closest I've ever been." He smiles. And The Strait of Georgia is
>>nowhere near The State of Georgia."
>
>Since your email address isn't in the .ca domain, I'll hazard
>a guess that you're very close to as far northwest as it's
>possible to go within the Lower 48. I've never been there, but
>i know someone who spends her summers on Vancouver Island.
>From all reports, that's a very pretty part of the world you've
>got there.

If Basil is 100 miles from the Straits of Georgia (and not in Canada),
he's a lot closer than 100 miles to where I sit at the N. end of Lake
Washington.

FreeTrav

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 11:00:50 AM7/28/02
to
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote:

>This being July, early in the month we got the reports about the
>Nathan's hotdog eating contest. This, combined with a couple other
>things, gave me a major jones for GOOD hotdogs. Now, living in
>Seattle, one available option is The Frankfurter--they have great
>dogs. But I wanted something to fix at home.

>So. T'other day, I found packages of "Nathan's Famous"--they're very
>tasty. But what I'd like to know is this: Has anyone familiar with
>the *real* Nathan's tried the packaged ones? Do they compare?

They're similar, but unless you cook 'em on the same kind of apparatus that
Nathan's does, they won't be _the_same_.

In fact, I can tell you from personal, direct experience: Nathan's Famous
Franks taste _different_ somehow when you have them at Store Number One in
Coney Island, Brooklyn, right on the Boardwalk, rather than at any of the
other Nathan's places in the Greater NY Metro Area.

>I've never been to NY, and likely never will get there. Though such
>things as Nathan's etc are tempting.

Come visit NYC - this is a subliminal message. <g>

-----------== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Uncensored Usenet News ==----------
http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----= Over 100,000 Newsgroups - Unlimited Fast Downloads - 19 Servers =-----

FreeTrav

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 11:04:48 AM7/28/02
to
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote:

>On 25 Jul 2002 21:07:03 -0700, mag...@att.net (Magister) held forth,
>saying:

>>Have you ever heard of "Hebrew National"? They're kosher hotdogs...and
>>the BEST I've EVER had, bar none! No fillers, no nasty aftertaste.
>>They come in two sizes, regular and dinner franks (the bigger one). I
>>love their slogan.."We answer to a higher authority" (tm)

>Yup. I know they're good--haven't tried 'em yet. The 'Canadian
>Jumbos' you get some places in town are fair.

>My biggest (only, I guess) gripe about the Nathan's dogs is that
>they're skinless. I just have a strong preference for biting into a
>dog and having it *pop* and spurt some juice.

Ummmm... Nathan's has a with-skins version; that is, in fact, what they
serve at their restaurants/stands. In fact, when I first saw Nathan's in
the supermarket, that was _all_ they had.

Come visit NYC ... this is a subliminal message <g>

>Next pack of dogs I buy will likely be Hebrew Nationals.

These are absolutely the best kosher dogs I've had.

Arri London

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 11:49:27 AM7/28/02
to
Ace Lightning wrote:
>
> Arri London wrote:
> >>I didn't expect anything British to have conrmeal in it;
> >>I was just pointing out the vaguely similar concept of
> >>dipping a hot dog in batter and frying it.
> >True enough. But for me they are so very different, I
> >wouldn't really make the association.
>
> What *is* the batter like?

Same batter as on the fish, flour and a liquid mostly,
probably some commercial additives. Not too thick and fries
up very crispy all the way down to the fish. Some not very
good chippies make it too thick and the layer next to the
fish (or whatever) is soggy and greasy UGH!

>
> >>Lacking a bun or a stick to hold it by, how does one
> >>eat a fried hot dog - with a fork, or with one's bare
> >>hands?
> >If it's on top of an order of chips 'open', one uses one's
> >fingers or the wooden chip forks supplied. I don't know what
> >people do with it when the order is 'closed' and taken home.
>
> Use a fork from their silverware drawer at home?

Most likely, although I'd probably eat it with my fingers at
home as well.


>
> >>>>(What's a saveloy?)
> >>>A hideously red or red-orange tubular mystery meat. When not
> >>>served battered and fried, often served in the East End of
> >>>London accompanied by pease porridge in which to dip it.
> >>That sounds like the kind of food Americans (rightly or
> >>wrongly) *expect* of British cuisine - a parody of all the
> >>horrible things we've heard about English food.
> >Hardly different from anything served at McD or
> >Wienerschnitzel; am I to *expect* that of all American
> >cooking? Those too are a parody of all the horrible things
> >I've heard and experienced about American food.
>
> The only "Wienerschnitzel" I'm familiar with is the
> Austrian dish by that name, which is just sauteed
> veal cutlets (with variations on sauces and garnishes).

A chain of hotdog places. I'd assumed they were national,
but perhaps not.


>
> But fast food does serve as an example of the worst of
> American cuisine, justifiably ridiculed by people from
> every other country in the world. (Although they all
> seem to eat McD's food anyway, as soon as it becomes
> available in their countries. Hmmm... maybe the time
> has come to start marketing saveloys in the US, just
> for the novelty value?)

Not much point. Quite similar to the worst American hotdogs
and 'polish' sausages. They aren't highly regarded in the UK
either, but readily available around London anyway. Not
certain if they go farther than that.

>
> >>(Let me hasten to point out that *EVERY* country has
> >>foods that the rest of the world misunderstands, and
> >>considers revolting.)
> >Precisely! Goes either way doesn't it?
>
> Then there are the foods that are promoted as "local
> delicacies", and urged upon tourists as a kind of
> nasty practical joke. "Oh, yes, chicken feet/sheep's
> eyeballs/fermented fish/Vegemite is our most famous
> national dish! You must try some!"... and then fall
> down laughing at the dumb foreigners who are stupid
> enough to actually *eat* the stuff... ;-)


LOL! I put peanut butter and grape jelly sandwiches in that
category.

Arri London

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 11:50:52 AM7/28/02
to

Dunno...I've met people who say they like corndogs. Haven't
met anyone who has said they like saveloys.

Pat Brimhall

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 7:31:59 PM7/28/02
to
On Sat, 27 Jul 2002 01:53:19 GMT, Ace Lightning
<ace.li...@verizon.net> wrote:

>Corn dogs are usually made by impaling the hot dog
>lengthwise with a bamboo skewer before dipping them
>in the batter. The purchaser holds the end of the
>stick and gnaws the corn dog off, rather like eating
>kebabs. Fries on the side.

I forget what it is called, but there is also a breakfast version you
can buy frozen in the grocery stores around here: A breakfast sausage
link impaled on a skewer, dipped in pancake batter and fried. Reheat
it in the micowave and you have a breakfast to go (along with "maple"
syrup to dip it in).

Pat B.
--
"If cats and humans live together, *someone* is going to get trained.
Left to chance, it isn't going to be the cat."

Basil

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 9:35:55 PM7/28/02
to
On Sun, 28 Jul 2002 06:28:57 GMT, Ace Lightning
<ace.li...@verizon.net> wrote:

>Basil wrote:
>>>Very neat, Basil - would you like a wedge of fresh lime
>>((I read this far and started to wince, wondering where Ace would
>>suggest putting it.))
>
>Now why would I do that to a perfectly innocent wedge of lime?

Basil gets a wicked grin. "I refuse to speculate. --- At least, out
loud."

>
>>>with your next tonic & tonic?
>>((Whew))
>>"Certainly. Thank you."
>
>Mike, you heard the man. And put a matching wedge of lime
>in my Bacardi Select & Coke, there's a dear...

Mike sticks the wedge on the last T&T, that's still waiting for Basil
to get to it.



>>>BTW, are you the Basil that I met in a small town in
>>>Georgia, just outside of Chattannooga, TN, a couple
>>>of years ago? I was the fat middle-aged Wiccan dressed
>>>all in purple, although that was before I started dyeing
>>>my hair to match...
>>"I'm afraid not. I've never been in Georgia in my life. In fact, the
>
>I didn't think you were. But I wouldn't know if I didn't
>ask...

"True. No harm done, either."

>>approximately 100 miles from where I am to The Strait of Georgia is
>>the closest I've ever been." He smiles. And The Strait of Georgia is
>>nowhere near The State of Georgia."
>
>Since your email address isn't in the .ca domain, I'll hazard
>a guess that you're very close to as far northwest as it's
>possible to go within the Lower 48. I've never been there, but
>i know someone who spends her summers on Vancouver Island.
>From all reports, that's a very pretty part of the world you've
>got there.

"I think so." He smiles, looking out the window at the green green
trees."

"As I said, I'm in the upper-left-hand corner of the consistent 48.
Though not *all* the way northwest; after all, the south end of the
Strait of Georgia is split between the US and Canada."

The From address is valid, but I rarely look at it. To reach me, use buzz <at> hod <dot> aarg <dot> net
--
I'm not paranoid, the world *is* out to get me!

Basil

unread,
Jul 28, 2002, 9:39:04 PM7/28/02
to
On Sun, 28 Jul 2002 03:45:02 -0700,
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote:

>On Sun, 28 Jul 2002 06:28:57 GMT, Ace Lightning
><ace.li...@verizon.net> held forth, saying:
>
>>>approximately 100 miles from where I am to The Strait of Georgia is
>>>the closest I've ever been." He smiles. And The Strait of Georgia is
>>>nowhere near The State of Georgia."
>>
>>Since your email address isn't in the .ca domain, I'll hazard
>>a guess that you're very close to as far northwest as it's
>>possible to go within the Lower 48. I've never been there, but
>>i know someone who spends her summers on Vancouver Island.
>>From all reports, that's a very pretty part of the world you've
>>got there.
>
>If Basil is 100 miles from the Straits of Georgia (and not in Canada),
>he's a lot closer than 100 miles to where I sit at the N. end of Lake
>Washington.

Basil blinks, then smiles. "You certainly are. Sno Valley myself."

The From address is valid, but I rarely look at it. To reach me, use buzz <at> hod <dot> aarg <dot> net
--

[She] is one of the secret masters of the world: a librarian. They control information. Don't ever piss one off. -- Spider Robinson, "Callahan's Touch"

Bruce Klaiss

unread,
Jul 29, 2002, 12:35:36 AM7/29/02
to
Thus quoth Pat Brimhall <pb...@ticnet.com> in
news:4kv8ku4q4in886r6i...@4ax.com:


>>Corn dogs are usually made by impaling the hot dog
>>lengthwise with a bamboo skewer before dipping them
>>in the batter. The purchaser holds the end of the
>>stick and gnaws the corn dog off, rather like eating
>>kebabs. Fries on the side.
>
> I forget what it is called, but there is also a breakfast version you
> can buy frozen in the grocery stores around here: A breakfast sausage
> link impaled on a skewer, dipped in pancake batter and fried. Reheat
> it in the micowave and you have a breakfast to go (along with "maple"
> syrup to dip it in).

"In a word....BLETCH!"

Lee S. Billings

unread,
Jul 29, 2002, 12:47:39 AM7/29/02
to
In article <4kv8ku4q4in886r6i...@4ax.com>, pb...@ticnet.com
says...

>
>On Sat, 27 Jul 2002 01:53:19 GMT, Ace Lightning
><ace.li...@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>>Corn dogs are usually made by impaling the hot dog
>>lengthwise with a bamboo skewer before dipping them
>>in the batter. The purchaser holds the end of the
>>stick and gnaws the corn dog off, rather like eating
>>kebabs. Fries on the side.
>
>I forget what it is called, but there is also a breakfast version you
>can buy frozen in the grocery stores around here: A breakfast sausage
>link impaled on a skewer, dipped in pancake batter and fried. Reheat
>it in the micowave and you have a breakfast to go (along with "maple"
>syrup to dip it in).

Eewww. *Sausage* dipped in syrup? Talk about flavors that don't work together!

Celine

--
"Only the powers of evil claim that doing good is boring."
-- Diane Duane, _Nightfall at Algemron_

Ace Lightning

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Jul 29, 2002, 4:48:07 AM7/29/02
to
Arri London wrote:
>>What *is* the batter like?
>Same batter as on the fish, flour and a liquid mostly,
>probably some commercial additives. Not too thick and fries
>up very crispy all the way down to the fish. Some not very
>good chippies make it too thick and the layer next to the
>fish (or whatever) is soggy and greasy UGH!

I like that kind of batter on fried things. I can't
eat fish, but it works well on pieces of boneless
chicken breast. I like crisp things. I might even
like it on a hot dog.

>>But fast food does serve as an example of the worst of
>>American cuisine, justifiably ridiculed by people from
>>every other country in the world. (Although they all
>>seem to eat McD's food anyway, as soon as it becomes
>>available in their countries. Hmmm... maybe the time
>>has come to start marketing saveloys in the US, just
>>for the novelty value?)
>Not much point. Quite similar to the worst American hotdogs
>and 'polish' sausages. They aren't highly regarded in the UK
>either, but readily available around London anyway. Not
>certain if they go farther than that.

Well, I can remember when nobody would have believed
that the American public would ever eat bits of raw
fish... so you never know.

>>Then there are the foods that are promoted as "local
>>delicacies", and urged upon tourists as a kind of
>>nasty practical joke. "Oh, yes, chicken feet/sheep's
>>eyeballs/fermented fish/Vegemite is our most famous
>>national dish! You must try some!"... and then fall
>>down laughing at the dumb foreigners who are stupid
>>enough to actually *eat* the stuff... ;-)
>LOL! I put peanut butter and grape jelly sandwiches in that
>category.

I like grape jelly. I like peanut butter. But even when
I was a child, I could never see how they went together.
I'd either eat a peanut-butter sandwich, or a jelly
sandwich.

Ace Lightning

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Jul 29, 2002, 4:49:35 AM7/29/02
to
Pat Brimhall wrote:
>>Corn dogs are usually made by impaling the hot dog
>>lengthwise with a bamboo skewer before dipping them
>>in the batter. The purchaser holds the end of the
>>stick and gnaws the corn dog off, rather like eating
>>kebabs. Fries on the side.
>I forget what it is called, but there is also a breakfast version you
>can buy frozen in the grocery stores around here: A breakfast sausage
>link impaled on a skewer, dipped in pancake batter and fried. Reheat
>it in the micowave and you have a breakfast to go (along with "maple"
>syrup to dip it in).

While I can see the logic of assembling sausage,
pancake, and syrup into one easy-to-manage package,
it sounds revolting.

Ace Lightning

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Jul 29, 2002, 4:51:04 AM7/29/02
to
Basil wrote:
>>>>Very neat, Basil - would you like a wedge of fresh lime
>>>((I read this far and started to wince, wondering where Ace would
>>>suggest putting it.))
>>Now why would I do that to a perfectly innocent wedge of lime?
>Basil gets a wicked grin. "I refuse to speculate. --- At least, out
>loud."

Of course, if you're into that sort of thing... ;-)

>>>approximately 100 miles from where I am to The Strait of Georgia is
>>>the closest I've ever been." He smiles. And The Strait of Georgia is
>>>nowhere near The State of Georgia."
>>Since your email address isn't in the .ca domain, I'll hazard
>>a guess that you're very close to as far northwest as it's
>>possible to go within the Lower 48. I've never been there, but
>>i know someone who spends her summers on Vancouver Island.
>>From all reports, that's a very pretty part of the world you've
>>got there.
>"I think so." He smiles, looking out the window at the green green
>trees."
>"As I said, I'm in the upper-left-hand corner of the consistent 48.
>Though not *all* the way northwest; after all, the south end of the
>Strait of Georgia is split between the US and Canada."

It's on my list of Places I Want To Visit Someday!

Ace Lightning

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Jul 29, 2002, 4:56:57 AM7/29/02
to
"Lee S. Billings" wrote:
>>I forget what it is called, but there is also a breakfast version you
>>can buy frozen in the grocery stores around here: A breakfast sausage
>>link impaled on a skewer, dipped in pancake batter and fried. Reheat
>>it in the micowave and you have a breakfast to go (along with "maple"
>>syrup to dip it in).
>Eewww. *Sausage* dipped in syrup? Talk about flavors that don't work together!

Well, if you have pancakes and sausages on a plate,
and you pour syrup on the pancakes, some of the
syrup is probably going to get on the sausages. I
suppose the sausage-on-a-skewer food item could
use that as the justification. But "maple flavored"
syrup is an utter abomination! (I spent a decent
percentage of my mis-spent youth in New Hampshire,
where maple syrup is almost a religion unto itself.
Incidentally, I've found that the little flat pint
tins of real maple syrup, which are fairly inexpensive
in US supermarkets, make wonderful hostess gifts
when traveling to other continents. Very little maple
syrup gets exported, it seems, so the real stuff is
astronomically expensive overseas, when they can get
it at all.)

den...@tanstaafl.zipcon.net.invalid

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Jul 29, 2002, 5:52:37 AM7/29/02
to
On Sun, 28 Jul 2002 11:04:48 -0400, FreeTrav <m...@privacy.net> held
forth, saying:

>Ummmm... Nathan's has a with-skins version; that is, in fact, what they
>serve at their restaurants/stands. In fact, when I first saw Nathan's in
>the supermarket, that was _all_ they had.

Wish that's what we got here.

>Come visit NYC ... this is a subliminal message <g>
>
>>Next pack of dogs I buy will likely be Hebrew Nationals.
>
>These are absolutely the best kosher dogs I've had.

Had a Hebrew National dog today at Safeco Field (Mariners lost 1-0,
dammit), and while 'twas good, I'll need further sampling to make my
final decision on 'em.

LeAnne

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Jul 29, 2002, 8:37:17 AM7/29/02
to
LeAnne wrote:
>
>
> (Chicago dogs are topped with neon green dill relish, tomatoes, onions, > mustard, and a sprinkling of carroway or poppy seeds)
>
Oh, and celery salt...mustn't forget the celery salt! Chicago-style dogs
have been referred to as "hot dogs for grownups!"

LeAnne, salivating heavily

LeAnne

unread,
Jul 29, 2002, 8:42:39 AM7/29/02
to
sfw wrote:
>
> LaughSong wrote:
> >
> > Sarah wrote
> > > Can't get a
> > > proper dog here at all. The closest I've found is the Chili Dogs at
> > > Ben's Chili Bowl http://www.benschilibowl.com/
> >
> > Wow, who'd've guessed The Bowl would have a website?
>
> I note that I did not find a website for the Vienna Inn - the DH's
> favorite local chili dogs.
>
Oh, goodness, yes. The hot dogs themselves aren't unique (good ol' Oscar
Meyer), but the atmosphere just can't be beat...and the location,
conveniently near the W&OD bike trail for a quick nosh. The chili cheese
fries are also worth a stop. Perhaps the Vienna Inn or Ben's would be
possibilities for a DC RS sometime in autumn? PS. You heard the Vienna
Inn had a fire recently, right? Just the office, I believe...no serious
damage to the kitchen or dining area, and they were planning to reopen
fairly soon after the fire.

LeAnne

Arri London

unread,
Jul 29, 2002, 8:48:57 AM7/29/02
to
Ace Lightning wrote:
>
> Arri London wrote:
> >>What *is* the batter like?
> >Same batter as on the fish, flour and a liquid mostly,
> >probably some commercial additives. Not too thick and fries
> >up very crispy all the way down to the fish. Some not very
> >good chippies make it too thick and the layer next to the
> >fish (or whatever) is soggy and greasy UGH!
>
> I like that kind of batter on fried things. I can't
> eat fish, but it works well on pieces of boneless
> chicken breast. I like crisp things. I might even
> like it on a hot dog.

Try it on a good hot dog. It doesn't really add much, but
makes a change.


>
> >>But fast food does serve as an example of the worst of
> >>American cuisine, justifiably ridiculed by people from
> >>every other country in the world. (Although they all
> >>seem to eat McD's food anyway, as soon as it becomes
> >>available in their countries. Hmmm... maybe the time
> >>has come to start marketing saveloys in the US, just
> >>for the novelty value?)
> >Not much point. Quite similar to the worst American hotdogs
> >and 'polish' sausages. They aren't highly regarded in the UK
> >either, but readily available around London anyway. Not
> >certain if they go farther than that.
>
> Well, I can remember when nobody would have believed
> that the American public would ever eat bits of raw
> fish... so you never know.

True... but then many Americans, of Korean, Japanese and
Dutch origins, have always eaten raw fish. Lots of people in
the US are pretty much eating saveloys in any case...they're
just not called that.


>
> >>Then there are the foods that are promoted as "local
> >>delicacies", and urged upon tourists as a kind of
> >>nasty practical joke. "Oh, yes, chicken feet/sheep's
> >>eyeballs/fermented fish/Vegemite is our most famous
> >>national dish! You must try some!"... and then fall
> >>down laughing at the dumb foreigners who are stupid
> >>enough to actually *eat* the stuff... ;-)
> >LOL! I put peanut butter and grape jelly sandwiches in that
> >category.
>
> I like grape jelly. I like peanut butter. But even when
> I was a child, I could never see how they went together.
> I'd either eat a peanut-butter sandwich, or a jelly
> sandwich.

Agreed but I dislike grape jelly intensely! All for a really
good raspberry (or whatever) conserve on freshly-baked bread
spread with unsalted butter. Have even on occasion spread
peanut butter on such bread, minus the dairy butter. To mix
the two....probably only if I'm starving and there is
nothing else to eat.

Fire...@firesong.co.uk

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Jul 29, 2002, 9:12:02 AM7/29/02
to
On Fri, 26 Jul 2002 17:54:01 GMT, "Jette Goldie"
<j...@blueyonder.com.uk> wrote:

>
>"Magister" <mag...@att.net> wrote
>> I can't think of any one favorite hotdog stand, but the best advice I
>> ever heard about hotdogs came from Dennis the Menace:
>>
>> "A hotdog just don't taste right without a baseball game in front of
>> it!"
>
>
>Hmmm, must be a completely different Dennis the
>Menace to the one I grew up with - our Dennis never
>saw a baseball game in his puff!
>
>(he'd probably call it a *sissy* game)
>
><g>

Have you not seen the American Dennis?

Blonde, neat and feels guilty when he breaks things.

Just not the same. Not even slightly.

Firesong
>
>

--
"If we knew what we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?" - Albert Einstein
http://www.firesong.co.uk

Fire...@firesong.co.uk

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Jul 29, 2002, 9:18:03 AM7/29/02
to
On Fri, 26 Jul 2002 15:32:21 -0400, sfw <s...@dork.com> wrote:

>Jette Goldie wrote:
>>
>> "Magister" <mag...@att.net> wrote
>> > I can't think of any one favorite hotdog stand, but the best advice I
>> > ever heard about hotdogs came from Dennis the Menace:
>> >
>> > "A hotdog just don't taste right without a baseball game in front of
>> > it!"
>>
>> Hmmm, must be a completely different Dennis the
>> Menace to the one I grew up with - our Dennis never
>> saw a baseball game in his puff!
>>
>> (he'd probably call it a *sissy* game)
>

>Well, I believe that the quote is actually from Charlie Brown, in
>Peanuts.
>
>I'm assuming your Dennis the Menace is something other than the comic?
>And, "In his puff"? Definition please?
>
>Sarah

Our Dennis the Menace is a comic strip character, accompanied by his
dog Gnasher. Mostly involved in the wanton deliberate destruction of
property or the assault of "Soppy Walter".

Strip usually ends in Dennis getting beaten by his father with a
slipper, to everyone else's grins.

www.collingwoodohare.com/ dennis/dennis.html

sfw

unread,
Jul 29, 2002, 9:48:58 AM7/29/02
to
LeAnne wrote:
> PS. You heard the Vienna
> Inn had a fire recently, right? Just the office, I believe...no serious
> damage to the kitchen or dining area, and they were planning to reopen
> fairly soon after the fire.

I hadn't, actually. I've never been there myself. The DH used to work
out that way, and so, went with workpeople for lunch sometimes. I don't
get out that way much.

Sarah

John Palmer

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Jul 29, 2002, 11:01:26 AM7/29/02
to
On 29 Jul 2002 04:47:39 GMT, stard...@mindspring.com (Lee S.
Billings) wrote:

>>I forget what it is called, but there is also a breakfast version you


>>can buy frozen in the grocery stores around here: A breakfast sausage
>>link impaled on a skewer, dipped in pancake batter and fried. Reheat
>>it in the micowave and you have a breakfast to go (along with "maple"
>>syrup to dip it in).
>
>Eewww. *Sausage* dipped in syrup? Talk about flavors that don't work together!

I quite agree... but there's a large number of folks who love it.
Now, I grew up in Philadelphia, where ketchup on scrambled eggs is
relatively normal, and where people eat scrapple (cornmeal mush, pig
squeal[1], and spices all mixed into a solid, slice-able block that's
better tasting than it sounds (okay, that's almost vacuously true, I
suppose)), but that thought still makes me wince a bit.

[1] In a book involving meat packing, there's a joke about "they use
every part of the pig except the squeal", to which I respond "unless
they make scrapple, in which case they use the squeal, as well."
Really, it's the same stuff they might put in sausage, I imagine, and
I'm sure most folks have heard the bit about "the less people know
about how the law, and sausages, are made, the better they'll sleep at
night."
--
Everything I needed to know in life, I learned in kindergarten. Like:
Evaluation of the defensive, and retreat, possibilities of your position
is essential. Especially when an angry nun with a metal ruler is
approaching.

John Palmer

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Jul 29, 2002, 11:16:23 AM7/29/02
to
On Mon, 29 Jul 2002 02:52:37 -0700,
den...@TANSTAAFL.zipcon.net.invalid wrote:

>On Sun, 28 Jul 2002 11:04:48 -0400, FreeTrav <m...@privacy.net> held
>forth, saying:
>
>>Ummmm... Nathan's has a with-skins version; that is, in fact, what they
>>serve at their restaurants/stands. In fact, when I first saw Nathan's in
>>the supermarket, that was _all_ they had.
>
>Wish that's what we got here.
>
>>Come visit NYC ... this is a subliminal message <g>
>>
>>>Next pack of dogs I buy will likely be Hebrew Nationals.
>>
>>These are absolutely the best kosher dogs I've had.
>
>Had a Hebrew National dog today at Safeco Field (Mariners lost 1-0,
>dammit), and while 'twas good, I'll need further sampling to make my
>final decision on 'em.

Well, if you're at 212th and 68th, go west to the gas
station/mini-mart next to the Wendy's. Go to the rolling grill they
have. If you're exceptionally lucky, you'll see a properly cooked hot
dog... the skin is a slightly different color from the toasting effect
of the hot rollers, and it's puffed up evenly from cooking. (I worked
at a hot dog stand for several years, and I know when a 'dog is just
right :-) )

Frankly (ouch... that was unintentional!), I think those rollers
are the perfect hot dog cooker.

Anyway: the mustard's decent, the packets of relish are okay,
but the onions and the saurkraut are, IMHO, worth skipping. The chili
sauce is decent (but, for me, without onions, I'd skip it).

It's a tad bit too much trouble if you're not already near, and
the hot dogs are, unfortunately, not honorably retired until it's much
later than they should be (but, I dunno... sometimes a hot dog is
better when it's skin is toasted and it's mostly degreased). But,
they do serve Hebrew National, and if you get them just right, they're
really good.