P2R phillips bit -- what is it?

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Esther & Fester Bestertester

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Apr 7, 2008, 10:45:23 AM4/7/08
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Found these among my 1/4-inch driver bits. Tried to use them for #2 phillips
screws and snapped off a couple.

What are these for?

Thanks,
FBt

willshak

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Apr 7, 2008, 11:10:45 AM4/7/08
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on 4/7/2008 10:45 AM Esther & Fester Bestertester said the following:
Phillips Pressure Treated wood screws. You probably got the bits in a
box of the screws.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
To email, remove the double zeroes after @

Charlie Bress

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Apr 7, 2008, 11:19:47 AM4/7/08
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"Esther & Fester Bestertester" <n...@me.really> wrote in message
news:0001HW.C41F8193...@news.sf.sbcglobal.net...
A Google search found this under Craftsman tools :P2R Phillips drywall bit


Robert Allison

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Apr 7, 2008, 11:35:32 AM4/7/08
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That is supposedly a special drywall screw bit, but I use them
for everything if I have them and I can't tell a whole lot of
difference except that they are narrower than a standard #2 along
the body of the bit.

--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
Georgetown, TX

Esther & Fester Bestertester

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Apr 7, 2008, 11:36:51 AM4/7/08
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> A Google search found this under Craftsman tools :P2R Phillips drywall bit

I too saw that in the Craftsman too set.

So what? It doesn't say what it is for.

Google is not always the answer.

SteveB

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Apr 7, 2008, 1:50:34 PM4/7/08
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"Charlie Bress" <le...@thirdbase.com> wrote in message
news:fK2dnQtYiIsJpmfa...@comcast.com...

What do we need a newsgroup for when we have Google? Every question that's
ever been asked and every fact of life is in Google. I say we kill all
newsgroups.

Steve


Glenn

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Apr 7, 2008, 12:15:42 PM4/7/08
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"SteveB" <pittma...@henderson.com> wrote in message
news:hespc5-...@news.infowest.com...
Bye, Steve. [g]

SteveB

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Apr 7, 2008, 4:39:54 PM4/7/08
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"Glenn" <pil...@kc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:47fa489e$0$16683$4c36...@roadrunner.com...

WATCH OUT FOR THAT DOORKNOB!


aspasia

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Apr 7, 2008, 4:34:22 PM4/7/08
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Au contraire, let's kill Google, the leaky sieve, the human rights
violator (remember the China tragedy?) and keep the newsgroups!

Glenn

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Apr 7, 2008, 4:51:48 PM4/7/08
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"Esther & Fester Bestertester" <n...@me.really> wrote in
message
news:0001HW.C41F8193...@news.sf.sbcglobal.net...
I'm not sure what they are either. Back some time ago,
before I retired, we had 2 shapes of Phillips #2. one
was normal and the other was real narrow. I don't
remember the number designation for the narrow one but
I liked it because it sat deeper in the screw and I
thought it held better. That's kinda what yours sounds
like.

SteveB

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Apr 7, 2008, 7:25:55 PM4/7/08
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"Glenn" <pil...@kc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:47fa8933$0$6492$4c36...@roadrunner.com...

If you would have Googled better, you would have found that some Phillips
tips have serrations and are made of harder metal and metal of different
metallurgy to resist chipping, stripping and schlipping.

But you knew that, right?

You know everything.


Steve


Glenn

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Apr 7, 2008, 5:50:20 PM4/7/08
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"SteveB" <pittma...@henderson.com> wrote in message
news:a3gqc5-...@news.infowest.com...
>

> But you knew that, right?
>
> You know everything.
>
>
> Steve

You seem to have a problem but I have no idea what it
is.

SteveB

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Apr 7, 2008, 10:08:11 PM4/7/08
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"Glenn" <pil...@kc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:47fa96e2$0$6481$4c36...@roadrunner.com...

I'm confused. The other day you said goodbye, and now you are answering me.

I'm soooo confuuuuuuuuused.

Steve


Glenn

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Apr 7, 2008, 8:24:21 PM4/7/08
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"SteveB" <pittma...@henderson.com> wrote in message
news:ijpqc5-...@news.infowest.com...
Not too bright either, I take it. You were talking
about not having newsgroups and I said bye to you
seeing as you were the one complaining. You sounded
like you were leaving. I'm not.

And yes, I do know quite a lot. As the saying goes,
I've probably forgot more than a lot of you will ever
know. [g]

Mike O.

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Apr 7, 2008, 10:24:40 PM4/7/08
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I found a link that referred to them as "Phillips Reduced". Found about 800
hits on that phrase. Looks like a thinner version of Phillips. Not sure
where you would use them, though.

Mike O.

"Esther & Fester Bestertester" <n...@me.really> wrote in message
news:0001HW.C41F8193...@news.sf.sbcglobal.net...

Roscoe P Pendoscoe

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Apr 8, 2008, 8:16:46 AM4/8/08
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You were not specific. Snapped off what, the screws or the bits?

If you snapped off either I would have to guess your torque setting is
set too high for the strength of the screw. The bits typically are
hardened. Should be set to stop when screw head has reached flush with
the material you are attaching or just below if it's drywall.

Regards

Knowledge is like money, the less you talk about it
the more people assume you have.

mkir...@rochester.rr.com

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Apr 8, 2008, 12:24:48 PM4/8/08
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On Apr 7, 11:36 am, Esther & Fester Bestertester <n...@me.really>
wrote:

> > A Google search found this under Craftsman  tools :P2R Phillips drywall bit

> So what? It doesn't say what it is for.

What part about the word "drywall" do you not understand?

> Google is not always the answer.

Yes, it is.

Esther & Fester Bestertester

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Apr 8, 2008, 1:59:27 PM4/8/08
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Let me rephrase that...

When & why would you use a P2R bit rather than a regular P2 bit? Are drywall
screws specifically meant to be driven with P2R bits? It seems that P2R bits
are more broadly purposed than just for drywall...

Looking for more than Google gives on P2R... (although now that I know it
stands for Reed-Prince, I do find more). But Googling "P2R" only says it's
for drywall, which I find ... an incomplete answer.

So, no, Google is not always the answer.

willshak

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Apr 8, 2008, 3:29:03 PM4/8/08
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on 4/8/2008 1:59 PM Esther & Fester Bestertester said the following:

If it works in a Phillips head screw, what the hell's the difference if
it is a P2R bit or a #2 Phillips bit?.
Just hold on to it until you get screws that it will only fit.
All this crap because of a number on a bit.

SteveB

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Apr 8, 2008, 10:53:47 PM4/8/08
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"Esther & Fester Bestertester" <n...@me.really> wrote in message
news:0001HW.C421008F...@news.sf.sbcglobal.net...

It is if you don't know dick and are trying to evade the subject.

Steve <g>


SteveB

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Apr 8, 2008, 10:50:56 PM4/8/08
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"Glenn" <pil...@kc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:47fabaf6$0$17370$4c36...@roadrunner.com...

Full of it today, aren't we?

I did once think I was perfect. I never want to be that sick again.

Steve


DanG

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Apr 8, 2008, 9:30:00 PM4/8/08
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The main company involved in replaceable screwdriver tips is Apex.

Apex is owned by Cooper industries.

Quotation from their site:
Apex offers a choice of three heat treat hardness levels in many
of our screwdriver bits to match the application. These heat
treats are specified by a letter suffix as follows:
X - Hardest heat treat in the industry
I - Intermediate hardness
R - Lowest hardness
Our experienced staff can help in selecting the best heat treat
for your particular application.
Apex bits & sockets last ten longer than most of our competition.

If you really want to know more:
http://www.cooperpowertools.com/catalog_pdf/index.cfm?parent1=10

--
______________________________
Keep the whole world singing . . . .
DanG (remove the sevens)
dgri...@7cox.net

"Esther & Fester Bestertester" <n...@me.really> wrote in message

news:0001HW.C41F8193...@news.sf.sbcglobal.net...

Esther & Fester Bestertester

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Apr 9, 2008, 12:56:58 AM4/9/08
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> http://www.cooperpowertools.com/catalog_pdf/index.cfm?parent1=10

According to this reference, the bits I've been snapping off are the
small-diameter "limited clearance" phillips bits. They are smaller diameter
apparently for no reason other than to allow access in restricted spaces.

Now I know...

Thanks, DanG!

Ain't USENET great?! (Chinese spam, 2-party bickering, and "Google Is The
Answer" 'bots, notwithstanding...)

FBt

Tekkie®

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Apr 9, 2008, 9:56:04 PM4/9/08
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Robert Allison posted for all of us...

> Esther & Fester Bestertester wrote:
> > Found these among my 1/4-inch driver bits. Tried to use them for #2 phillips
> > screws and snapped off a couple.
> >
> > What are these for?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > FBt
> >
>
> That is supposedly a special drywall screw bit, but I use them
> for everything if I have them and I can't tell a whole lot of
> difference except that they are narrower than a standard #2 along
> the body of the bit.
>
>

Yup the r stands for reduced shank - the shank is only as wide as the wings
while a reguler bit is the 1/4 hex size.
--
Tekkie Don't bother to thank me, I do this as a public service.

404unimog

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Oct 25, 2017, 9:44:03 PM10/25/17
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replying to Esther & Fester Bestertester, 404unimog wrote:
I think this will clear things up. The reduced shank and the smaller tip size
is there to reduce the chance of tearing the paper or reaming the paper from
around the tapered screw head. if the screw is set to deep or the paper tares
that that reduces that screws hold strength x 65% or more even after finishing
Plus remember paper tape is used to bond two sheets together for strength and
fire proofing as well

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/construction/p2r-phillips-bit-what-is-it-13386-.htm


404unimog

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Oct 25, 2017, 11:14:05 PM10/25/17
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replying to Charlie Bress, 404unimog wrote:
I think this will clear things up. The reduced shank and the smaller tip size
is there to reduce the chance of tearing the paper or reaming the paper from
around the tapered screw head. if the screw is set to deep or the paper tares
that reduces that screws hold strength x 65% or more even after finishing Plus
remember paper tape is used to bond two sheets together for strength and fire
proofing as well

And also as stated The tip don't ream the screw hole so wide when counter
sinking into wood

cazanjc

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May 21, 2018, 8:14:04 AM5/21/18
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replying to Esther & Fester Bestertester, cazanjc wrote:
PR #2 stands for Phillips reduced #2 ... professional drywall screw bit for
Better fit, less slipping and stripping, faster driving
SPECIALIZED DRYWALL SCREW BITS with slightly reduced head size for tighter fit
and NO-SLIP, NO-STRIP GRIP

Pssst3

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Jun 9, 2018, 5:44:11 PM6/9/18
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replying to Esther & Fester Bestertester, Pssst3 wrote:
A standard cross-head bit is much larger in diameter than the recess in the
head of the fastener with which it is to be used.
A PR bit is smaller (R= reduced) diameter, intended for applications like
drywall installation where it's desirable to have the fastener sunk slightly
below the finished surface. They are normally used with a specialized holder
that holds the fastener and helps to limit the fastener's driven depth. The
reduced diameter does what the original Phillips bits did with the non-ISO
fasteners, which is to cam out. If a new design ISO-ph bit were used with
drywall, it would be possible to drive the screw completely through the
drywall.

Malcom

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Jun 16, 2019, 11:44:03 PM6/16/19
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replying to Esther & Fester Bestertester, Malcom wrote:
I’m in construction, and recently found these PR2 bits. I love them! They
fit snugly into the screw and I don’t have them pop out nearly as often as
the standard P2. I’ve used them in everything from draywall screws to wider
set brass toilet flange
screws.

Tekkie®

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Jun 18, 2019, 5:14:01 PM6/18/19
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Malcom posted for all of us...


>
> replying to Esther & Fester Bestertester, Malcom wrote:
> I�m in construction, and recently found these PR2 bits. I love them! They
> fit snugly into the screw and I don�t have them pop out nearly as often as
> the standard P2. I�ve used them in everything from draywall screws to wider
> set brass toilet flange
> screws.
>
> --
> for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/construction/p2r-phillips-bit-what-is-it-13386-.htm

datz nize

--
Tekkie

GARY HOLMGREN

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Oct 24, 2020, 6:15:04 PM10/24/20
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I'm not an "expert" but have used many, many driver bits and have been looking for P2R bits locally but unable to find any. Apparently a big box store 14 miles away has a few but driving fuel would triple the cost.
I'm doing some sheet rock installation using drywall screws. I knew regular P2 bits DO NOT WORK WELL with drywall screws as if there is much resistance to driving them, the bit will cam out, even applying a lot of force to the driver and keeping it square with the screw. I gave up on P2R's and bought a 5-pack of "Big Yellow's" with depth control collar, specifically for driving drywall screws and theoretically controlling the depth so that the paper skin is not 'ruptured', or broken thru by the outer edge of the screw head. If this occurs, you have essentially lost all holding power---drive another screw next to it.
I looked at the driver bits inside the collars as best I could see and they looked quite "pointed" for Philips driver bits so I didn't think they were P2R's, but figured I'd try them. As soon as the screw head was near the paper and then barely making contact with it, the driver would cam out of the screw head. Drywall screws seem to be made of fairly decent steel considering where they are made and I discovered they pretty much trashed the gripping power of the driver bit, even with minimal cam out. I was very disappointed. I believe if the bit inside the collar were a P2R (Reduced) bit rather than a regular P2 bit, it would work much better. The "Big Red" power tool company's comparable item looked just about identical so I figured it was a toss up.
I only had one older, rather beat up P2R bit available but I switched to it, and along with it used some of my "screw grabbing" valve grinding compound lightly on the bit. It worked fantastic and I had no problem controlling the depth of the driven screw using an inexpensive cordless drill from a large importer of made-in-China tools.
Differences between P2 and P2R driver bits as far as I can deduce are:
P2 - Seems to be slightly more pointed, i.e., a narrower angle on the 4 blades, plus more pointed and perhaps longer such that it may 'bottom' in the screw head slightly early, thus reducing the blade-into-screw-head-grooves slightly?
P2R bits seem truncated, or shortened slightly at their tips (leaving a much more blunt, squared-off point) such that they don't seem to 'bottom' into the screw head. Therefore, more of the blades, which seem to be cut at a slightly wider angle, make contact with the matching grooves cut into the screw head for that purpose. My experience is that they grip drywall screws much better and are therefore much less likely to cam out (slip in the screw head which bungys up both the screw head and typically the driver bit also), particularly when driving screws into old, hardened Doug Fir studs and joists. I still prefer to touch a dab of abrasive compound to the bit about every 5 screws for insurance. A product called Screw Grab used to be available for that purpose but I can't find it anymore, so just bought a small tube of valve lapping compound which seems to work just great. Main thing is keep the driver straight in line with the screw.

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/construction/p2r-phillips-bit-what-is-it-13386-.htm

rbowman

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Oct 24, 2020, 6:45:09 PM10/24/20
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On 10/24/2020 04:15 PM, GARY HOLMGREN wrote:
> A product called Screw Grab used to be available for that purpose but I
> can't find it anymore, so just bought a small tube of valve lapping
> compound which seems to work just great.

http://www.screwgrab.com/screw-grab.html

Amazon and Walmart show it. I've got a couple of bottles I bought a few
years ago but I don't remember where. Ace?

Going the other way, I was skeptical but the Grabit screw extractors
work like a charm on stripped out Phillips or Torx screws. They're a lot
faster than drilling a pilot and using a conventional extractor,
particularly with smaller fasteners.

Ed Pawlowski

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Oct 24, 2020, 9:26:20 PM10/24/20
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On 10/24/2020 6:15 PM, GARY HOLMGREN wrote:
> I'm not an "expert" but have used many, many driver bits and have been
> looking for P2R bits locally but unable to find any.  Apparently a big
> box store 14 miles away has a few but driving fuel would triple the cost.
> I'm doing some sheet rock installation using drywall screws.

So you are doing a home project with drywall, paint, trim, and probably
a bunch of other stuff. Probably costly. A 28 mile round trip is maybe
a gallon and a half of gas, about $3.

Add another few bucks and take your wife out for coffee along they way
and enjoy some time together. Then do the job the right way.

Peeler

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Oct 25, 2020, 3:45:03 AM10/25/20
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On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 16:45:14 -0600, lowbrowwoman, the endlessly driveling,
troll-feeding, senile idiot, blabbered again:

> On 10/24/2020 04:15 PM, GARY HOLMGREN wrote:
>> A product called Screw Grab used to be available for that purpose but I
>> can't find it anymore, so just bought a small tube of valve lapping
>> compound which seems to work just great.
>
> http://www.screwgrab.com/screw-grab.html

You really got nothing better to do in your senile life, eh, senile
blabbermouth? LOL

RandyThomas

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Oct 16, 2021, 1:45:04 PM10/16/21
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No. Searching for uses and materials are completely different. Fuck Steves.
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