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How long is too long for felt paper to be left on the roof with no shingles?

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cwkc

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May 29, 2001, 12:44:14 AM5/29/01
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This might be a very dumb question but I don't know and I figured you guys
are used to answering dumb questions so here it goes.

The felt paper has been on the roof for about 4 days now but our contractor
says it doesn't look like the shingles will get put on for another week or
so. We had a hard rain today and the felt and OSB on the roof got soaked.
Should I worry about this or not? TIA

Chris


Matthew S. Whiting

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May 29, 2001, 6:35:31 AM5/29/01
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No, worrying won't change anything. Mine got rained on for 5 weeks
before shingles. It looked pretty bad, but once the shingles are on the
paper serves a very minor role.


Matt

Joe Barta

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May 29, 2001, 9:52:52 AM5/29/01
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cwkc wrote:

No need to be concerned unless several weeks have passed.

- Joe Barta

cwkc

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May 29, 2001, 12:38:07 PM5/29/01
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Thanks!


Matthew S. Whiting <whi...@epix.net> wrote in message
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cwkc

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May 29, 2001, 12:39:08 PM5/29/01
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I figured that was the case but I wasn't sure. Thanks for the info.


Joe Barta <jba...@apk.net> wrote in message
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dennis

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May 29, 2001, 12:43:33 PM5/29/01
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In a typical project like a housing tract, the roof is papered and roofing material stocked on roof to distribute the load to bearing walls before stocking and installation of drywall material. It is typical for the roof to be in this condition for 30-60 days while  other phases of the construction are completed. Over a Long (and I mean LONG) period of time the sun/heat will dry out the oil in the paper which gives it the water resistant property. Cold makes it brittle and wind can tear it.

oldand...@aol.com

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May 29, 2001, 9:23:00 PM5/29/01
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Shingles need to go on ASAP. Wind is the big factor..if it blows off
you have NO protection. Did I understand you to say that the roof
sheeting (OSB) got soaked? That stuff flakes in pieces when it gets
wet. Pitch a fit and either get the roof in the dry or get those
shingles on.

AAJW Lazenby

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May 30, 2001, 12:25:08 AM5/30/01
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The biggest concern with exposed building paper (felt) on the roof is the customer/home owner.  When he begins to loose faith, there is hell to pay following. 
 
Building paper flapping in the breeze causes hairline cracks in concrete, causes out of plumb rough openings, causes warped studs, causes leaks in the plumbing, causes colors that are wrong , causes an unhappy camper!

AAJW Lazenby

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May 30, 2001, 12:20:28 AM5/30/01
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A common misconception. The building paper (actually, the correct term is
building FELT, not paper) does NOT serve a minor roll. It is the primary
barrier for rainwater . . . not the shingles. Just think about clay or
concrete tile as an example. Those tiles wouldn't hold out weather alone.
They are there to protect the building paper from the sun, etc. Shingles
are the same . . . to a somewhat lesser degree.

However, the building paper (felt) can withstand a fairly considerable
exposure before serious damage. Less in hot climates under the sun. When
it starts blowing up and off, you've likely gone too long.


Matthew S. Whiting

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May 30, 2001, 1:05:59 PM5/30/01
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oldand...@aol.com wrote:
>
> Shingles need to go on ASAP. Wind is the big factor..if it blows off
> you have NO protection. Did I understand you to say that the roof
> sheeting (OSB) got soaked? That stuff flakes in pieces when it gets
> wet. Pitch a fit and either get the roof in the dry or get those
> shingles on.

How much building do you do?

Matt

Matthew S. Whiting

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May 30, 2001, 1:07:14 PM5/30/01
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Bull. I've seen buildings with shingles and no felt at all and they
were perfectly waterproof. People were building roofs with slate, clay,
shakes, long before felt came on the scene.


Matt

Joe Barta

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May 31, 2001, 10:56:59 AM5/31/01
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AAJW Lazenby wrote:

> A common misconception. The building paper (actually, the
> correct term is building FELT, not paper) does NOT serve a minor
> roll. It is the primary barrier for rainwater . . . not the
> shingles. Just think about clay or concrete tile as an example.
> Those tiles wouldn't hold out weather alone. They are there to
> protect the building paper from the sun, etc. Shingles are the
> same . . . to a somewhat lesser degree.

I disagree (respectfully). With some tile installations, the
underlayment is a primary barrier. Not so with asphalt shingles. If
this were true, roofs without felt would leak routinely. They don't.
Roofing felt (or paper... most is made of paper by the way) helps
keep the roof dry (more or less) until the shingles go on. It also
serves as a moisture barrier of sorts, and it provides a mediocre
secondary barrier in case of minor shingle damage or minor ice
backup.

It's role is rather minor. Claims have even been made that an asphalt
shingle roof may even be better off without felt. The debate rages
on, but those claims are not without merit IMO.


> However, the building paper (felt) can withstand a fairly
> considerable exposure before serious damage. Less in hot
> climates under the sun. When it starts blowing up and off,
> you've likely gone too long.

When building, felt's primary role is to keep water off the plywood
to limit warping. If the felt several weeks old and blowing off, the
felt itself is non-issue because it's so cheap to replace. The real
concern should be bumps and dips in the plywood sheathing (OSB is
less of a problem) and yet more water exposure of the subfloor.

- Joe Barta

Joe Barta

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May 31, 2001, 11:07:53 AM5/31/01
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AAJW Lazenby wrote:

>The biggest concern with exposed building paper (felt) on the roof
>is the customer/home owner. When he begins to loose faith, there
>is hell to pay following.

Agreed 100% An important point.

It's not so much what is, but what he may THINK it is.


>Building paper flapping in the breeze causes hairline cracks in
>concrete, causes out of plumb rough openings, causes warped studs,
>causes leaks in the plumbing, causes colors that are wrong ,
>causes an unhappy camper!

At first one may think you are being sarcastic, but there is much to
what you say.

A customer noticing minor problem A, may begin looking for other
problems. Many of these problems are quite insignificant and would
have gone unnoticed had the customer's faith in you remained
unshaken. Worse, the customer may retain the free services of a
friend "in the business" that will proceed to open more silly cans of
worms than have ever appeared in your worst dreams... all because of
a little felt flapping in the breeze...

- Joe Barta

andya...@earthlink.net

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May 31, 2001, 12:10:05 PM5/31/01
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On 31 May 2001 14:56:59 GMT, jba...@apk.net (Joe Barta) wrote:

Joe, on a related subject, have you noticed any difference in weather
resistance of different brands of OSB. My very unscientific
observation is that Weyerhaeuser withstands rain better than
Louisiana-Pacific. It seems the Louisiana-Pacific has more sawdust
filler. I have no experience with other brands.


>
>When building, felt's primary role is to keep water off the plywood
>to limit warping. If the felt several weeks old and blowing off, the
>felt itself is non-issue because it's so cheap to replace. The real
>concern should be bumps and dips in the plywood sheathing (OSB is
>less of a problem) and yet more water exposure of the subfloor.
>
>- Joe Barta

Prexcription without diagnosis is malpractice, in medicine and mechanics.

Joe Barta

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May 31, 2001, 1:51:02 PM5/31/01
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>Joe, on a related subject, have you noticed any difference in
>weather resistance of different brands of OSB. My very
>unscientific observation is that Weyerhaeuser withstands rain
>better than Louisiana-Pacific. It seems the Louisiana-Pacific has
>more sawdust filler. I have no experience with other brands.

Haven't noticed anything between brands.

- Joe Barta

Tommy

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May 31, 2001, 3:28:16 PM5/31/01
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Ever wonder why shingle manufacturers do not require building paper under
shingles? My roofer has talked me out of installing it; his feeling is that
in some cases building paper actually causes premature problems.

I find a similar mindset with Tyvek vs. tarpaper under brick. Many insist
that Tyvek is the best way to go, yet others say the right way is tarpaper.
Go figure.

"Joe Barta" <jba...@apk.net> wrote in message

news:Xns90B26F5D863...@206.183.6.17...

Travis Anton

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May 31, 2001, 7:11:44 PM5/31/01
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In article <nni8htkjbbch6eboh...@4ax.com>,
oldand...@aol.com wrote:

> Shingles need to go on ASAP. Wind is the big factor..if it blows off
> you have NO protection. Did I understand you to say that the roof
> sheeting (OSB) got soaked? That stuff flakes in pieces when it gets
> wet. Pitch a fit and either get the roof in the dry or get those
> shingles on.
>

Out of curiosity, because I'd used some exterior rated OSB scraps as
temporary shims while jacking up the back of a house, i.e. they were
where they were definitely going to get wet, I put some scraps of it
submerged in a bucket of water. It's been soaking months now, and no
sign of any delamitation. I was impressed.

Also got a so called shed that came wit one of my houses that's been
walled with nothing but unprotected OSB for over four years, and the
thing is probably at least ten years old. Looks like hell now, but I
don't think it's any worse for wear other than fading in the sun. It
looked like hell the day whoever built it, too.

Not that those are any sort of scientific assertions, but that stuff
really is lot sturdier than you think.

--
Travis Anton, BoxTop Software, Inc. - http://www.boxtopsoft.com

"BoxTop Software's ProJPEG plug-in consistently produces JPEG files
that are routinely 50% smaller than Photoshop" - Mac Art Design

Joe Barta

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Jun 1, 2001, 7:57:14 AM6/1/01
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>oldand...@aol.com wrote:
>
>> Shingles need to go on ASAP. Wind is the big factor..if it blows
>> off you have NO protection.

Felt isn't the greatest protection in the world to begin with. Your
going down a panicky road that you don't need to be on.

>> Did I understand you to say that the
>> roof sheeting (OSB) got soaked? That stuff flakes in pieces when
>> it gets wet.

Your (lack of) experience is showing. OSB is actually quite weather
resistant (short term). It won't fall apart on the roof if it gets
rained on a few times.

>> Pitch a fit and either get the roof in the dry or
>> get those shingles on.

Or be patient and keep from looking foolish.

- Joe Barta

weymouthco...@gmail.com

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Apr 3, 2017, 5:37:36 PM4/3/17
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I gotta disagree as well we have left osb outside on site for months at a time the osb is coated for temporary weather protection. I've left it stacked and uncovered probably longer than I should have and never had trouble. The only areas that "swell" are the cut pieces and even that would need more than one rainstorm

jdwillia...@gmail.com

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Dec 1, 2018, 4:01:49 PM12/1/18
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You shouldn't patch with osb at all it's junk...
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