Tangzhong recipes

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Graham

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May 22, 2021, 5:36:19 PM5/22/21
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I'm a fan of the tangzhong method when making dinner rolls and hamburger
buns. I watched the following and although the sugar content looks a bit
high, I will be trying these recipes in the near future.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MV8QYd5sOg

The recipes are given in the New York Times links beneath the video. The
recipes are "bilingual" i.e., metric weights and antediluvial cup
measurements.

Boron Elgar

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May 22, 2021, 7:16:30 PM5/22/21
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I had just read this article yesterday! Interesting technique.

Graham

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May 22, 2021, 8:49:27 PM5/22/21
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The recipe I have been using is not so rich.
This recipe is by Kim-Joy Hewlett who was runner-up in the Great British
Bake Off in 2018. I've edited it as the original used the recipe to make
the buns in the form of pigs to float in soup!! I just use it to make
hamburger buns for my son's family.

For the tangzhong
25g strong white bread flour
100ml water

For the dough
The tangzhong paste
160ml whole milk
50g melted unsalted butter
1 large egg
15g sugar
1 tsp salt
420g strong white bread flour
7g yeast

To make the tangzhong paste, whisk the flour with the water in a pan
until smooth. Place the pan on a low heat and stir continuously using a
spatula, until it has a pudding-like consistency. Transfer to a bowl,
cover with clingfilm and place in the freezer for 10 minutes to cool.
Meanwhile, warm the milk and melt the butter. Add to a large bowl with
the sugar and salt. Take the tangzhong out of the freezer and add to the
bowl along with the egg. Whisk together.
Add the flour and yeast. If using a mixer, allow the machine to knead
for 10 minutes with the dough-hook attachment. If working by hand, use a
wooden spoon to combine everything into a ball of dough, then turn out
on to a floured surface. Knead by hand for about 10-15 minutes. Place
the dough into a lightly oiled large bowl and cover with clingfilm.
Leave to rise until it has doubled in size.
When risen, knock back and divide into 8-10 portions. Cover with lightly
oiled clingfilm and leave to rise until they have doubled in size.
Heat the oven to 180C (fan-assisted). When the bread has risen, brush
with a lightly beaten egg and bake for about 15 minutes.

Graham

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May 22, 2021, 8:51:38 PM5/22/21
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On 2021-05-22 6:49 p.m., Graham wrote:
> On 2021-05-22 5:16 p.m., Boron Elgar wrote:
>> On Sat, 22 May 2021 15:36:14 -0600, Graham <g.st...@shaw.ca> wrote:
>>
>>> I'm a fan of the tangzhong method when making dinner rolls and hamburger
>>> buns. I watched the following and although the sugar content looks a bit
>>> high, I will be trying these recipes in the near future.
>>>
>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MV8QYd5sOg
>>>
>>> The recipes are given in the New York Times links beneath the video. The
>>> recipes are "bilingual" i.e., metric weights and antediluvial cup
>>> measurements.
>>
>>
>> I had just read this article yesterday! Interesting technique.
>>
> The recipe I have been using is not so rich.
> This recipe is by Kim-Joy Hewlett who was runner-up in the Great British
> Bake Off in 2018. I've edited it as the original used the recipe to make
> the buns in the form of pigs to float in soup!! I just use it to make
> hamburger buns for my son's family.
>
> For the tangzhong
> 25g strong white bread flour
> 100ml water
>
> For the dough
> The tangzhong paste
> 160ml whole milk
> 50g melted unsalted butter
> 1 large egg (US/Canada XL)
> 15g sugar
> 1 tsp salt
> 420g strong white bread flour
> 7g yeast
>
> To make the tangzhong paste, whisk the flour with the water in a pan
> until smooth. Place the pan on a low heat and stir continuously using a
> spatula, until it has a pudding-like consistency. Transfer to a bowl,
> cover with clingfilm and place in the freezer for 10 minutes to cool.
> Meanwhile, warm the milk and melt the butter. Add to a large bowl with
> the sugar and salt. Take the tangzhong out of the freezer and add to the
> bowl along with the egg. Whisk together.
> Add the flour and yeast. If using a mixer, allow the machine to knead
> for 10 minutes with the dough-hook attachment. If working by hand, use a
> wooden spoon to combine everything into a ball of dough, then turn out
> on to a floured surface. Knead by hand for about 10-15 minutes. Place
> the dough into a lightly oiled large bowl and cover with clingfilm.
> Leave to rise until it has doubled in size.
> When risen, knock back and divide into 8-10 portions. Cover with lightly
> oiled clingfilm and leave to rise until they have doubled in size.
> Heat the oven to 180C (fan-assisted). When the bread has risen, brush
> with a lightly beaten egg and bake for about 15 minutes.

Note the UK large egg is US/Canada Extra Large, but I don't think it
would make much difference.

Boron Elgar

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May 23, 2021, 12:31:10 AM5/23/21
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I have no egg loyalty.
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