Another stab at slashing! ;/

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Sky

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Oct 30, 2008, 10:56:59 PM10/30/08
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Grrrrr!!! I've had the dickens of a time slashing (or rather not
slashing) the dough for baguettes before I put it in the oven to bake.
I still haven't been able to learn when the best time is to slash the
dough before it's baked. So far, I've slashed late after the last rise,
and that sure doesn't work for me. The dough 'fell' after I slashed it
unsuccessfully. Soooo, when is the prime time to slash the dough for
baguettes? Why and why not? TIA. So far, I'm better off not slashing
at all!

Sky, who came across a seeminly good looking paring knife today for
slashing

P.S. I acquired a digital kitchen scale today!!!! So maybe using that
will help, too <G>!

P.P.S. I still need to practice with 'raw' dough to learn slashing.

--
Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice

Barry Harmon

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Oct 31, 2008, 12:16:40 AM10/31/08
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Sky <skyh...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM> wrote in news:490A73FA.5FB0
@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM:

> Grrrrr!!! I've had the dickens of a time slashing (or rather not
> slashing) the dough for baguettes before I put it in the oven to bake.
> I still haven't been able to learn when the best time is to slash the
> dough before it's baked. So far, I've slashed late after the last
rise,
> and that sure doesn't work for me. The dough 'fell' after I slashed
it
> unsuccessfully. Soooo, when is the prime time to slash the dough for
> baguettes? Why and why not? TIA. So far, I'm better off not
slashing
> at all!
>
> Sky, who came across a seeminly good looking paring knife today for
> slashing
>
> P.S. I acquired a digital kitchen scale today!!!! So maybe using that
> will help, too <G>!
>
> P.P.S. I still need to practice with 'raw' dough to learn slashing.
>

Get yourself a kitchen steel.

Just before you put the dough in the oven,

Give your knife a few swipes on the steel

And then slash the baguette three times:

The slashes should be equal length.

Hold the knife at an angle, 30 degrees will do

Put the first slash in the center of the loaf,

Put the other two on the ends, overlapping the first a bit.

That should do it.

Barry

Dee Randall

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Oct 31, 2008, 9:26:04 AM10/31/08
to

"Sky" <skyh...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM> wrote in message
news:490A73...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM...

> Grrrrr!!! I've had the dickens of a time slashing (or rather not
> slashing) the dough for baguettes before I put it in the oven to bake.
> I still haven't been able to learn when the best time is to slash the
> dough before it's baked. So far, I've slashed late after the last rise,
> and that sure doesn't work for me. The dough 'fell' after I slashed it
> unsuccessfully.


It is my experience that when the dough falls greatly after slashing, that
if you hurriedly will put it into the oven, it will rise to the occasion.

Dee Dee


Sky

unread,
Oct 31, 2008, 10:19:13 AM10/31/08
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Barry Harmon wrote:
>
> Sky <skyh...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM> wrote in news:490A73FA.5FB0
> @NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM:
>
> > Grrrrr!!! I've had the dickens of a time slashing (or rather not
> > slashing) the dough for baguettes before I put it in the oven to bake.
> > I still haven't been able to learn when the best time is to slash the
> > dough before it's baked. So far, I've slashed late after the last
> rise,
> > and that sure doesn't work for me. The dough 'fell' after I slashed
> it
> > unsuccessfully. Soooo, when is the prime time to slash the dough for
> > baguettes? Why and why not? TIA. So far, I'm better off not
> slashing
> > at all!
> >
> > Sky, who came across a seemingly good looking paring knife today for

> > slashing
> >
> > P.S. I acquired a digital kitchen scale today!!!! So maybe using that
> > will help, too <G>!
> >
> > P.P.S. I still need to practice with 'raw' dough to learn slashing.
> >
>
> Get yourself a kitchen steel.
>
> Just before you put the dough in the oven,
>
> Give your knife a few swipes on the steel
>
> And then slash the baguette three times:
>
> The slashes should be equal length.
>
> Hold the knife at an angle, 30 degrees will do
>
> Put the first slash in the center of the loaf,
>
> Put the other two on the ends, overlapping the first a bit.
>
> That should do it.
>
> Barry

Thanks, and that's exactly what I did! I suppose I'm just a klutz
(sigh). I am rather graceless. But, I will continue to endeavor.

Sky

Janet Bostwick

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Oct 31, 2008, 2:23:42 PM10/31/08
to
Sky wrote:
> Grrrrr!!! I've had the dickens of a time slashing (or rather not
> slashing) the dough for baguettes before I put it in the oven to bake.
> I still haven't been able to learn when the best time is to slash the
> dough before it's baked. So far, I've slashed late after the last
> rise, and that sure doesn't work for me. The dough 'fell' after I
> slashed it unsuccessfully. Soooo, when is the prime time to slash
> the dough for baguettes? Why and why not? TIA. So far, I'm better
> off not slashing at all!
>
> Sky, who came across a seeminly good looking paring knife today for
> slashing
>
> P.S. I acquired a digital kitchen scale today!!!! So maybe using that
> will help, too <G>!
>
> P.P.S. I still need to practice with 'raw' dough to learn slashing.
>
Maybe you are letting the dough rise too high before slashing? I don't know
how far the loaf fell after you slashed, but it is a possibility that you
slashed too late. As Dee says, the loaf will rise in the oven if you get it
in quickly. Try to keep the rising loaf on the cool side as it slashes
easier then.
Janet


Barry Harmon

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Oct 31, 2008, 9:17:07 PM10/31/08
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"Janet Bostwick" <nos...@cableone.net> wrote in
news:adednQkZgfaw0JbU...@supernews.com:

Could Sky have let the loaf rise a bit too long?

Maybe reduce the final rise time by 15 or 20 minutes.

Barry

MichaelJ

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Nov 1, 2008, 7:14:11 AM11/1/08
to
For artisan type breads (66% hydration and higher) you need to handle
the final dough at about 3/4 proof. If you let these doughs fully
proof it won't matter if you slash or not, the dough will collapse and
will not fully recover, even in the most perfect oven. If you place
the 3/4 proofed dough on your peel and then slash it will deflate some
but when you load it into your oven and add steam you should get a get
a good oven spring. I don't do a panic rush at this point - you'll
generally screw it up if you're in too much of a rush. I load 16
batards or boules (1 1/2 LB each) in one oven load and slash them, on
peels, a the same time and then load them in succession - gently (not
timid) handling and 3/4 proofed is the key.

The condition of the surface of the dough is important. If it's wet
and sticky it's hard to slash. If it's just dry to the touch (but
still supple) it will cut so much cleaner. Don't cover the dough for
final proofing too tightly or you'll trap too much moisture - it's a
balancing act to get it not too wet but not dry.

You can certainly slash well with a sharp knife - I did more or less
well for years, but using a razor blade attached to a lame is so much
better and the success rate is way higher. Learning to use a lame is
a pretty easy. Do not buy one with a plastic handle. You can not
change the blade in most of them so their life is limited. You can
get a steel lame from King Arthur Flour or San Francisco Baking
Institute.

A full size baguette (14 ounces of dough and 26-inches long) usually
has five slashes. Smaller ones, demi-baguettes, usually three
slashes.

Good luck,
Michael

Michael & Sandy Jubinsky
Stone Turtle
Baking & Cooking School
173 Howitt Road
P. O. Box 760
Lyman, Maine 04002-0760
Tel: 207-324-7558
Cell: 207-459-0567
Email: in...@stoneturtlebaking.com
http://www.stoneturtlebaking.com

Dee Randall

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Nov 1, 2008, 8:48:30 AM11/1/08
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"MichaelJ" <mic...@stoneturtlebaking.com> wrote in message
news:e4cc8fef-06f4-43a7-8248-


> You can certainly slash well with a sharp knife - I did more or less
> well for years, but using a razor blade attached to a lame is so much
> better and the success rate is way higher. Learning to use a lame is
> a pretty easy. Do not buy one with a plastic handle. You can not
> change the blade in most of them so their life is limited. You can
> get a steel lame from King Arthur Flour or San Francisco Baking
> Institute.
>


> Good luck,
> Michael


I've bought two lames from KingArthur (their $6.95 ones with the attached
blades to a plastic handle). I've had no luck with them; they seemed too
dull right from the start. I just bought a new "Matfer" one a month ago and
it is the same.

Since the posting here from Mike at San Francisc Baking Institute, I
ordered two razor blade holders. However, they aren't in stock, and I'm
waiting for them to come on the boat from France.

Thanks for your advice.

Dee Dee


Janet Bostwick

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Nov 1, 2008, 9:49:38 AM11/1/08
to

I've been tempted to order lame and blades from them for years but the blade
order is so huge. Let me know what the holder portion is like and how it is
to work with -- one non-pro to another non-pro ;o}
Janet


Dee Randall

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Nov 1, 2008, 2:09:38 PM11/1/08
to

"Janet Bostwick" <nos...@cableone.net> wrote in message
news:Gb6dndtLXZfvw5HU...@supernews.com...

>
As Mike (of SFBaking) suggested here, buy a small pack elsewhere to try it
out, or buy a bulk of razor blades elsewhere. I see Amazon has a bulk of
blades (free shipping.) The lame for use with the razor blade at SFB is
$6, so I bought two -- that's just me (one might break, :-)))

Joe, a guy there, said that he would put a razor blade in the lame for me to
see how it is suppose to fit; I hope he remembers.

Shipping hurts me everytime, so I bought a couple of bannetons and a brush
to fill up the shipping cost. I didn't really need them, but I've been
thinking about a 'good' one for some time. Their price is reasonable.

I'll let you know when I use them, Janet.
Dee Dee

lamont cranston

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Nov 2, 2008, 12:57:16 AM11/2/08
to
so ok...ever notice how lots of "artisan bread" has flour on the surface?
try giving your loaf a little sprinkle of flour then a quick wipe with your
hand and THEN slash. works wonders for some reason..good luck

"Sky" <skyh...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM> wrote in message
news:490A73...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM...

Dave Fouchey

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Nov 2, 2008, 1:07:25 PM11/2/08
to
Mostly a lurker here but I did come across a rather interesting
version of a blade to use as a lame, a utility/box cutter from
Derma-Safe. Simple, sharp, and worked well.

http://www.derma-safe.com/folding-utility-knife.html

Of course you would end up having to buy a lot of them to get any..

Dave Fouchey
Florence, SC

Reunite Gondwanaland (Mary Shafer)

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Nov 5, 2008, 12:07:32 AM11/5/08
to
On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 13:07:25 -0500, Dave Fouchey <dfou...@sc.rr.com>
wrote:

> Mostly a lurker here but I did come across a rather interesting
> version of a blade to use as a lame, a utility/box cutter from
> Derma-Safe. Simple, sharp, and worked well.
>
> http://www.derma-safe.com/folding-utility-knife.html
>
> Of course you would end up having to buy a lot of them to get any..

Down at the bottom, just before the part about retail sales, there's a
link to a retailer who sells them individually for $1.50 plus postage,
in black only.

I personally use a Kyocera ceramic knife to slash my dough. I don't
use it for much else because I'm afraid I'll drop it on the tile floor
and break it, but it's got a beautiful edge on it.

Mary "I broke another ceramic knife (different brand) that way"
--
Mary Shafer Retired aerospace research engineer
We didn't just do weird stuff at Dryden, we wrote reports about it.
reunite....@gmail.com or mil...@qnet.com
Visit my blog at http://thedigitalknitter.blogspot.com/

Barry Harmon

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Nov 5, 2008, 9:26:34 AM11/5/08
to
"Reunite Gondwanaland (Mary Shafer)" <reunite....@gmail.com> wrote
in news:kp92h4h0nn477i5qh...@4ax.com:

> On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 13:07:25 -0500, Dave Fouchey <dfou...@sc.rr.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Mostly a lurker here but I did come across a rather interesting
>> version of a blade to use as a lame, a utility/box cutter from
>> Derma-Safe. Simple, sharp, and worked well.
>>
>> http://www.derma-safe.com/folding-utility-knife.html
>>
>> Of course you would end up having to buy a lot of them to get any..
>
> Down at the bottom, just before the part about retail sales, there's a
> link to a retailer who sells them individually for $1.50 plus postage,
> in black only.
>
> I personally use a Kyocera ceramic knife to slash my dough. I don't
> use it for much else because I'm afraid I'll drop it on the tile floor
> and break it, but it's got a beautiful edge on it.
>
> Mary "I broke another ceramic knife (different brand) that way"

You can get the same edge a lot cheaper and with less worry about
breaking by going to Knife Works and buying the cheap Victorinox paring
knives and then using a steel to keep them sharp. The steel will give
them a razor edge that holds up pretty well, since these are stainless
blades, not high carbon.

http://www.knifeworks.com/forschnerparingknives.aspx

Another site with a better selection

http://www.thefind.com/kitchen/info-paring-knife-wavy-edge

Barry

Boron Elgar

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Nov 5, 2008, 3:07:00 PM11/5/08
to
On 05 Nov 2008 14:26:34 GMT, Barry Harmon <john...@optonline.net>
wrote:

With all my fancy-schmancy knives, I still find myself reaching for
one of my inexpensive Forschner paring knives to do some simple
tasks. Great little workhorses.

Boron
>Barry

John B

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Nov 8, 2008, 1:44:16 PM11/8/08
to
I use a cheap single edged razor blade. Works great for me. Buy them
in boxes of 100 at home improvement stores. They're used for cleaning
paint off of window glass.

Sky

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Nov 9, 2008, 3:33:22 PM11/9/08
to

Yep, I've tried using those types of blades, too! I even went to the
beauty supply store and bought extra-long single-sided blades to use,
without much success. I'm still stabbing at slashing however, albeit
not literally <G>.

Sky

The Cook

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Nov 9, 2008, 4:04:11 PM11/9/08
to
On Sun, 09 Nov 2008 14:33:22 -0600, Sky <skyh...@NOsbcglobal.SnPeAtM>
wrote:

>John B wrote:
>>
>> I use a cheap single edged razor blade. Works great for me. Buy them
>> in boxes of 100 at home improvement stores. They're used for cleaning
>> paint off of window glass.
>
>Yep, I've tried using those types of blades, too! I even went to the
>beauty supply store and bought extra-long single-sided blades to use,
>without much success. I'm still stabbing at slashing however, albeit
>not literally <G>.
>
>Sky


I wonder if the razor holders that the beauticians and barbers use
would work? I have never looked at one carefully. Maybe next time I
go to the beauty shop I'll take a look at one.

Sky

unread,
Nov 9, 2008, 4:36:37 PM11/9/08
to

The only 'holder' I saw at the beauty supply store was sort of
'serated', a trimmer I believe? It wasn't suitable. So I just bought
the blades only. But, I'd like to find a holder for it; I'll keep
looking maybe.

Dave Bell

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Nov 9, 2008, 6:03:10 PM11/9/08
to
Sky wrote:

>> I wonder if the razor holders that the beauticians and barbers use
>> would work? I have never looked at one carefully. Maybe next time I
>> go to the beauty shop I'll take a look at one.
>
> The only 'holder' I saw at the beauty supply store was sort of
> 'serated', a trimmer I believe? It wasn't suitable. So I just bought
> the blades only. But, I'd like to find a holder for it; I'll keep
> looking maybe.

"Thinner", probably

Reunite Gondwanaland (Mary Shafer)

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Nov 15, 2008, 12:19:38 AM11/15/08
to
On 05 Nov 2008 14:26:34 GMT, Barry Harmon <john...@optonline.net>
wrote:

> "Reunite Gondwanaland (Mary Shafer)" <reunite....@gmail.com> wrote

> in news:kp92h4h0nn477i5qh...@4ax.com:
>
> > On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 13:07:25 -0500, Dave Fouchey <dfou...@sc.rr.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> Mostly a lurker here but I did come across a rather interesting
> >> version of a blade to use as a lame, a utility/box cutter from
> >> Derma-Safe. Simple, sharp, and worked well.
> >>
> >> http://www.derma-safe.com/folding-utility-knife.html
> >>
> >> Of course you would end up having to buy a lot of them to get any..
> >
> > Down at the bottom, just before the part about retail sales, there's a
> > link to a retailer who sells them individually for $1.50 plus postage,
> > in black only.
> >
> > I personally use a Kyocera ceramic knife to slash my dough. I don't
> > use it for much else because I'm afraid I'll drop it on the tile floor
> > and break it, but it's got a beautiful edge on it.
> >
> > Mary "I broke another ceramic knife (different brand) that way"
>
> You can get the same edge a lot cheaper and with less worry about
> breaking by going to Knife Works and buying the cheap Victorinox paring
> knives and then using a steel to keep them sharp. The steel will give
> them a razor edge that holds up pretty well, since these are stainless
> blades, not high carbon.

I love my Victorinox paring knives, all six styles, but the best
paring knife I own is the Chicago 102S. It's got a blade like a
miniature boning knife and is very handy. Still, I like the Kyocera
ceramic knife for dough slashing. I think it's partly the chef blade,
which is a lot wider than a paring knife. The blade is very rigid,
too, which I think makes it better for this task.

Mary "I've got a lot of Bictorinox knives and steels"

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