Gluten for oatmeal

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Peter Flynn

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Feb 2, 2021, 5:55:34 AM2/2/21
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Ground oats need gluten to make bread, but how gluten much per
pound of oat flour?

Hard to find with a web search because of the number of sites
telling me that oats are gluten-free.

P
--
"Man shall not live by bread alone, but must have peanut butter."
[James A Garfield]


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Graham

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Feb 2, 2021, 10:47:46 AM2/2/21
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On Tue, 2 Feb 2021 10:55:35 +0000 (GMT), Peter Flynn wrote:

> Ground oats need gluten to make bread, but how gluten much per
> pound of oat flour?
>
> Hard to find with a web search because of the number of sites
> telling me that oats are gluten-free.
>
> P

Why not match the % of bread flour. I.e., try 12-13% of the oat weight.
I'd be interested to learn of the results of your experiments. Whenever
I've added a significant quantity of oats to a bread, it has come out with
the texture of plum pudding:-)

bob prohaska

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Feb 2, 2021, 2:35:21 PM2/2/21
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FWIW, I tried making bread with durum wheat flour and 10% "vital wheat
gluten" (quotes as I'm not sure what's _vital_ about the gluten).

The result was reasonably good. The rise was only slightly taller
than without the gluten, but the bread had a decent blow and was
quite good to eat. The texture improved more than the appearance.
With no gluten at all the same recipe yielded an edible brick.
Extra water equal to the weight of gluten was added as well, more
might be helpful.

It did have a trace of "sponge rubber" mouthfeel when eaten without
toasting, but under normal circumstances seems perfectly acceptable.
No harm done to flavor.

I too searched for how much gluten to use and found a wide range of
values, from a teaspoon to a tablespoon per cup of flour (or maybe
it was per loaf, sources were often unclear. The 10% figure was picked
on little more than a whim. I'd guess it's at the upper limit, based
on the finished crumb texture. Unless you're aiming for edible seat
cushions.

One added question would be the effect of adding egg in place of
some or all of the gluten. I gather egg proteins play an important
role in pasta, but I'm unclear how/if it'd be relevant to yeast
bread.

Thanks for reading, and any more ideas.

bob prohaska

US Janet

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Feb 2, 2021, 4:57:54 PM2/2/21
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This is from The Ultimate Guide to Oatflour
"CAN I USE OAT FLOUR INSTEAD OF ALL PURPOSE FLOUR?
In comparison to all the other gluten free flours, in my experience
oat flour behaves the most similarly to wheat flour. However regarding
substituting a recipe that calls for all wheat flour– it depends on
what you’re baking and the recipe. Like mentioned above, denser baked
goods tend to do better with all oat flour versus baked goods with a
fluffy crumb like cakes. And since there is no gluten, you will
definitely need a binder due to its crumbly nature. So generally
speaking, I do not recommend substituting all of the wheat flour for
oat flour because it tends to get gummy and dense if not used in the
right liquid to dry ratios. Instead, start with recipes that use just
oat flour intentionally like these mug cakes, muffins and cookies.

HOW MUCH OAT FLOUR DO I SUBSTITUTE FOR WHITE FLOUR?
If you’re keen on replacing some of the flour with oat flour, start by
swapping 25%-30% of the total amount and experiment from there. "

https://okonomikitchen.com/ultimate-guide-to-oat-flour/

Janet US

Peter Flynn

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Feb 2, 2021, 7:01:48 PM2/2/21
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On 02/02/2021 15:47, Graham wrote:
> On Tue, 2 Feb 2021 10:55:35 +0000 (GMT), Peter Flynn wrote:
>
>> Ground oats need gluten to make bread, but how gluten much per
>> pound of oat flour?
>
> Why not match the % of bread flour. I.e., try 12-13% of the oat weight.

Thanks, very useful percentage.

> I'd be interested to learn of the results of your experiments. Whenever
> I've added a significant quantity of oats to a bread, it has come out with
> the texture of plum pudding:-)

I had oatmeal bread once long ago, I think in Cranks' restaurant in
Dartington, and it was as light as a half white, half wholewheat loaf.
But yes, my impression is that it's usually soggy.


On 02/02/2021 19:35, bob prohaska wrote:
> FWIW, I tried making bread with durum wheat flour and 10% "vital
> wheat gluten" (quotes as I'm not sure what's _vital_ about the
> gluten).
I have no idea why they don't just call it "gluten".

> I too searched for how much gluten to use and found a wide range of
> values, from a teaspoon to a tablespoon per cup of flour

I have had problems with Odlums bread flour in my bread machine of late,
with the loaf sinking after baking. One tbsp gluten per 500g flour has
fixed that, but I didn't know how to extrapolate that to dealing with a
flour that has basically no gluten at all.

> Unless you're aiming for edible seat cushions.

:-)

> One added question would be the effect of adding egg in place of some
> or all of the gluten. I gather egg proteins play an important role in
> pasta, but I'm unclear how/if it'd be relevant to yeast bread.
More like brioche, I would imagine.


On 02/02/2021 21:57, US Janet wrote:

> This is from The Ultimate Guide to Oatflour

Thank you — I hadn't come across that one.

> [...] So generally speaking, I do not recommend substituting all of
> the wheat flour for oat flour because it tends to get gummy and dense
> if not used in the right liquid to dry ratios.
That's what I need to test.

Thank you all

Peter

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