'The Mist' into a movie?!!

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Richard Florio

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Jun 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/28/96
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Ben Vincent from Houston mentioned something about 'the Mist' being
in
production. Is this true? Who is Frank Durabont? A director?
I always thought that the Mist could make an excellent
Movie....looking forward to it if it is true!!!


Rich F. in Long Island, NY.

"I'm really totally together. I even think I should be."

Syd Barrett


web-server-account

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Jun 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/28/96
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Richard Florio (teaf...@worldnet.att.net) wrote:
: Ben Vincent from Houston mentioned something about 'the Mist' being

: in
: production. Is this true? Who is Frank Durabont? A director?
: I always thought that the Mist could make an excellent
: Movie....looking forward to it if it is true!!!

Why do people insist on calling me Ben? That's the second time
in two days? Am I not typing my v's hard enough?

Frank Darabont first came to King's attention when he did a
30-minute movie of the Night Shift short story "The Woman in
the Room" (available on video paired with "The Boogeyman".
Darabont did this as a film school project and acquired the
limited rights to do this from King for $1.00. King was
extremely impressed with this dramatization, especially
since this story is so close to him.

Darabont later produced a script for "Rita Hayworth and
Shawshank Redemption" which King said would never get produced
by Hollywood because it was so good. Well, lo and behold, "The
Shawshank Redemption" was produced almost exactly as Darabont
had scripted it and went on to become an acclaimed movie.

Darabont is supposed to be working on "The Mist", but I
have not heard that it is anywhere beyond the pre-production
stage.

--
Bev Vincent
Houston, TX

Mike Stewart

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Jul 1, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/1/96
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Gee three directorial projects, all of them based on King's
stuff,.......................... I wonder who his favorite author is?

David Evan Holcomb

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Jul 1, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/1/96
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I sure hope it happens! That was one heck of a great story! I like to
guess what the opening song might be-like the Stand mini-series was
Seasons Dont Fear the Reaper-a good choice. Would this one be Misty?
Hmmm...
David
=Has anyone seen my sanity?=

Cafe

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Jul 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/3/96
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In article <4r7edp$k...@dfw-ixnews3.ix.netcom.com>,
dav...@ix.netcom.com(David Evan Holcomb) wrote:

> In <4r79m3$l...@alpha.sky.net> mik...@sky.net (Mike Stewart) writes:
> >
> >In article <4r0oo2$8...@uuneo.neosoft.com>, b...@msc.com wrote:
> >>Richard Florio (teaf...@worldnet.att.net) wrote:
> >>: Ben Vincent from Houston mentioned something about 'the Mist'
> being
> >>: in

[Kingsnip]

> >>Bev Vincent
> >>Houston, TX
> >
> >
> >Gee three directorial projects, all of them based on King's
> >stuff,.......................... I wonder who his favorite author is?
>
>
> I sure hope it happens! That was one heck of a great story! I like to
> guess what the opening song might be-like the Stand mini-series was
> Seasons Dont Fear the Reaper-a good choice. Would this one be Misty?
> Hmmm...
> David
> =Has anyone seen my sanity?=

SKOobs:

I hope so too..perhaps with the help of the eefects team from ILM , et
al..that worked on Jurrassic Park...I would love to see

Bill Paxton OR Tim Robbins - as the Dad ( Forgive me - haven't read it
in
a long time)
Kathy Bates or Della Reese - as the woman in bright yellow screaming for
sacrifice
--
" I desire therefore that the men pray everywhere, lifting up holy hands, without wrath and doubting;" - I Timothy 2:8

"Walkin,'Toot said. "Walkin again, walkin again, yes sir, walkin on the Green Mile." _ sk, GM2

Maura Hart

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Jul 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/10/96
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Sickleweed wrote:
>
> Cafe (cwor...@coe.drexel.edu) wrote:
>
> : I hope so too..perhaps with the help of the eefects team from ILM , et

> : al..that worked on Jurrassic Park...I would love to see
> :
> : Bill Paxton OR Tim Robbins - as the Dad ( Forgive me - haven't read it
> : in
>
> Yes! Bill Paxton for the lead (forgive me also since it's also been
> awhile since I last read that story! Still my favorite tho!), OR how
> about Bruce Campbell? I can totally imagine either one of them playing
> the dad!
>
> Sickleweed
>
> : a long time)

> : Kathy Bates or Della Reese - as the woman in bright yellow screaming for
>

<snip long sig>

My vote would be for Bruce. Paxton is OK but I think I've reached the
saturation point.

I really like The Mist. Here is Nova Scotia (very similar to Maine) we
get alot of fog. I have to travel a bridge over Halifax harbour everyday
to get to work. Sometimes the half the bridge is covered with fog and I
wonder, as I get close to that part of the bridge, what waits on the
other side. Will I come out of the fog in Halifax or some other place?
Will the bridge end and I'll end up in he harbour?
--
Maura

" Ring around the rosie
Pocket full of posies
Ashes, ashes, we all FALL DOWN " -- nursery rhyme

Sickleweed

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Jul 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/12/96
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Cafe (cwor...@coe.drexel.edu) wrote:

: I hope so too..perhaps with the help of the eefects team from ILM , et
: al..that worked on Jurrassic Park...I would love to see
:
: Bill Paxton OR Tim Robbins - as the Dad ( Forgive me - haven't read it
: in

Yes! Bill Paxton for the lead (forgive me also since it's also been
awhile since I last read that story! Still my favorite tho!), OR how
about Bruce Campbell? I can totally imagine either one of them playing
the dad!

Sickleweed

: a long time)
: Kathy Bates or Della Reese - as the woman in bright yellow screaming for

: sacrifice


: --
: " I desire therefore that the men pray everywhere, lifting up holy hands, without wrath and doubting;" - I Timothy 2:8

: "Walkin,'Toot said. "Walkin again, walkin again, yes sir, walkin on the Green Mile." _ sk, GM2

--
Sickleweed
**********
Campaign Chairperson of the Trinity Chamber of Commerce along with Angela B.
It's NOT too late for Salvation; SAVE American Gothic!
To find out how, please e-mail me.


Sickleweed

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Jul 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/13/96
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Maura Hart (ha...@tuns.ca) wrote:

: <snip long sig>

: My vote would be for Bruce. Paxton is OK but I think I've reached the
: saturation point.

Well, i know I'll be happy if either of them gets the lead should the
story be made into a movie. =) It doesn't really matter which one.

: I really like The Mist. Here is Nova Scotia (very similar to Maine) we

: get alot of fog. I have to travel a bridge over Halifax harbour everyday
: to get to work. Sometimes the half the bridge is covered with fog and I
: wonder, as I get close to that part of the bridge, what waits on the
: other side. Will I come out of the fog in Halifax or some other place?
: Will the bridge end and I'll end up in he harbour?

Oh my God! LOL! Those are my thoughts exactly when we get some fog
here sometimes. I'm always looking for that gigantic fly-like creature
with the sucker mouth.

Sickleweed

: --
: Maura

: " Ring around the rosie
: Pocket full of posies
: Ashes, ashes, we all FALL DOWN " -- nursery rhyme

Dan Hetrick

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Jul 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/15/96
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Tony Hoffman wrote:
>
> Great idea! I don't know if I'd go to see it, though. I'd be scared to
> death. :-)
> (My three favorite stories from that collection were "The Mist", "The
> Monkey", and "The Jaunt".)
>
> --
> Tony Hoffman
> (to...@quicklink.com)
> "There are no wrong turnings, only paths
> we had not known we were meant to walk."
> --Guy Gavriel Kay, Tigana
Interesting notion, but I wonder if there's a way they could do it
without making the monsters look too hokey. The biggest hook in _The
Mist_ for me was the "unknown". King really never let you "see" the
monsters, except for the things at the window, but instead relied on the
reader's imagination instead to fill in the missing details. I don't
believe the T.V. or movie crowd would stand to pay $7.00+ to get half
shot glimpses of the monsters, and lots of people running around on the
screen in a mist that they're not supposed to be able to see through.
Could make for a dark, boring movie, although it was a wonderfully
frightening story. A perfect example of this paradigm is "Alien", since
when you finally did get to see the monster, it looked like a guy in a
"zipper suit".

Anybody else feel this way?

Dan Hetrick
dhet...@erols.com

Scott K. Stafford

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Jul 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/15/96
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: bb...@stbbs.com (Dark Penguin) wrote in article
<bbyun-15079...@news.stbbs.com>...

: I tend to agree, although you mentioned "Alien," which was indeed a movie
: where you basically got glimpses of the monster throughout most of the
: film -- and that was a big hit. For me, I think one big hook of "The
: Mist" is just this horrific/comedic juxtaposition of a nice, normal
: small-town supermarket surrounded by a bizarre extradimensional
: nightmare. The image of Mrs. Reppler going after some alien beast with
: cans of Raid never fails to crack me up. I think that is the kind of
: discordant, pop culture-meets-B-movie absurdism that could make for a
: funny but also terrifying black comedy. It's the kind of thing that could
: easily be unintentionally hilarious and unbelievable...but in the right
: hands I can see it being sort of a combo of "The Birds" and "Jurassic
: Park."

...except that no one in Hollyweird has the intestinal fortitude *not* to
give THE MIST a happy ending.

I can see it now... The supermarket crowd includes a couple' guys from the
Arrowhead Project--only they don't hang themselves--they team up with our
hero (played, perhaps, by Bruce Willis...) and in a
slam-bang-action-extravaganza not only do they rescue the hero's wife
(anyone for Tori Spelling...?), but they fight their way to the Arrowhead
Project site and (in a massive final trashing) they seal the deadly breach
in our universe. The last image from the film will be beautiful, golden
sunshine burning through the evaporating mist.

Hollywood will turn THE MIST from a gripping tale of uncertainty in a world
gone mad, into a typical action flick where the heroes beat the odds and
save the world.

Mark my words here. Mark them well.


--
sco...@together.net <Scott K. Stafford>
**************************************************
"Never ascribe malice to that which
can be adequately explained by stupidity."
**************************************************

Tony Hoffman

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Jul 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/15/96
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Margaret Lisa Whittington

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Jul 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/15/96
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I thought "The Mist" had already been made into a movie called "The Fog"
and it starred that chick from "True Lies" (I forget her name). Please
correct me if I'm wrong.
--
From Lisa & her pets:
"Charlie" the cockatiel, "Casper" the parakeet
"Monty" the python, "Edith" the iguana
"Elizabeth" the collared Lizard

web-server-account

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Jul 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/15/96
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Margaret Lisa Whittington (wild...@community.net) wrote:

: I thought "The Mist" had already been made into a movie called "The Fog"

: and it starred that chick from "True Lies" (I forget her name). Please
: correct me if I'm wrong.

Okay, you are wrong. "The Fog" was a John Carpenter movie starring
Adrianne Barbeau and Hal Holbrook. Totally different story.

Dark Penguin

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Jul 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/15/96
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>Interesting notion, but I wonder if there's a way they could do it
>without making the monsters look too hokey. The biggest hook in _The
>Mist_ for me was the "unknown". King really never let you "see" the
>monsters, except for the things at the window, but instead relied on the
>reader's imagination instead to fill in the missing details. I don't
>believe the T.V. or movie crowd would stand to pay $7.00+ to get half
>shot glimpses of the monsters, and lots of people running around on the
>screen in a mist that they're not supposed to be able to see through.
>Could make for a dark, boring movie, although it was a wonderfully
>frightening story. A perfect example of this paradigm is "Alien", since
>when you finally did get to see the monster, it looked like a guy in a
>"zipper suit".
>
>Anybody else feel this way?

I tend to agree, although you mentioned "Alien," which was indeed a movie


where you basically got glimpses of the monster throughout most of the
film -- and that was a big hit. For me, I think one big hook of "The
Mist" is just this horrific/comedic juxtaposition of a nice, normal
small-town supermarket surrounded by a bizarre extradimensional
nightmare. The image of Mrs. Reppler going after some alien beast with
cans of Raid never fails to crack me up. I think that is the kind of
discordant, pop culture-meets-B-movie absurdism that could make for a
funny but also terrifying black comedy. It's the kind of thing that could
easily be unintentionally hilarious and unbelievable...but in the right
hands I can see it being sort of a combo of "The Birds" and "Jurassic
Park."

Bryan Byun
bb...@stbbs.com
___________________________________________________
Life is one big minefield, and the only place that isn't a minefield is
where they make the mines. -- Michael O'Donoghue

Matthew Craig

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Jul 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/15/96
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In article <31EA78...@community.net>, Margaret Lisa Whittington
<wild...@community.net> writes

>Tony Hoffman wrote:
>>
>> Great idea! I don't know if I'd go to see it, though. I'd be scared to
>> death. :-)
>> (My three favorite stories from that collection were "The Mist", "The
>> Monkey", and "The Jaunt".)
>>
>> --
>> Tony Hoffman
>> (to...@quicklink.com)
>> "There are no wrong turnings, only paths
>> we had not known we were meant to walk."
>> --Guy Gavriel Kay, Tigana
>
>I thought "The Mist" had already been made into a movie called "The Fog"
>and it starred that chick from "True Lies" (I forget her name). Please
>correct me if I'm wrong.

This was, in fact, a movie adaptation of James Herbert's "The Fog".
Matthew Craig |"Do you love me,Westley? Is that it?"
Belfast |He couldn't believe it."Do I love you?
Phone:+44(0)1232 626126 |My God,if your love were a grain of
+44(0)1232 309561 |sand,mine would be a universe of
Fax:+44(0)1232 309561 |beaches.If your love were--"
E-mail:ma...@calamari.demon.co.uk |"I don't understand that first one
WWW:http://www.infm.ulst.ac.uk |yet,"Buttercup interrupted."Images just
/~acf4mcr |confuse me so--is this universal
-----------------------------------+business of yours bigger than my sand?"
William Goldman,"The Princess Bride"

Turnpike evaluation. For Turnpike information, mailto:in...@turnpike.com

Matthew Craig

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Jul 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/15/96
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In article <31EA1...@erols.com>, Dan Hetrick <dhet...@erols.com>

writes
>Tony Hoffman wrote:
>>
>> Great idea! I don't know if I'd go to see it, though. I'd be scared to
>> death. :-)
>> (My three favorite stories from that collection were "The Mist", "The
>> Monkey", and "The Jaunt".)
>>
>> --
>> Tony Hoffman
>> (to...@quicklink.com)
>> "There are no wrong turnings, only paths
>> we had not known we were meant to walk."
>> --Guy Gavriel Kay, Tigana
>Interesting notion, but I wonder if there's a way they could do it
>without making the monsters look too hokey. The biggest hook in _The
>Mist_ for me was the "unknown". King really never let you "see" the
>monsters, except for the things at the window, but instead relied on the
>reader's imagination instead to fill in the missing details. I don't
>believe the T.V. or movie crowd would stand to pay $7.00+ to get half
>shot glimpses of the monsters, and lots of people running around on the
>screen in a mist that they're not supposed to be able to see through.
>Could make for a dark, boring movie, although it was a wonderfully
>frightening story. A perfect example of this paradigm is "Alien", since
>when you finally did get to see the monster, it looked like a guy in a
>"zipper suit".
>
>Anybody else feel this way?
>
>Dan Hetrick
>dhet...@erols.com

I just have to add my piece here to say that I can't believe you thought
the "Alien" looked like a guy in a zipper-suit. Of all the alien films
ever made (and by that I don't mean the trilogy of films, I mean them
*all*), Giger's alien is one of the greatest and most-realistic looking
aliens ever. But then again, that's just my opinion :)

Matt (who is a *huge* fan of Giger)

J. Wermont

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Jul 15, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/15/96
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In article <31EA1...@erols.com> dhet...@erols.com writes:
> Interesting notion, but I wonder if there's a way they could do it
> without making the monsters look too hokey. The biggest hook in _The
> Mist_ for me was the "unknown". King really never let you "see" the
> monsters, except for the things at the window, but instead relied on the
> reader's imagination instead to fill in the missing details. I don't
> believe the T.V. or movie crowd would stand to pay $7.00+ to get half
> shot glimpses of the monsters, and lots of people running around on the
> screen in a mist that they're not supposed to be able to see through.
> Could make for a dark, boring movie, although it was a wonderfully
> frightening story.

I prefer movies that don't give you a good look at the monsters,
because I never find them as scary when I can see them clearly as I
do when they are merely hinted at, just barely glimpsed. It's easier
to do this in a book, but there's no reason a movie can't succeed
at it, also. I know I've mentioned this in this ng before, but I
thought the movie "Jacob's Ladder" did this hinting at creepiness
very well. You saw these weird images, of demon faces looking out
the back window of a car, or of a person with a strange growth coming
out of the back of her head, or of things changing into other things,
but you only saw it for a second, and then the image was gone. You'd
see it long enough to know it was something eerie, but not long enough
to really get used to it, to be able to say, "Oh, so that's all it is."
Left you wondering if you'd even seen it at all - it was *almost*
subliminal.

(Warning: Stand movie spoiler coming up)

In a way, I also thought The Stand miniseries did that with Flagg's
face, at least until about the 3rd episode. You saw his eyes suddenly
go completely black - no irises - and in that moment he looked
inhuman. Or there'd be a shot of him with his teeth looking all
crooked and animal-like. Or he'd be in the middle of talking, and
suddenly his voice would seem to be barking or growling, like a
beast. It was kind of subtle, and the image/sound would only be there
for a second, where you'd get just a hint that he wasn't really
human. In the 3rd (or was it the 4th?) episode, when his head turned
into the monster-head, I actually found that a lot less scary. To
me that just looked like a guy in a monster mask. It's not that I
ever thought he was really human, it was clear he had supernatural
powers right from the beginning. But he *looked* human, basically,
except when you'd see these sudden, brief glimpses into the monster
he was. And I found those glimpses much scarier than the demon-monster
head, when that was finally revealed.

Joyce
jwer...@netcom.com

Angelo Wentzler

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Jul 16, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/16/96
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w...@pcjfn.msc.com (web-server-account) writes:

>Margaret Lisa Whittington (wild...@community.net) wrote:

>: I thought "The Mist" had already been made into a movie called "The Fog"

>: and it starred that chick from "True Lies" (I forget her name). Please
>: correct me if I'm wrong.

>Okay, you are wrong. "The Fog" was a John Carpenter movie starring


>Adrianne Barbeau and Hal Holbrook. Totally different story.

She's even wronger. Jamie Lee Curtis is not a chick. (See how I subtly
inserted another movie fact here?)

Chuckie chuckie chuckieeeeee!

Angelo


web-server-account

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Jul 16, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/16/96
to

Scott K. Stafford (sco...@together.net) wrote:
: : bb...@stbbs.com (Dark Penguin) wrote in article


: ...except that no one in Hollyweird has the intestinal fortitude *not* to


: give THE MIST a happy ending.

: I can see it now... The supermarket crowd includes a couple' guys from the
: Arrowhead Project--only they don't hang themselves--they team up with our
: hero (played, perhaps, by Bruce Willis...) and in a
: slam-bang-action-extravaganza not only do they rescue the hero's wife
: (anyone for Tori Spelling...?), but they fight their way to the Arrowhead
: Project site and (in a massive final trashing) they seal the deadly breach
: in our universe. The last image from the film will be beautiful, golden
: sunshine burning through the evaporating mist.

: Hollywood will turn THE MIST from a gripping tale of uncertainty in a world
: gone mad, into a typical action flick where the heroes beat the odds and
: save the world.

No one, perhaps, except for Frank Darabont, who will be directing it.
When King first read his script for "The Shawshank Redemption" he
said that there was no way that this film would ever get made following
this script. The script was simply too good and someone would have to
get into it and tamper with it and Hollywood-ize it. Much to King's
delight and surprise, the movie turned out to be almost exactly the
same as the original screenplay suggested.

Murielle L. Sey

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Jul 16, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/16/96
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On Mon, 15 Jul 1996, Dan Hetrick wrote:

> Interesting notion, but I wonder if there's a way they could do it
> without making the monsters look too hokey. The biggest hook in _The
> Mist_ for me was the "unknown". King really never let you "see" the
> monsters, except for the things at the window, but instead relied on the
> reader's imagination instead to fill in the missing details. I don't
> believe the T.V. or movie crowd would stand to pay $7.00+ to get half
> shot glimpses of the monsters, and lots of people running around on the
> screen in a mist that they're not supposed to be able to see through.
> Could make for a dark, boring movie, although it was a wonderfully

> frightening story. A perfect example of this paradigm is "Alien", since
> when you finally did get to see the monster, it looked like a guy in a
> "zipper suit".
>
> Anybody else feel this way?
>
> Dan Hetrick


Hi Dan,

I for one think that it would be fantastic if they'd try to make a
horror picture without the big phoney monster payoff in the end. Suspense
is what horror is all about. I rememeber a TV episode, I think it was
from Night Gallery, about a guy who was afraid of spiders and washed one
down the drain. The spider kept coming back bigger and bigger... until
the end when it ate him. They stopped showing the spider after it reached
a certain size for obvious reasons, showing just shadows, but that has to
be the scariest show of that ilk I remember. I still wont wash any kind of
bug or somesuch down a drain.

Now if they made The Mist by just alluding to the monsterous
insects they'd have something really special. However, I don't think
anyone in "the business" has the courage to try something like that.
They're too used to giving us what they think we want.

Hugs
Murielle


Warren Acoose

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Jul 16, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/16/96
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Matthew Craig <ma...@calamari.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>In article <31EA78...@community.net>, Margaret Lisa Whittington
><wild...@community.net> writes
>>
>>I thought "The Mist" had already been made into a movie called "The >>Fog"
>>and it starred that chick from "True Lies" (I forget her name). Please
>>correct me if I'm wrong.
>
>This was, in fact, a movie adaptation of James Herbert's "The Fog".

Sorry, you're both wrong. The film, "The Fog," was not based on
Stephen King's "The Mist" nor James Herbert's "The Fog" but was an
original screenplay. I believe the screenplay was either written by John
Carpenter or based on an idea by John Carpenter. Jamie Lee Curtis did
star in the film.

--
Warren A.

"Read in order to live."
- Gustave Flaubert

Warren Acoose

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Jul 16, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/16/96
to

Matthew Craig <ma...@calamari.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>In article <31EA1...@erols.com>, Dan Hetrick <dhet...@erols.com>
>writes
>>A perfect example of this paradigm is "Alien", since
>>when you finally did get to see the monster, it looked like a guy in a
>>"zipper suit".
>
>I just have to add my piece here to say that I can't believe you thought
>the "Alien" looked like a guy in a zipper-suit. Of all the alien films
>ever made (and by that I don't mean the trilogy of films, I mean them
>*all*), Giger's alien is one of the greatest and most-realistic looking
>aliens ever. But then again, that's just my opinion :)

I agree with you, Matthew. I though Alien was one of the few films
where the "monster in the closet" lived up to the build-up.

Barbara Levy

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Jul 17, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/17/96
to

rcb...@urc.tue.nl (Angelo Wentzler) wrote:

>w...@pcjfn.msc.com (web-server-account) writes:

>>Margaret Lisa Whittington (wild...@community.net) wrote:

>>: I thought "The Mist" had already been made into a movie called "The Fog"

>>: and it starred that chick from "True Lies" (I forget her name). Please
>>: correct me if I'm wrong.

>>Okay, you are wrong. "The Fog" was a John Carpenter movie starring


>>Adrianne Barbeau and Hal Holbrook. Totally different story.

>She's even wronger. Jamie Lee Curtis is not a chick. (See how I subtly
>inserted another movie fact here?)

I don't get what you're saying. Jamie Lee Curtis is female.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Barbara Levy
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"There are things here in Derry that bite."
- Albert Carson


Ed McCreary

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Jul 17, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/17/96
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Barbara Levy wrote:
>
> rcb...@urc.tue.nl (Angelo Wentzler) wrote:
>
> >w...@pcjfn.msc.com (web-server-account) writes:
>
> >>Margaret Lisa Whittington (wild...@community.net) wrote:
>
> >>: I thought "The Mist" had already been made into a movie called "The Fog"
> >>: and it starred that chick from "True Lies" (I forget her name). Please
> >>: correct me if I'm wrong.
>
> >>Okay, you are wrong. "The Fog" was a John Carpenter movie starring
> >>Adrianne Barbeau and Hal Holbrook. Totally different story.
>
> >She's even wronger. Jamie Lee Curtis is not a chick. (See how I subtly
> >inserted another movie fact here?)
>
> I don't get what you're saying. Jamie Lee Curtis is female.

Check out the alt.folklore.urban FAQ. There's been a rumor going
around for quite a while that Curtis is either a hermaphrodite or
is genetically XY but with surpressed Y characteristics.

Both are true conditions, but there's no evidence that she suffers
from either one.

(I once saw a news magazine piece on women who were genetically XY.
Some were quite attractive so just because Curtis is a babe doesn't
mean it's not true. It also doesn't mean it *is* true.)

--
Ed McCreary #include <witty.txt>
mailto:fo...@neosoft.com
http://www.neosoft.com/~forge

Sickleweed

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Jul 17, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/17/96
to

Dan Hetrick (dhet...@erols.com) wrote:

: Interesting notion, but I wonder if there's a way they could do it
: without making the monsters look too hokey. The biggest hook in _The
: Mist_ for me was the "unknown". King really never let you "see" the
: monsters, except for the things at the window, but instead relied on the
: reader's imagination instead to fill in the missing details. I don't
: believe the T.V. or movie crowd would stand to pay $7.00+ to get half
: shot glimpses of the monsters, and lots of people running around on the
: screen in a mist that they're not supposed to be able to see through.
: Could make for a dark, boring movie, although it was a wonderfully

: frightening story. A perfect example of this paradigm is "Alien", since


: when you finally did get to see the monster, it looked like a guy in a
: "zipper suit".

: Anybody else feel this way?

Mmm, I'd have to say that I think they would be better off not showing
the monsters. I really believe that what the imagination conjures
up will always be much more scarier than what will be shown. And they
could still make the movie immensely creepy even without showing the
monsters. If they do a good job with creating a scary atmosphere and
if the actors provide solid performances which helps convey the feeling
of dread and terror, then the movie can be successful. A good example
would be the movie "The Haunting". That was a great TERROR flick because
they did such a good job creating a creepy and disturbing atmosphere.
The supernatural force was never shown explicitly and yet they succeeded
in scaring people.

I just hope they won't just settle for attaining the simple gross-out
factor and end up not only showing the monsters clearly, but also show
them eating the people as well. I think that would just ruin the movie.


: Dan Hetrick
: dhet...@erols.com

Barbara Levy

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Jul 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/18/96
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ma...@andy.pp.fi (Antti Matikka) wrote:

>barb...@ix.netcom.com (Barbara Levy) wrote:

>>rcb...@urc.tue.nl (Angelo Wentzler) wrote:
>>>She's even wronger. Jamie Lee Curtis is not a chick.

>>I don't get what you're saying. Jamie Lee Curtis is female.

>And very much so, but still.. She's not a chick <g>
>Maybe we Europeans have another slang.

I *still* don't get it. :-( The word "chick" is used here to mean
female (of course in a deragatory (sp?) way), usually referring to a
young attractive woman. What does chick mean to Europeans?

Freddy de Weerd

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Jul 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/18/96
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On Thu, 18 Jul 1996, Barbara Levy wrote:

>
> I *still* don't get it. :-( The word "chick" is used here to mean
> female (of course in a deragatory (sp?) way), usually referring to a
> young attractive woman. What does chick mean to Europeans?
>

It's not nearly as bad as it sounds over here. Chick here is actualy
rather positive. It refers to a nice, atractive (young) women, and is
mostly heard around young men from, say, their early puberty to at about
30 or so. But maybe Angelo can explain it so much better, so I dare him.

Truth or dare, Angelo (or should I say: Chuckie .........)

Freddy

---------------------------------------------------------
e-mail : fre...@theochem.kun.nl

Adress@work : Institute of Theoretical Chemistry
Toernooiveld
6525 ED NIJMEGEN
The Netherlands

Phone@work : +31-24-3653040

Fax@work : +31-24-3653041
---------------------------------------------------------

"To have and to hold"
M.L.Gore (Music for the Masses)


Antti Matikka

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Jul 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/18/96
to

barb...@ix.netcom.com (Barbara Levy) wrote:

>I *still* don't get it. :-( The word "chick" is used here to mean
>female (of course in a deragatory (sp?) way), usually referring to a
>young attractive woman. What does chick mean to Europeans?

Somewhat of a synonyme (or rather a pseudonyme) to 'bimbo'.
Any clearer? :-)

Andy

JG. Head

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Jul 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/18/96
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Matthew Craig (ma...@calamari.demon.co.uk) wrote:

: This was, in fact, a movie adaptation of James Herbert's "The Fog".

Actually, I don't think The Fog had anything to do with The Fog - if you
see what I mean.

Jared

--
Jared Head at the Department of Biochemistry, University of Bristol

"If anybody wants to clap," said Eeyore when he had read this,
"now is the time to do it."

Barbara Levy

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Jul 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/19/96
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ma...@andy.pp.fi (Antti Matikka) wrote:

>barb...@ix.netcom.com (Barbara Levy) wrote:

Ah ha! So it means about the same over here. Thanks Andy! :-)

meek

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Jul 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM7/25/96
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>Dan Hetrick (dhet...@erols.com) wrote:

The King man talks about this in Danse Macabre, If I'm right his logic is like
this.

If they show a ten foot cockroach, the audience will say, "Thats okay, but if
it was a hundred foot cock roach, I'd be scared."
They show a hundred foot cock roach and the audience says, "I'm okay with
that, but if it was 2 hundred feet . . I'd be scared." so on and so on.

Meek


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