July 2022 MBR Review The Native American Studies Shelf

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Aug 1, 2022, 2:14:50 PMAug 1
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The Native American Studies Shelf

American Indians at the Margins
H. Roy Kaplan
McFarland & Company
PO Box 611, Jefferson NC 28640
https://mcfarlandbooks.com
9781476684901, $49.95, PB, 358pp

https://www.amazon.com/American-Indians-Margins-Stereotypes-Impacts/dp/1476684901

Synopsis: Since the earliest days of America as a nation, racist imagery has been used to create harmful stereotypes of the indigenous people.

With the publication of "American Indians at the Margins: Racist Stereotypes and Their Impacts on Native Peoples" by H. Roy Kaplan, the conflict between invading European white settlers and the indigenous groups who occupied the land that became the United States is described through the context of race and racism.

Using depictions from art, literature, radio, cinema and television, the origin and persistence of such stereotypes are explained, and their debilitating effects on the well-being of Indians are presented. The text also explores their accomplishments in attempts to maintain their sovereignty, dignity and respect.

Critique: Informative enhanced for the reader with the inclusion of an informative Introduction (The Forgotten Minority: How Stereotypes Marginalized the Indians), a three page Epilogue, a twelve page Appendix (List of Federal and State Recognized Tribes), forty-two pages of Notes, a sixteen page Bibliography, and a seven page Index, "American Indians at the Margins: Racist Stereotypes and Their Impacts on Native Peoples" is a critically important contribution to college and university library Native American Demographic Studies collections and supplemental Native American History curriculum studies lists. It should be noted for the personal reading lists of students, academia, Native American Rights political activists, governmental policy makers, and non-specialist general readers with an interest in the subject that "American Indians at the Margins: Racist Stereotypes and Their Impacts on Native Peoples" is also available in a digital book format (Kindle, $29.99).

Editorial Note: H. Roy Kaplan, a former executive director of the Tampa Bay region of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, teaches courses on race and ethnic relations for the University of South Florida, Tampa. The author of six other books, he was named a Hero of Education by the U.S. Department of Education.

The Earth Is All That Lasts
Mark Lee Gardner
Mariner Books
www.marinerbooks.com
c/o HarperCollins Publishers
www.harpercollins.com
9780062669896, $28.99, HC, 560pp

https://www.amazon.com/Earth-All-That-Lasts-Sitting/dp/0062669893

Synopsis: Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull have become iconic Native Americans whose significance in 19th Century American western history undeniable. Together, these two Lakota chiefs, one a fabled warrior and the other a revered holy man, crushed George Armstrong Custer's vaunted Seventh Cavalry. Yet their legendary victory at the Little Big Horn has overshadowed the rest of their rich and complex lives. Now, based on years of research and drawing on a wealth of previously ignored primary sources, Western author and historian Mark Lee Gardner delivers the definitive chronicle, thrillingly told, of these extraordinary Indigenous leaders in "The Earth Is All That Lasts: Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, and the Last Stand of the Great Sioux Nation".

Both Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull were born and grew to manhood on the High Plains of the American West, in an era when vast herds of buffalo covered the earth, and when their nomadic people could move freely, following the buffalo and lording their fighting prowess over rival Indian nations. But as idyllic as this life seemed to be, neither man had known a time without whites. Fur traders and government explorers were the first to penetrate Sioux lands, but they were soon followed by a flood of white intruders: Oregon-California Trail travelers, gold seekers, railroad men, settlers, town builders - and Bluecoats. The buffalo population plummeted, disease spread by the white man decimated villages, and conflicts with the interlopers increased.

On June 25, 1876, in the valley of the Little Big Horn, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, and the warriors who were inspired to follow them, fought the last stand of the Sioux, a fierce and proud nation that had ruled the Great Plains for decades. It was their greatest victory, but it was also the beginning of the end for their treasured and sacred way of life. And in the years to come, both Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, defiant to the end, would meet violent (and eerily similar) fates.

An essential new addition to the canon of Indigenous American history and literature of the West, "The Earth Is All That Lasts: Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, and the Last Stand of the Great Sioux Nation" is a grand saga, both triumphant and tragic, of two fascinating and heroic leaders struggling to maintain the freedom of their people against impossible odds.

Critique: Informative enhanced for the reader with the inclusion of a two page Map, a four page listing of Native American Informants, ninety-six pages of Notes, a twenty-eight page listing bibliography of Resources, and a fourteen page Index, "The Earth Is All That Lasts: Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, and the Last Stand of the Great Sioux Nation" is an extraordinary work of exhaustive research and meticulous scholarship. Exceptionally well written, organized and presented, "The Earth Is All That Lasts: Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, and the Last Stand of the Great Sioux Nation" is a welcome and recommended addition to community, college, and university library Native American History & Biography collections. It should be noted for the personal reading lists of students, academia, and non-specialist general readers with an interest in the subject that "The Earth Is All That Lasts: Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, and the Last Stand of the Great Sioux Nation" is also available in a digital book format (Kindle, $14.99), as a complete and unabridged audio book (Blackstone Audio, 9798200972654, $41.99), and in a large print paperback edition (HarperLux, 9780063242098, $30.99).

Editorial Note: Mark Lee Gardner is also the author of "Rough Riders, To Hell on a Fast Horse" and "Shot All to Hell: Jesse James, the Northfield Raid, and the Wild West's Greatest Escape", which received multiple awards, including a Spur Award from Western Writers of America. An authority on the American West, Gardner has appeared on PBS's American Experience, as well as on the History Channel, AMC, the Travel Channel, and on NPR. He has written for National Geographic History, American Heritage, the Los Angeles Times, True West, and American Cowboy.

EDITOR'S NOTE:

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Midwest Book Review
278 Orchard Drive
Oregon, WI 53575-1129

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James A. Cox, Editor-in-Chief
Midwest Book Review
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