Are ALL bottled beers in US pasturized?

14 views
Skip to first unread message

Mark E. Bailey

unread,
Jul 11, 1991, 10:21:35 AM7/11/91
to
Okay. I am confused :-(.

Are all of the imported and domestic beers available bottled in the US
pasteurized? Is "dead" another term for pasteurized? What is
"cold-filtered"?

What preservatives are used in beers? Do most (all?) of the mass-market
beers use them?

Thanks to anyone who can reduce my confusion. Replies via e-mail OK.


--
Mark Bailey KD4D Motto: Life's too short to drink cheap beer.
me...@eng.umd.edu Disclaimer: I didn't really say this.

Karl recent Henning

unread,
Jul 12, 1991, 7:21:08 AM7/12/91
to
Oh, and after some kind soul has explained "cold-filtered" ("coal-
filtered"?), would someone in the know unravel the mysteries of
"fire-brewed" (re: Stroh's)?

kph

--
DEAR SIR AND FRIEND: You seem to be in prosperity. Could you lend an admirer
$1.50 to buy a hymn-book with? ... P.S. -- Don't send the hymn-book; send the
money; I want to make the selection myself. [letter from Twain to Carnegie]

Chris Boyd

unread,
Jul 12, 1991, 3:13:45 PM7/12/91
to
In article <83...@eerie.acsu.Buffalo.EDU> hen...@acsu.buffalo.edu (Karl recent Henning) writes:
>Oh, and after some kind soul has explained "cold-filtered" ("coal-
>filtered"?), would someone in the know unravel the mysteries of
>"fire-brewed" (re: Stroh's)?

Fire brewed, according to some Stroh's propaganda sheets that
they distributed when they first came to Texas, means that they
brew it in small (<5000 gallons ?!) copper mash kettles heated
directly by a gas or oil flame. Most brewers use steam, since it
is easier to control the temperature of the mash.
--
(*---------------------------------------------------------------------------*)
(* Chris Boyd OpenConnect Systems, Inc. c...@mips.mitek.com *)
(* All rights regarding my opinions reserved. *)
(* I have no right to speak for others, only for myself. *)

M14...@mwvm.mitre.org

unread,
Jul 12, 1991, 1:51:14 PM7/12/91
to
>From: hen...@acsu.buffalo.edu (Karl recent Henning)
>Date: 12 Jul 91 11:21:08 GMT

>Oh, and after some kind soul has explained "cold-filtered" ("coal-
>filtered"?), would someone in the know unravel the mysteries of
>"fire-brewed" (re: Stroh's)?

Well, I can't explain "fire-brewed", unless it simply means that they
use a fire to heat the brew, rather than an electric heating element
or somesuch. But "cold-filtered" is what most brewers do as far as I
know. It simple means that they run the fermented beer through a
small filter (2 micron, 5 micron??) that gets rid of the yeast and
also gets rid of any bacteria or the like as they are too big to fit
through the filter. That way you don't need to pasteurize it.

I have yet to go on a tour of a brewery and not see a filter being used
on the fermented beer before it is bottled. But then I haven't been on
a Bud, Miller, or Coors brewery tour.

Ed Faught

unread,
Jul 15, 1991, 1:59:47 PM7/15/91
to
In article <1991Jul11.1...@eng.umd.edu> me...@eng.umd.edu (Mark E.
Bailey) writes:
>Okay. I am confused :-(.
>
>Are all of the imported and domestic beers available bottled in the US
>pasteurized? Is "dead" another term for pasteurized? What is
>"cold-filtered"?
>
It was my understanding that cold filtering replaces pasteurization, but I
never figured out what "fire brewing" was.
--
Ed Faught

JEFF BRENDLE

unread,
Jul 15, 1991, 5:31:42 PM7/15/91
to
Pasteurized ==> "dead", yes.... A "real beer/ale" is not pasteurized, but is
sometimes filtered through diatomaceous (sp?) earth filters between aging and
bottling to clarify the beer. Yeast are still present and alive in these beers
which may or may not be apparent in the taste.

"Cold Filtered" I think ==> very very fine filtration of the product at temp's
near freezing (note this is applied to Lagered beers so this would again be at
the aging-->bottling/kegging stage).

"Genuine Draft" etc etc. ==> blatant lie...draft means that it is drawn from a
keg either by hand-pulling like the old British pubs do it or using CO2 (or w/
N2/CO2 mix for Guinness through a slow pour tap)...bottled beers *cannot be*
draft, except some marketing genius thought that since they were "tapped" from
a storage tank to the bottle this was "close enough"... =(

"Fire Brewed" ==> brewed with a real fire instead of electric heating elements?
Since all beer is made from a boiled wort of cereal grains, hops, and water I
guess this is just one way of saying that it was "cooked" the right way.

...just my thoughts.

Jeff B.
PennState

Brian V. Smith

unread,
Jul 15, 1991, 6:49:55 PM7/15/91
to
In article <83...@eerie.acsu.Buffalo.EDU>, hen...@acsu.buffalo.edu (Karl recent

Henning) writes:
|> Oh, and after some kind soul has explained "cold-filtered" ("coal-
|> filtered"?), would someone in the know unravel the mysteries of
|> "fire-brewed" (re: Stroh's)?
|>

Or "dry" beer? This has got to be the latest in hype. Everyone seems
to make a "dry" beer now.
What is it?

--
Brian V. Smith (bvs...@lbl.gov)
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory
I don't speak for LBL; they don't pay me enough for that.

Jim Scobbie

unread,
Jul 16, 1991, 8:58:19 PM7/16/91
to
I know nothing, but:

Sierra Nevada ale is bottle conditioned, ie it brews in the bottle, like
Thomas Hardy ale and champagne, and there's some bits of yeast and gunk
in the bottle (any advice on how to avoid drinking it?). I would guess
thgat this rules out pasteurisation.


--
-------
James M. Scobbie: Dept of Linguistics, Stanford University, CA 94305-2150

Ed Rush

unread,
Jul 16, 1991, 7:23:57 PM7/16/91
to
In article <1991Jul12.1...@linus.mitre.org> M14...@mwvm.mitre.org writes:
>... But "cold-filtered" is what most brewers do as far as I

>know. It simple means that they run the fermented beer through a
>small filter (2 micron, 5 micron??) that gets rid of the yeast and
>also gets rid of any bacteria or the like as they are too big to fit
>through the filter. That way you don't need to pasteurize it.
>
>I have yet to go on a tour of a brewery and not see a filter being used
>on the fermented beer before it is bottled. But then I haven't been on
>a Bud, Miller, or Coors brewery tour.

Last week, I toured the Granville Island Brewery in Vancouver,
B.C., and they use two filters in their cold-filtering process.
The tour guide said that most major breweries do NOT use
cold-filtering.
--
-----------------------------------------
Ed Rush, employed by but not speaking for
Metaphor Computers, Mtn. View, CA
UUCP: [...!{apple|decwrl}!]metaphor!mnementh!rush
Internet: ru...@mnementh.metaphor.com
-----------------------------------------
Calm down, everyone, it's only ones and zeroes.

fouc...@milton.u.washington.edu

unread,
Jul 17, 1991, 3:57:08 PM7/17/91
to
In article <1991Jul17.0...@Csli.Stanford.EDU> sco...@Csli.Stanford.EDU (Jim Scobbie) writes:
>I know nothing, but:
>
>Sierra Nevada ale is bottle conditioned, ie it brews in the bottle, like
>Thomas Hardy ale and champagne, and there's some bits of yeast and gunk
>in the bottle (any advice on how to avoid drinking it?). I would guess
>thgat this rules out pasteurisation.
>

You're right. The rules changed in several states in the past few years;
In 1989, Washington State permitted the sale of bottle-conditioned beers
(non-pasteurized) and voila! Chimay and the other 'mass produced'
Belgian ales began to appear again in markets. The Red Hook brewery
products (R(Red Hook ESB, Blackhook, Ballard Bitter and the seasonal
Winterhook) are not pasteurized-- check the expiration date on the
bottle before purchase! In California, Red Tail, Anderson Valley and
Lost Coast breweries don't pasteurize.

But don't count on a sea change. The big industrial brewers make their
money on bottled beer with a half life of 2 million years.

--
"To the next person moving to Seattle: Don't just say you're from LA.
Say you were born and raised in St. Louis or Wichita and you moved to
LA for fame and fortune. That having failed, you're now in Seattle."
-Tracy Abbott, _Time_ magazine.

Chris Boyd

unread,
Jul 17, 1991, 4:37:50 PM7/17/91
to
>I know nothing, but:
>Sierra Nevada ale is bottle conditioned, ie it brews in the bottle, like
>Thomas Hardy ale and champagne, and there's some bits of yeast and gunk
>in the bottle (any advice on how to avoid drinking it?). I would guess
>thgat this rules out pasteurisation.
>James M. Scobbie: Dept of Linguistics, Stanford University, CA 94305-2150

The stuff on the bottom of the bottle is yeast. It won't hurt
you to drink it. It just tastes funny to some people. In fact,
if you like you can even buy dried, killed brewer's yeast at
health food stores as a B-complex supplement.

To avoid the yeast, procure a CLEAN 14-18 oz. glass. Pour the
beer slowly down the side of the glass to prevent it from forming
too much foam. Once you start pouring, keep at it, going slowly
and not stopping. If you stop, there will be a slight backwash
that will disturb the yeast. With practice, you will be able to
pour all but the last 1/2 oz. or so from the bottle, without
getting any yeast.

Of course, these instructions assume a 12 oz. bottle. The user
must make appropriate ajustments for thier bottle size. Not
responsible for accidents.

Magnus Homann

unread,
Jul 18, 1991, 4:35:55 PM7/18/91
to
c...@hp835.mitek.com (Chris Boyd) writes:

>In article <1991Jul17.0...@Csli.Stanford.EDU> sco...@Csli.Stanford.EDU (Jim Scobbie) writes:
>>I know nothing, but:
>>Sierra Nevada ale is bottle conditioned, ie it brews in the bottle, like
>>Thomas Hardy ale and champagne, and there's some bits of yeast and gunk
>>in the bottle (any advice on how to avoid drinking it?). I would guess
>>thgat this rules out pasteurisation.
>>James M. Scobbie: Dept of Linguistics, Stanford University, CA 94305-2150

>The stuff on the bottom of the bottle is yeast. It won't hurt
>you to drink it. It just tastes funny to some people. In fact,
>if you like you can even buy dried, killed brewer's yeast at
>health food stores as a B-complex supplement.

>To avoid the yeast, procure a CLEAN 14-18 oz. glass. Pour the
>beer slowly down the side of the glass to prevent it from forming
>too much foam. Once you start pouring, keep at it, going slowly
>and not stopping. If you stop, there will be a slight backwash
>that will disturb the yeast. With practice, you will be able to
>pour all but the last 1/2 oz. or so from the bottle, without
>getting any yeast.

>Of course, these instructions assume a 12 oz. bottle. The user
>must make appropriate ajustments for thier bottle size. Not
>responsible for accidents.

Will that create enough foam?

To me it sounds as the beer will taste less with your technique.

Homann

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Magnus Homann E-mail: d0a...@dtek.chalmers.se
Computer Science and Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden

ra...@garnet.berkeley.edu

unread,
Jul 21, 1991, 8:13:41 PM7/21/91
to
In article <1991Jul18.2...@mathrt0.math.chalmers.se> d0a...@dtek.chalmers.se (Magnus Homann) writes:

>c...@hp835.mitek.com (Chris Boyd) writes:
>
>>The stuff on the bottom of the bottle is yeast. It won't hurt
>>you to drink it. It just tastes funny to some people. In fact,
>
>>To avoid the yeast, procure a CLEAN 14-18 oz. glass. Pour the
>>beer slowly down the side of the glass to prevent it from forming
>>too much foam. Once you start pouring, keep at it, going slowly
>>and not stopping. If you stop, there will be a slight backwash
>>that will disturb the yeast. With practice, you will be able to
>>pour all but the last 1/2 oz. or so from the bottle, without
>>getting any yeast.
>
>To me it sounds as the beer will taste less with your technique.
>
>Homann
>
In fact, there are beers, like the German "Hefe-Weisbier"*, in which the
residual yeast is an integral part of desired flavor. After several years of
enjoying home-brew and regionally brewed beers, like Sierras, I've come to
like it.

* "Hefe" is german for yeast. I'm not sure if "Weis" refers to the color,
white, or to the inclusion of wheat in the beer... (I'm not any kind of
beer expert, so no flames, please ... :>)

Tom Pollard ra...@lynx.berkeley.edu
University of California

David Hsu

unread,
Jul 22, 1991, 12:10:35 PM7/22/91
to
In article <1991Jul22....@agate.berkeley.edu> ra...@garnet.berkeley.edu writes:
>>c...@hp835.mitek.com (Chris Boyd) writes:
>>>The stuff on the bottom of the bottle is yeast. It won't hurt
>>>you to drink it. It just tastes funny to some people. In fact,
>>
>In fact, there are beers, like the German "Hefe-Weisbier"*, in which the
>residual yeast is an integral part of desired flavor.

And more. Hefe-weiss has vastly more body than weiss-kristall (filtered).
Alas, even with the Brickskeller nearby, it's impossible to get ahold of
any Weihenstephan...

Prosit!

-dave

--
David Hsu h...@eng.umd.edu "There you stand like a duck in a
U of Md Systems Research Ctr thunderstorm again - aren't you ever
College Park, Md 20742-3311 going to understand?"
+1 301 405 3689 - W. A. Mozart

Dave Brown

unread,
Jul 22, 1991, 2:53:04 PM7/22/91
to
In article <1991Jul17.0...@Csli.Stanford.EDU>, sco...@Csli.Stanford.EDU (Jim Scobbie) writes:
|> I know nothing, but:
|>
|> Sierra Nevada ale is bottle conditioned, ie it brews in the bottle, like
|> Thomas Hardy ale and champagne, and there's some bits of yeast and gunk
|> in the bottle (any advice on how to avoid drinking it?). I would guess
|> thgat this rules out pasteurisation.
|>

SN yeast is clings to the bottom very well,Home Brewers prefer this yeast of this
reason, and the excellent taste. Even if you pour hard it will usually stay. But
I guess I ought to start a subject on decanting beer.


1. open beer (this is a great start huh?)
2. hold appropriate glass at about 30-45 degree angle from vertical.
3. gently pour beer on to side of glass, avoiding relasing too much CO2
4. If the yeast is heavy and loose, leave the last 1 - 1/2 inch in the bottle
(you probably don't have to worry about this last step for SN)

My advise, RDWHAHB, translated Relax, Don't Worry Have a Home Brew, but hey good bottled beer wil work for you who have yet to be converted.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
David S. Brown |
br...@ocelot.llnl.gov |
.__ / .__ |
| \ \ |__) | Livermore CA 94550 ME(415) 423-9878
|__/ / |__) | ci...@cheetah.llnl.gov FAX(415) 423-8002
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dave Lockwood

unread,
Jul 22, 1991, 8:33:35 AM7/22/91
to
From what I hear/read, bottled Guinness is a "live" beer. There are a few
other beers that are "bottle conditioned", and some will continue to improve
with age for up to a year or more. You'll usually find a yeast sediment in
the bottom of such beers.
--
"I look at him, and you know what I see? | da...@msb.com (Dave Lockwood)
Dolls with suction cups on their feet | UUCP: ...!uupsi!mpoint!dave
staring out of car windows." | Sysop of Meetpoint Station BBS
- Daniel Clamp (Gremlins II) | cat flames | mail sa...@north.pole

Christian Forst

unread,
Jul 24, 1991, 5:07:24 AM7/24/91
to
>In article <1991Jul18.2...@mathrt0.math.chalmers.se> d0a...@dtek.chalmers.se (Magnus Homann) writes:
>>c...@hp835.mitek.com (Chris Boyd) writes:
>>
[stuff about yeast in beer deleted]

>>
>In fact, there are beers, like the German "Hefe-Weisbier"*, in which the
>residual yeast is an integral part of desired flavor. After several years of
>enjoying home-brew and regionally brewed beers, like Sierras, I've come to
>like it.
>
>* "Hefe" is german for yeast. I'm not sure if "Weis" refers to the color,
> white, or to the inclusion of wheat in the beer... (I'm not any kind of
> beer expert, so no flames, please ... :>)
>
>Tom Pollard ra...@lynx.berkeley.edu
>University of California
"Weiss" in the word "Weissbier" refers to the wheat used in this sort of beers.
So you also can get dark "Weissbier". At least there are at least four types
of "Weissbier": All combination of light - dark and with - without yeast.

Christian

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages