Old Archery sayings

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Ken Ness

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Jun 8, 2002, 6:53:46 PM6/8/02
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I am trying to compile a list of sayings and expressions that are in common
use today but have their roots in archery. This is for use as part of a
display for a public Have-a-go our club is holding. Any (preferably) clean
offerings would be appreciated.

Thanks

Ken Ness


gwynn

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Jun 8, 2002, 8:40:48 PM6/8/02
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geeb...@NOSPAMntlworld.com
"Ken Ness" <Kn...@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
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I'll start with.......
Playing fast and loose
Another string to your bow
A bolt from the blue


hippy

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Jun 8, 2002, 8:58:53 PM6/8/02
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Maybe not so clean (it's all in the delivery), but the obvious one to me would be
the two-fingered salute.
I think it originated when because the french used to cut off the drawing fingers
of english archers. In battle, english archers would then give them the two fingers
salute to show them they had not been caught.

hip


"gwynn" <geeb...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message news:%sxM8.6021$tm.9...@news6-win.server.ntlworld.com...

John Howland

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Jun 8, 2002, 10:30:49 PM6/8/02
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Archers get to step over the line...

Some need Training wheels <G>...

--

-----
John Howland
-----

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Peter S. Saly

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Jun 8, 2002, 11:25:56 PM6/8/02
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"gwynn" <geeb...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
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>
>

A bolt from the blue would be more a "crossbow" term..
Not archery according to some purits..
:-)

Tom Duncan

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Jun 9, 2002, 2:49:35 AM6/9/02
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Keep it under your hat - as in, to keep a spare string under your had so
that it would stay dry. Mainly a medieval problem before the advent of
waxed fastflight.

Tom
--
These Five Words In My Head
Scream "Are We Having Fun Yet?"

the...@webtv.net

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Jun 9, 2002, 9:04:55 AM6/9/02
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How about "straight arrow", and the reverse, "arrow straight".


Jim McPhail

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Jun 9, 2002, 1:37:57 PM6/9/02
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"Ken Ness" <Kn...@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
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Not a saying, but I've been wondering recently if the "thumbs up" sign has
its roots in archery.

After all, a "fistmele" (bracing height distance for a longbow) is very
similar. I was wondering if perhaps giving the "thumbs up" was originally a
signal that you were ready to shoot?

-Mac


Jim McPhail

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Jun 9, 2002, 1:40:49 PM6/9/02
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Sorry for the double post........

Also, I recently found out that bluebell flowers were not originally native
to Britain, but were in fact introduced (from the Americas, I think) because
the roots can be ground up to make a glue which was used for sticking
arrowheads to arrows (for longbows) back in medieval times.

-Mac


Peter S. Saly

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Jun 9, 2002, 2:30:28 PM6/9/02
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"Jim McPhail" <m...@jmcphail.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
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Uh !
Back in medieval times, there was no documented trade between England and
the Americas...
Do you know something that the rest of the world does not ?


Jim McPhail

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Jun 10, 2002, 12:25:46 PM6/10/02
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"Peter S. Saly" <Pe...@Saly.com> wrote in message
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<snip>

> Uh !
> Back in medieval times, there was no documented trade between England and
> the Americas...
> Do you know something that the rest of the world does not ?


Yes......

Your mum.

-Mac


Peter S. Saly

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Jun 10, 2002, 12:38:52 PM6/10/02
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"Jim McPhail" <m...@jmcphail.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:ae2jsi$clo$1...@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...

>
> "Peter S. Saly" <Pe...@Saly.com> wrote in message
> news:ug77o03...@corp.supernews.com...

> >> <snip replaced


> >> "Jim McPhail" <m...@jmcphail.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:ae03t6$j6b$1...@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...
> >> Sorry for the double post........
> >>
> >> Also, I recently found out that bluebell flowers were not originally
native
> >> to Britain, but were in fact introduced (from the Americas, I think)
because
> >> the roots can be ground up to make a glue which was used for sticking
> >> arrowheads to arrows (for longbows) back in medieval times.
> >>
> >> -Mac
> >>
> >>
> >

> > Uh !
> > Back in medieval times, there was no documented trade between England
and
> > the Americas...
> > Do you know something that the rest of the world does not ?
>
>
> Yes......
>
> Your mum.
>
> -Mac
>
>

Interesting that a cheap insult is the only way you have to cover your
mistake..
Tells a lot about you
As to my mother
She doesn't know wanking knob-suckers like you..
But fantasize on..
I'ts the only way dog's vomit like you will ever get anywhere near
quality..


gwynn

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Jun 10, 2002, 3:20:14 PM6/10/02
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"hippy" <REMOVE_...@bigpond.com> wrote in message
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> Maybe not so clean (it's all in the delivery), but the obvious one to me
would be
> the two-fingered salute.
> I think it originated when because the french used to cut off the drawing
fingers
> of english archers. In battle, english archers would then give them the
two fingers
> salute to show them they had not been caught.
> hip

So the story goes, and I like to believe it but then we were having a natter
over that, as you do, and decided it wouldn't do much good as you would be
able to shoot (eventually) other handed. It would make more sense to take
the thumb as well, then you would be well buggered. Of course it makes even
more sense to kill the archer straight off rather than mess about removing
digits ! But then I wouldn't put anything past the French.......


gwynn

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Jun 10, 2002, 3:10:08 PM6/10/02
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"gwynn" <geeb...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
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>
>

And of course I forgot "going for gold"


Jim McPhail

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Jun 10, 2002, 4:48:50 PM6/10/02
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"Peter S. Saly" <Pe...@Saly.com> wrote in message
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<snip lamer rant>

PLONK.


Peter S. Saly

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Jun 10, 2002, 4:59:16 PM6/10/02
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"Jim McPhail" <m...@jmcphail.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
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>


"Peter S. Saly" <Pe...@Saly.com> wrote in message
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>

> "Jim McPhail" <m...@jmcphail.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:ae2jsi$clo$1...@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...
> >

> > "Peter S. Saly" <Pe...@Saly.com> wrote in message

> PLONK.
>
>


LOL..
Another one who likes to insult but can't take it..

John Grove

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Jun 10, 2002, 6:06:10 PM6/10/02
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Geoffrey Chaucer's son was at Agincourt and records the boiling up of
Bluebell roots to repair arrows the night before the battle. Agincourt
in 1415 was a long time before Columbus sailed the ocean blue in 1492

However you are right in that Bluebells are not a native species but
were introduced for arrow making glue.

How about "fast and loose" for a saying?

--
John Grove

Richard

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Jun 11, 2002, 10:54:21 AM6/11/02
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Ken Ness <Kn...@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
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There's also the not so clean (nowadays) "cock-up" which I am led to believe
refers to the wayward shot resulting from getting the cock feather the wrong
way up?

Cheers

Richard


Tom Duncan

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Jun 11, 2002, 3:53:51 PM6/11/02
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I'm going to be picky now ;-)

If it was cock feather up (or even down) then it must have been a
compound related phrase, and so not so old? Getting confused between
left and right would make it a finger release thing, and so closer to
traditional style of archery. Of course, if you have really thin carbons
from a compound, there's not much choice but cock feather up. (Or is
there? I haven't really been paying attention to new developments in
compound, besides the advent of the 27" ATA bow - these things are
getting ludicrously short.)

End ramble.

Ken Ness

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Jun 11, 2002, 4:56:48 PM6/11/02
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Children - I wish I hadn't asked the question. :-)

"Peter S. Saly" <Pe...@Saly.com> wrote in message

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Mike Anthony

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Jun 11, 2002, 5:34:46 PM6/11/02
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How about the command given to medieval armies to prepare their bows for
action? "Brace yourselves"

Also - and I'm really not sure about this one - a "thumbs up" sign coming
from the habit of checking a longbows bracing height with a fistmele. If
the string touches your thumb tip, its OK. And before anyone says anything,
no, it doesn't come from ancient Rome and the gladiatorial games, i.e.
"thumbs up" for life and "thumbs down" for death, that's a later Hollywood
invention.

Cheers

Mike

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Chris Carroll

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Jun 11, 2002, 6:25:53 PM6/11/02
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Doesn't seem likely. Cock comes from the old English "coc" which just means
a lump or heap and came to mean pretty much anything sticking up i.e. cocked
up as in a hay cock or a cock's comb. There are even two hills in Cumbria
called "Little Cockup" and "Great Cockup" (which is over 1,700 feet high) -
I doubt if any of it comes from archery.

Chris


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Ken Ness

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Jun 11, 2002, 6:42:17 PM6/11/02
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I suppose if you tend to lay the long bow horizontal to the group whilst
nocking the arrow then the "cock" feather would/would not be up - and before
you ask with 10,000 'orrible screaming Frenchmen descending on you would you
stop to look?

Ken Ness


"Tom Duncan" <tpd...@york.ac.uk> wrote in message
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Tom Duncan

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Jun 11, 2002, 7:48:11 PM6/11/02
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Ken Ness wrote:
>
> I suppose if you tend to lay the long bow horizontal to the group whilst
> nocking the arrow then the "cock" feather would/would not be up - and before
> you ask with 10,000 'orrible screaming Frenchmen descending on you would you
> stop to look?
>
> Ken Ness
>

Very valid point. Although, if being attacked by "10,000 'orrible
screaming Frenchmen" I wouldn't be shooting at all. I'd be running :-)

Peter S. Saly

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Jun 11, 2002, 10:15:17 PM6/11/02
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Well I don't see why my question about his questionnable time frame deserved
his response..


"Ken Ness" <Kn...@btopenworld.com> wrote in message

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shadyshark

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Jun 12, 2002, 8:00:26 AM6/12/02
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Yes, the Roman gesture was a horizontal thumb (I seem to recall
reading somewhere - Desmond Morris?).

"Drawing a longbow" was once a term for spinning a story or tall tale,
I'm told. But not in use anymore.

One still in use: "having another string to your bow" - meaning having
a fall back position, back up plan or another skill.

I've also seen a reference which suggests that the word "sinner" is
derived from a Hebrew archery term (meaning "missing the mark" or
something similar).

"Mike Anthony" <mike.a...@dimspam.btinternet.com> wrote in message news:<ae5qdm$hbd$1...@helle.btinternet.com>...

Don Casteel

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Jun 12, 2002, 10:20:23 PM6/12/02
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There is always the saying "He has a lot of clout." Referring to the number
of archers available for shooting. This comes from practicing on the clout
( a shirt or other cloth outside of the church on Sunday.)

"Richard" <hhgg...@mweb.co.za> wrote in message
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>

Michael Ney

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Jun 16, 2002, 10:40:43 AM6/16/02
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"The upshot" the last arrow in a competition, often the one that decides the
winner.

"Near the mark" "Miss the mark" are both fairly obvious.

"Too close to call" where the nearer arrow to the mark cannot be
distinguished.

"To have a quiver-full" to have many children. (When Nathan Meyer Rothschild
sent his five sons out to found branches of the banking house all over
Europe they adopted the badge of the five arrows and their London HQ is
"Five Arrows House")

Hope those are useful

Michael Ney

Zolan

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Jun 16, 2002, 3:05:58 PM6/16/02
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Although it sounds like it ought to....I heard an antiques specialist
declare that "cock-up" came from a "chair bodgers" failure to make a wooden
chair which has all four feet flat on the floor, it is cocked (lifted at an
angle) up. And also not made quite right.
Z
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Daz

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Jun 16, 2002, 3:32:48 PM6/16/02
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The only saying I know of that hasn't already been mentioned is "Boss Eyed"
used to describe someone who actually misses the target boss.

Daz

Paracelsus

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Jul 4, 2002, 1:10:12 PM7/4/02
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Problem is archery is so old that most of the "old sayings" tend to be in
languages other than English.

Now I'm sure that in the pre indo-european languages there were some
rare and eloquent chestnuts.

davemc...@gmail.com

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Jun 19, 2020, 5:20:45 AM6/19/20
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On Saturday, 8 June 2002 23:53:46 UTC+1, Ken Ness wrote:
> I am trying to compile a list of sayings and expressions that are in common
> use today but have their roots in archery. This is for use as part of a
> display for a public Have-a-go our club is holding. Any (preferably) clean
> offerings would be appreciated.
>
> Thanks
>
> Ken Ness

I always understood that the saying was 'rule of thumb' and not 'thumbs up' indicating measuring the required height for the bow string.
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