College Algebra Vs. Algebra II

5562 views
Skip to first unread message

Elliot Villiger

unread,
Mar 3, 2001, 5:19:22 PM3/3/01
to
Is College Algebra and Algebra II the same thing or are they different? If
they are different, what is the difference?

All I am really looking for is diffculty level and areas or topics covered
in College Algebra.

thanks.

elliot


Stan Brown

unread,
Mar 4, 2001, 8:39:38 AM3/4/01
to
Quoth Elliot Villiger <ev...@home.com> in alt.algebra.help:

Of course you understand that the answer will be different among
different textbooks and different schools. If you have a specific
school in mind, you really need to ask there.

With that caveat, here's _one_ answer. College Algebra, despite its
name, is very often a high-school course. It may cover topics beyond
second-year algebra. Some examples:

- partial fractions

- matrices and determinants

- theory of equations

Sometimes there is some overlap between the content of courses
called "college algebra" and those called "precalculus".

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cortland County, New York, USA
http://oakroadsystems.com
alt.algebra.help FAQ: http://oakroadsystems.com/aah/
FAQs and math resources: http://oakroadsystems.com/math/resource.htm
more FAQs: http://oakroadsystems.com/tech/faqget.htm

Judy

unread,
Mar 4, 2001, 10:10:17 AM3/4/01
to
Having taught both, I'd say College Algebra is a little shy in the content
of Alg II. Remember, Alg II is taught over a 180 school days while the
college course is presented over approximately 30 classes. In the high
school program there is more time for practice; not so in the college
course.
Judy

"Elliot Villiger" <ev...@home.com> wrote in message
news:K5eo6.46836$t67.6...@news1.rdc1.il.home.com...

Bob

unread,
Mar 4, 2001, 1:02:18 PM3/4/01
to
On Sat, 03 Mar 2001 22:19:22 GMT, "Elliot Villiger" <ev...@home.com>
wrote:

>Is College Algebra and Algebra II the same thing or are they different? If
>they are different, what is the difference?
>

The big difference is the pace. The college course proceeds at a
_much_ more rapid pace. Those who would struggle with the course at HS
level will find the college pace impossible.

The content will vary depending on the specific schools. But HS
students sometimes do take the college courses for HS credit. Check
with the specific school, or even specific instructor, for details.

bob

Stan Brown

unread,
Mar 4, 2001, 4:01:46 PM3/4/01
to
Quoth Bob <bbr...@uclink4.berkeley.edu> in alt.algebra.help:

>The big difference is the pace. The college course proceeds at a
>_much_ more rapid pace. Those who would struggle with the course at HS
>level will find the college pace impossible.

You and Judy both seem to imply that College Algebra is a course
taught in college.

For what it's worth, in my experience the course is taught in high
school. Quite by coincidence, the question came up at the community
college where I tutor, and the lead tutor said that"college algebra"
was a misnomer because it is a high-school course.

I'm not saying you and Judy are wrong, just that the term means
different things depending on whom you ask.

John

unread,
Mar 4, 2001, 5:25:05 PM3/4/01
to
Stan Brown wrote:
>
> Quoth Bob <bbr...@uclink4.berkeley.edu> in alt.algebra.help:
> >The big difference is the pace. The college course proceeds at a
> >_much_ more rapid pace. Those who would struggle with the course at HS
> >level will find the college pace impossible.
>
> You and Judy both seem to imply that College Algebra is a course
> taught in college.
>
> For what it's worth, in my experience the course is taught in high
> school. Quite by coincidence, the question came up at the community
> college where I tutor, and the lead tutor said that"college algebra"
> was a misnomer because it is a high-school course.
>
> I'm not saying you and Judy are wrong, just that the term means
> different things depending on whom you ask.

Odd... many of the problems in my college algebra text are nearly the
same to those in first year calc---in fact, I use a pre-calc and calc
book as references! My groups class presentation will be on the 'box
construction' problem; a historical and theoretical perspective.

Now... I'd really be interested in comparing college algebra of my
father's generation (mid '70's) to mine; no comparison to what I'm
learning---I'm definitely ahead of the college algebra of his time.

Doug Magnoli

unread,
Mar 5, 2001, 1:41:57 AM3/5/01
to
I'm not so sure about your being so far ahead of the college algebra of the
mid '70s. I was an undergrad in the mid '70s, and my school didn't have a
'college algebra' course--it was assumed that the students had learned
algebra in high school. The lowest level class offered by the math
department was diferential calculus.

To me what this means is that in your father's era, 'college algebra' wasn't
even offered because everyone already knew it. If you have to take it in
college, you're way _behind_ the 'college algebra' of that era.

I'm always astounded when I hear of 'college algebra.' To me, this implies
the sort of math class for a grad student or an upper division math major
undergrad--abstract algebra--rings, groups, Galois theory, etc.. To call
the factoring of x^3 - 3x + 2 (or the box construction problem) 'college
algebra' is almost embarrassing.

-Doug Magnoli

palef...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 27, 2015, 12:11:26 AM9/27/15
to
Sorry Doug, but I have seen College Algebra texts as old as late 19th century. Just because your dad didn't have it in his school nor take it doesn't mean it wasn't there. The 70's either as I have seen College Algebra textbooks during that era too.

br ni

unread,
Apr 14, 2022, 6:48:34 AM4/14/22
to
On Sunday, September 27, 2015 at 6:11:26 AM UTC+2, palef...@gmail.com wrote:

> Sorry Doug, but I have seen College Algebra texts as old as late 19th century. Just because your dad didn't have it in his school nor take it doesn't mean it wasn't there. The 70's either as I have seen College Algebra textbooks during that era too.

bro that was like 14 years ago

Doug19752533

unread,
May 27, 2022, 4:04:52 PM5/27/22
to
Algebra 2 (or Intermediate Algebra) builds on the topics of Algebra 1 (Beginning/Elementary Algebra). You will go deeper into detail about rational equations and expressions, linear equations, radicals, radical expressions and equations, and introduce new concepts such as functions, domains and range, quadratics, complex and imaginary numbers. some teaching methods also introduce matrices/systems. College Algebra further expands on these ideas.
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages