Laikoi Dromoi with MOVING NOTES!

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ShriBadatOfficial

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Apr 30, 2020, 7:12:05 AM4/30/20
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Γεια σας, ρε μαγκες!

My friend give me baglama saz for a while, but I more interested in Rebetika than in Turku. I tried to use Italiko dromoi (Re La Re) for it,but now I use standart buzuk duzen. I found some lessons for folk guitar by Apostolos Apostolidhis. There he explained Dromoi with moving notes. However, he only explained Nihavend (with no moving notes), Nikriz, Ousak and Sabah. Also I learned Kartziyar by myself (fifth and sixth notes are moving, am I corerct?), because I know songs Ti se melei esenane and Aeroplano tha paro very well. But there are many dromoi like Kiurdi, Segah, ect., which are known by me only as scales. Also there are rules of progression in each dromos. For example, when you are moving up in Ousak, you can't play 4 semi-tones from the first note in the row, but when you moving down you can (it is frequent return to the tonic) and you often return to the tonic through low position of second note (just as in the Phrygian scale)
Is anyone obtained the full information about Dromoi? 

Best regards, Artemios from Russia

ShriBadatOfficial

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Apr 30, 2020, 7:22:21 AM4/30/20
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Italiko douzeni, I mean
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Νίκος Πολίτης

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May 1, 2020, 5:18:50 AM5/1/20
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 Hello, Artemios!

 

I don’t know how big and how accurate your saz is regarding note intervals, but you don’t have to worry much.  Here in Greece, the vast majority of Rebetiko fans plays the bouzouki, accompanied by guitar and the small “Greek” baglamas as typical orchestra.  All these instruments are fretted, so no movable perdeler come up. When tunes are played, that were originally recorded obeying the “classical” intervals like e.g. Aeroplano tha  paro, we simply disregard the individual interval differences. 

 

Although Greek “Dromoi” actually derive from the respective oriental makamlar, the  western tones / semitones are used.  It is advisable to follow a modal approach rather, than a scale oriented one.  I don’t know of Apostolidis’ book but I would strongly advise the “Laiki kithara” (folk guitar) book of Dimitris Mystakidis.  You can either buy the book or download it for free, e.g. from this link:  https://www.openbook.gr/i-laiki-kithara/

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Νίκος Πολίτης

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May 1, 2020, 6:03:38 AM5/1/20
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And something more:  You probably have not heard of (the late) Marios Mavroidis.  He has written a very good book, today a classical standard, presenting and comparing the modal approach of music in the Eastern Mediterranean, i.e. the byzantine Echos, the arabian makam and the Turkish makam.  Somewhere in the introduction, where he observes different definitions of intervals in those three approaches, he  makes the following note, to which I fully agree:  Regardless of the “official definition”, which is no more than perhaps one or two centuries old anyway, all traditional interpreters would always prefer to stick to their personal approach rather, than strictly complying to what Rauf Yehta Bey or Simon Karas of Greece or whoever theorist has thought of, often following national or other non – musical rules in the early 20th century.  So, feel free to develop you own style with your saz!


On Thursday, April 30, 2020 at 2:12:05 PM UTC+3, ShriBadatOfficial wrote:

ShriBadatOfficial

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May 2, 2020, 5:28:52 AM5/2/20
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Thank you very much, Nikos! I fond of Mystakidhis as folk guitarist, he covered many Rebetiko song in Kostas Beksos', Dmitriadhis' and Dousas' manner. Laiki kithara is known lesser than bouzouki. 
When I said about moving notes I didn't mean moving frets. I talk about change in scales, when some steps can be played either higher or lower by semitone. It is like Melodic Major and Minor, but it not depends moving on up-scale and down-scale 
This is lesson by Apostolidhis. He exlains "Ematha pos ise mangas" (Peristeris' version) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cU4O54Nd41A&t=383s

пятница, 1 мая 2020 г., 13:03:38 UTC+3 пользователь Νίκος Πολίτης написал:

Νίκος Πολίτης

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May 2, 2020, 12:04:51 PM5/2/20
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Well, it’s somewhat difficult to try to communicate via keyboard… My main point is that at least in the beginning (from 1932 on), although played by well tempered instruments, rebetiko kept its modal characteristics.

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