Using digital cameras and scanners with Moleskines

17 views
Skip to first unread message

Daniel Choi

unread,
Oct 8, 2008, 10:48:23 AM10/8/08
to Moleskinerie
Does anyone use a digital camera or a scanner to digitize their
Moleskine notes, mind maps, diagrams, or drawings on a regular basis?
I'd like to hear about how well this works for people, how you go
about organizing the images, and you do anything else cool with them.

Tob...@aol.com

unread,
Oct 8, 2008, 6:00:44 PM10/8/08
to Molesk...@googlegroups.com
     I also use a composition notebook ( those black & white that they used in school for tests.) for my concept maps. I haven't scanned them in, but I have scanned in my moleskine pages, as I draw, & need to scan it in to send to my art group. I just resize mine starting at 600 pixels & work my way down to a much smaller size that I feel will fit in an email. I am not an expert by any means. You can also use a digital camera, if you don't have a scanner.
 
     Toby
 




New MapQuest Local shows what's happening at your destination. Dining, Movies, Events, News & more. Try it out!

Erisraven

unread,
Oct 11, 2008, 7:58:32 PM10/11/08
to Moleskinerie
I scan the pages of my moleskines that I'm not carrying as I archive
them. That way, I can carry a zip file of my pages with me, and
reference them wherever without carrying all the old ones. It didn't
take that long, and it's proved invaluable to me. I sort them by type
of page (diary entry, game notes, book ideas, reference, etc).
Hope this helps!
-erisraven

Daniel Choi

unread,
Oct 11, 2008, 10:17:59 PM10/11/08
to Molesk...@googlegroups.com
Do you use a Apple Macintosh or Windows or Linux? Do you use any
program, like iPhoto, to keep the scans organized? I really like the
idea of scanning my Moleskine. I love looking at my handwritten pages.
A lot more than I enjoy looking at computer fonts.

Tob...@aol.com

unread,
Oct 11, 2008, 11:26:45 PM10/11/08
to Molesk...@googlegroups.com
     Windows. Handwriting - I agree. Check out this book, Everyday Matters by Danny Gregory. You can google his name to find his site. I'm not sure how he is able to use handwriting, but you could always ask him. I use the easiest program that AOL, I assume, came with to correct the size of my drawings, but I have them organized in My Pictures, that also came with, I'm assuming AOL. There are a lot of free sites that people use to share their pictures, like Flicker & others. You can use Blogger. May I ask, why do you want to scan in your pages to look at them online? Was there a specific reason for doing this?
 
     Toby
Do you use a Apple Macintosh or Windows or Linux? Do you use any
program, like iPhoto, to keep the scans organized? I really like the
idea of scanning my Moleskine. I love looking at my handwritten pages.
A lot more than I enjoy looking at computer fonts.

Daniel Choi

unread,
Oct 11, 2008, 11:50:54 PM10/11/08
to Molesk...@googlegroups.com
I use Apple and Linux. Thanks for the book recommendation. I'm
ordering that book. It looks like a great source of inspiration.

I'm thinking of scanning mainly to organize all the notes I have
scattered across different notebooks. My notes are all intermingled,
so I have notes on different subjects following each other just
because that's the order in which I happened to write them. I don't
want to cut up my moleskines to organize my notes by subject. So I
thought scanning them might be a good way to arrange things by topic.

Smitty

unread,
Oct 12, 2008, 4:02:03 PM10/12/08
to Moleskinerie
Rather than scan mine, I re-write notes from the pocket cahiers I take
into meetings into a fuller report of the meeting. I write that in an
Apica CD-15 that I use for my work log. I carry the Apica in a leather
slip cover, so I can change out the pages as they get filled. While I
still have a Moleskine for "life notes" (notes of non-work-related
lectures, sermons, and thoughts), just using the small pocket-sized
cahiers for notes in meetings is great. I can walk in without looking
like I'm ready to transcribe the entire session, yet take notes that I
know are not "final" - so I can scratch out, draw arrows, etc. The
final version looks much nicer (since I can plan ahead), and serves as
my permanent record. I use this for my weekly typed report to my boss
and my main internal clients. Having this record makes it so much
easier to product those reports, and the discipline of hand-writing
each encounter gives me right-brain time to work on the issues I'm
trying to solve.

Surfbits

unread,
Oct 13, 2008, 10:21:51 AM10/13/08
to Moleskinerie
I use a wonderful freeware application for both Windows and Mac called
Evernote. (http://www.surfbits.com/?p=1566)

It has the amazing capability of accepting any digital photo and using
it's online OCR capability to read and database all the text on the
photo for searching from your desktop application of Evernote. I take
camera pics of menus and wine labels , anything and once it's in the
Evernote cloud, it's searchable and there on my Mac or my Office
Windows machines for reference and editing. Really a great app, now
it's on the iPhone free too!

Tim Verpoorten
Surfbits.com

Tob...@aol.com

unread,
Oct 13, 2008, 4:50:00 PM10/13/08
to Molesk...@googlegroups.com
     Great advice. I was thinking of the same thing as another way of keeping the different subject matter together.
     Why do you like the Apica CD-15 journals better than the moleskine journals for your work?
 
     Toby
Rather than scan mine, I re-write notes from the pocket cahiers I take
into meetings into a fuller report of the meeting. I write that in an
Apica CD-15 that I use for my work log. I carry the Apica in a leather

Tob...@aol.com

unread,
Oct 13, 2008, 4:54:38 PM10/13/08
to Molesk...@googlegroups.com
     I also thought that if you could afford to buy a small copy machine, that could be another alternative if you don't want to spend time scanning in your journals.
 
     Toby

Smitty

unread,
Oct 14, 2008, 3:53:02 AM10/14/08
to Moleskinerie
The paper is much better with fountain pens. The Moleskine paper gets
worse as the pen nib gets wider. I'm a fan of fine nibs, but some are
wide enough to cause bleed-through. This never has happened with the
Clairfontaine paper in the Apicas. Also, the surface is smooth, almost
polished, rather than rough. The Moliskines are great if you want the
"tooth" for artist media (pencin, pastels, chalk, or thicker inks line
ballpoint or some gels), but for liquid inks, there tends to be if not
actual bleed-through, at least a severe darkening of the page. With
the Apicas, you almost can't tell there is writing on the other side.
The paper just feels more substantial, too.

Smythe

On Oct 13, 4:50 pm, Tob...@aol.com wrote:
> Great advice. I was thinking of the same thing as  another way of keeping the
> different subject matter together.
>      Why do you like the Apica CD-15 journals better  than the moleskine
> journals for your work?
>
>      Toby
>
> Rather  than scan mine, I re-write notes from the pocket cahiers I take
> into  meetings into a fuller report of the meeting. I write that in an
> Apica  CD-15 that I use for my work log. I carry the Apica in a  leather
>
> **************New MapQuest Local shows what's happening at your destination.  
> Dining, Movies, Events, News & more. Try it out
> (http://local.mapquest.com/?ncid=emlcntnew00000002)

Erisraven

unread,
Oct 14, 2008, 1:05:21 PM10/14/08
to Moleskinerie
You're a genius! I've even got an evernote account, but somehow I'd
never connected the idea! <bounces>

Tob...@aol.com

unread,
Oct 14, 2008, 10:59:20 PM10/14/08
to Molesk...@googlegroups.com
     Thanks for the info., Smythe. 'l have to try them some day.
 
     Toby
 
The paper is much better with fountain pens. The Moleskine paper gets
worse as the pen nib gets wider. I'm a fan of fine nibs, but some are
wide enough to cause bleed-through. This never has happened with the
Clairfontaine paper in the Apicas. Also, the surface is smooth, almost
 




New MapQuest Local shows what's happening at your destination. Dining, Movies, Events, News & more. Try it out!
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages