Victorian London

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myoarin

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Oct 19, 2009, 5:52:19 PM10/19/09
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For those with more than a passing interest in Victorian London, this
site should be of interest:
http://www.victorianlondon.org/

Lee Jackson has done a remarkable job of collecting/linking and
writing an immense amount of information. The topics on the left open
more detailed headings. A direct search is opened by clicking on
"main search about me" on the "binding". Entering a term brings up
all texts with the term, apparently all extracts from Victorian
publications.

You can search the "Dictionary of London" by Charles Dickens Jr. (of
course, you knew he wrote one, while his wife was having eight
children in eleven years).

Maybe the site can inspire something on Quezi.

What is/was a "peeler"?

eiffel

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Oct 20, 2009, 6:52:52 AM10/20/09
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> What is/was a "peeler"?

Just taking a wild guess here, that it might be one of Robert Peel's
bobbies?

answerfinder

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Oct 21, 2009, 3:19:00 AM10/21/09
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Myo.
Thanks. I found this site a few years ago, I still pop in occasionally
to have a look.

A policeman's lot is not a happy one.....
http://quezi.com/10161

myoarin

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Oct 21, 2009, 7:44:11 AM10/21/09
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Of course. You two are insiders, especially AF. Did you ever wear
the blue?

The stories, Holmes and crime reports, would let one think there was
once a time when one was within calling distance anywhere in London.

Cheers, Myo

eiffel

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Oct 21, 2009, 10:34:55 AM10/21/09
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> You two are insiders...

I'm not sure what qualifies me as an insider, apart from being
voluntarily exiled in England.

> The stories ... would let one think there was once a
> time when one was within calling distance anywhere in London.

Yes I was struck by question 3351
http://uclue.com/?xq=3351
where the burglary victim, speaking in court, matter-of-factly says "I
pulled him [the burglar] into Drury Lane, and shouted for the police —
a constable came up and took him into custody".

Just like that, huh?

Regards,
Roger

myoarin

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Oct 21, 2009, 11:26:49 AM10/21/09
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Me too, reminded of Doyle's - I believe - writing that cops
signaled for colleague support by knocking their club on the pavement.

Ah, the good old days, when there was a policeman around the nearest
corner and didn't need anything more than a trundgeon.
In the late 1950s, the police in Stockholm still carried swords.

Cheers, Myo



On Oct 21, 4:34 pm, eiffel <roger.bro...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > You two are insiders...
>
> I'm not sure what qualifies me as an insider, apart from being
> voluntarily exiled in England.
>
> > The stories ... would let one think there was once a
> > time when one was within calling distance anywhere in London.
>
> Yes I was struck by question 3351http://uclue.com/?xq=3351

eiffel

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Oct 21, 2009, 4:39:33 PM10/21/09
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A couple of years ago I tried to learn French (I didn't get very far
though). One of the videos I borrowed from the library was made in
France. When the actors flagged down a policeman to ask for
directions, the policeman immediately saluted them, as if to say "I am
your servant". I'd forgotten it was like that.

There was a time when "if you want to know the time, ask a policeman".
I wouldn't try it nowadays though.
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