Google and the Library Model of copyright protection.

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Librarian

unread,
Oct 11, 2006, 7:55:36 AM10/11/06
to DRM, Copyright and Google
In most countries anyone can visit a public library and view a huge
range of copyright material without payment. Many of these Libraries
are working with Google right now.

Google's universal search ambitions would be helped to a considerable
extent by embracing a Reference Library Model of search for copyright
material such as Google Book search where content can be searched and
read but not taken away (or printed, copied, edited).

There are already 100% Google Compatible tools to do that like
AegisDRM's Google DRM add-ins - it is just a question of whether Google
wants to use these implement the model and protect copyright owners
content or use the options of either restricting what searchers can
actually read on-line or simply distributing copyright materials freely
Napster style

Again in countries where anyone can visit a public library most will
prevent readers copying books 100%. Most restrict this in much the same
way that Digital Rights Management does.

I'm sure that some wiseacre types will no doubt tell us that they could
take the books into the restroom and photograph all the pages while
others will take pride in cracking the Library security and sneaking
books out. However the Library Model is a tried and tested one and
already accepted by authors, publishers and readers. Let's see it
implemented on-line now to speed up the process of expanding on-line
knowledge rather than trying for a show-down.

Nicholas

unread,
Oct 15, 2006, 2:47:24 AM10/15/06
to DRM, Copyright and Google
Librarian wrote:

> Google's universal search ambitions would be helped to a considerable
> extent by embracing a Reference Library Model of search for copyright
> material such as Google Book search where content can be searched and
> read but not taken away (or printed, copied, edited).
>
> There are already 100% Google Compatible tools to do that like
> AegisDRM's Google DRM add-ins - it is just a question of whether Google
> wants to use these implement the model and protect copyright owners
> content or use the options of either restricting what searchers can
> actually read on-line or simply distributing copyright materials freely
> Napster style

Good point, a reference library on the Internet would be wonderful and
Google appears to have the will and the means to achieve it.

The problem is that DRM in the form of technical protection measures
won't work as others have argued. For example:

"The only problem is controlling the use of content once it becomes
digital is impossible because digital technologies for encoding,
decoding, storing and transporting content are all about moving bits,
not atoms, and you can't defend bits." [1]

and

"I don't believe that DRM can be successful in keeping widely
distributed content off the filesharing networks." [2]

My response is that we need a different form of Rights Protection [3]
that can protect and reward copyright owners without the need for
costly but handicapped technical protection measures. I believe Google
could develop such a system however, as you say, "it is just a question
of whether Google wants to."

[1] Why DRM will never work, Mark Gibbs,
http://www.networkworld.com/columnists/2002/1014gibbs.html

[2] Why Use DRM If It Doesn't Work?, Ernest Miller,
http://copyfight.corante.com/archives/003559.html

[3] Trading Rights to Digital Content, Nicholas Bentley,
http://www.omidyar.net/group/intellectual-contributions/ws/trading_rights_to_digital_content/

Librarian

unread,
Dec 5, 2006, 4:59:44 PM12/5/06
to DRM, Copyright and Google

Nicholas wrote:

> Librarian wrote:
>
> > Google's universal search ambitions would be helped to a considerable
> > extent by embracing a Reference Library Model of search for copyright
> > material such as Google Book search where content can be searched and
> > read but not taken away (or printed, copied, edited).
> >
>

> Good point, a reference library on the Internet would be wonderful and
> Google appears to have the will and the means to achieve it.
>
> The problem is that DRM in the form of technical protection measures
> won't work as others have argued. For example:
>
> "The only problem is controlling the use of content once it becomes
> digital is impossible because digital technologies for encoding,
> decoding, storing and transporting content are all about moving bits,
> not atoms, and you can't defend bits." [1]
>

The same applies to physical security - a five dollar jemmy can open
your front door in just a few seconds - to add my own quote

"The only problem is protecting matter is impossible because physical
technologies for protecting property, households, people are all about
protecting not atoms, and (five thousnad yearsd of experience shows)
you can't defend atoms."

;o)


> and
>
> "I don't believe that DRM can be successful in keeping widely
> distributed content off the filesharing networks." [2]

That is really simply an argument for not allowing widespread access to
digital content. In that sense because Google is perceived by content
creators and their agents as being untrustworthy to look after their
content Google may in the middle term become restricted to basically an
source of low value and free content. Professonally created material
will be indexed but Google will not be the repository. That will remain
fragmented in proprietor systems.

> My response is that we need a different form of Rights Protection [3]
> that can protect and reward copyright owners without the need for
> costly but handicapped technical protection measures. I believe Google
> could develop such a system however, as you say, "it is just a question
> of whether Google wants to."

They are clever in the way that smart guys well empowered with capital
and resources are - well they've come up with AdWords so far - that's a
far cry from creating a magical system to support creative endeavor and
creation of intellectual property worldwide presumably even when the
property is not on Google.

Authors, publishers, scientific journals all need to see a clear path
to support ongoing professional work. The Napster/Kazaa model is great
for consumers but provides limited incentive to those who don't already
have strong media outlets. Wikis like GPL are great but besides being
generally unreviewed, significant contributions are really restricted
to those who are luck enough to be supported by an institution (or are
students).

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