A modified GTD system

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everettlane

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Jun 19, 2005, 9:27:30 AM6/19/05
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Hi all -- I've written up my mods to the GTD system, including some
adaptations from Martin Ternouth's paper-based system:

http://triptronix.net/ishbadiddle/archives/2005/06/19/01.53.20/

I'm eager for your input. Thanks!

-- Mike

Cameron

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Jun 19, 2005, 10:01:55 AM6/19/05
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If you're going to invoke "Kanban" i'm going to invoke Lean Thinking
and Six Sigma ;o)

Personal opinion follows and i'm no authority.

"I multitask. And when I multitask, I tend to divide my attention,
wander through projects, look up something on the Internet, etc etc
etc."

You've identified that you don't multitask, you distract yourself.
Solution: manufacture a methodology by which you cannot distract
yourself -
there is only one piece of paper on your desk.

However, you currently appear to have a system that means as soon as
you raise your eyeline 3 inches you will see a mass of work.

Not good.

The other work you have around you should be available, but not seen.
By having it visible, it will trigger you to think about it, beg you to
work on it.
If this is how you wish to work things, so be it, i would contend
though that your system should encourage you to think about something
when it is most advantageous to do so.

Avoid the mental rabbit warrens.

Your system seems to decrease one of my key goals in "GTD", Velocity.
Do one thing at a time, but do that -very- fast.
Remove all waste activities around your execution of that task.

You've found that yourself, turn off the monitor - narrow the pipeline,
focus your mental push on one thing and fly it through that pipe. Your
piles of paper will probably become your new "monitor" that you have to
turn off.

"In practice, I actually like having my projects in front of me.
There's something tangible about it that's extremely helpful."

Ask yourself the "5 Whys" as to what possible benefit there is to
having a lot of projects on your desk that -you can do nothing about
right now-. (unless you wish to distract yourself from the task that
you were doing.

And "Hi" to everyone, first post here.

Jared M. Spool

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Jun 19, 2005, 11:22:32 AM6/19/05
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At 10:01 AM 6/19/2005, Cameron wrote:
>Ask yourself the "5 Whys" as to what possible benefit there is to
>having a lot of projects on your desk that -you can do nothing about
>right now-. (unless you wish to distract yourself from the task that
>you were doing.

"5 Whys"?

Jared

Jared M. Spool
User Interface Engineering
http://www.uie.com jsp...@uie.com

UI10 Spotlight Presenter: Flow author Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
See details at http://www.uiconf.com

Cameron

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Jun 19, 2005, 11:41:02 AM6/19/05
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"Asking "Why?" may be a favorite technique of your three year old child
in driving you crazy, but it could teach you a valuable Six Sigma
quality lesson."

http://www.isixsigma.com/library/content/c020610a.asp

everettlane

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Jun 19, 2005, 10:31:34 PM6/19/05
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Cameron -- Thanks so much for your thoughtful input. I think you're
definitely right -- the goal of the system (and I need to re-read "The
Goal," come to think of it) should be to do two things: 1) make the
current task happen faster and better, and 2) make sure that you're
working on the right task at any given time. Or to paraphrase, that
you're doing the thing right, and doing the right thing. In theory, the
GTD system would help me do both. But as I've described, I've had
trouble with implementation. Thus far, this hybrid system seems to help
me deal with my love of piles of paper -- at least the piles are
organized now! But seriously, the whole concept of the "Kanban"
(Ternouth's use is probably not strictly accurate) is to have one
project on your workspace at a time. I find this easier to do in the
physical workspace than the electronic.(My description of multitasking
woes are more about computer desktops rather than real ones.) It's
still a work in progress, and your comments are very helpful.

Bryan Ewbank

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Jun 21, 2005, 12:59:17 PM6/21/05
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I had the same problem with distractions in the electronic desktop. I
find the computer much more productive if I maximize all windows.
Everything is still there (ALT-tab, in Windoze), but you can absorbed
by the *ONLY ONE* visible window. Yeah, even that browser window is
hidden so I can't see what's going on in the groups, mailing lists,
etc. Also, no IM windows for me. Too distracting, and no way to keep
them from popping up.

On 6/19/05, everettlane <evere...@gmail.com> wrote:
> ... I find this easier to do in the

Brian McGroarty

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Jun 22, 2005, 1:27:49 AM6/22/05
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I'm a few days into trying on a Mac. While I've found Mac analogs for
most of my Windows apps already, the lack of maximize and tile are
driving me batty. My normal mode is to have one app full screen, or
two apps balanced on the left and right of my screen.

If there's a hack to tile or quickly maximize apps on the Mac (full
screen, not zoom to fit) I'd be grateful to hear details.

TC

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Jun 22, 2005, 4:33:44 AM6/22/05
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I'll try to give you some tips that may help.

First of all if you only want to see the windows of one application it
is possible to option+cmd click on its dock icon. This will hide all
other applications.
I know this isn't the same as fullscreen but may help you to
concentrate on one app at a time.

When you are using cmd+tab it is also possible to hide and quit
applications from the applications list. If you highlight an
application in the list then you can press h to hide it or q to quit
it.

Finally I would recommend getting into using Expose. If you press the
default key to view all windows of the current application (F10) you
can then press TAB to move through all your visible applications'
windows.

Nik

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Jun 22, 2005, 11:19:55 AM6/22/05
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On Jun 21, 2005, at 11:27 PM, Brian McGroarty wrote:

>
> I'm a few days into trying on a Mac. While I've found Mac analogs for
> most of my Windows apps already, the lack of maximize and tile are
> driving me batty. My normal mode is to have one app full screen, or
> two apps balanced on the left and right of my screen.
>
> If there's a hack to tile or quickly maximize apps on the Mac (full
> screen, not zoom to fit) I'd be grateful to hear details.

Holding the option key while clicking the zoom box should maximize it
to its fullest extent. What that means varies slightly from
application to application, but it's typically equivalent to the
Maximize button on Windows.

--Nik

ajt

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Jun 22, 2005, 6:50:50 PM6/22/05
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> If there's a hack to tile or quickly maximize apps on the Mac (full
> screen, not zoom to fit) I'd be grateful to hear details.

Try the inverse - have a look at AutoHide - it hides (the equivalent of
Apple-H) an app whenever you switch away from it.

everettlane

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Jun 23, 2005, 12:02:23 PM6/23/05
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For Windows users -- if you're working on a single task, hide the task
bar at the bottom. (You can set it to "Auto-Hide" under taskbar & start
menu properties). Not having a string of icons at the bottom of the
screen not only reduces visual clutter, it also discourages you from
switching back and forth to other programs. Remove the temptation! You
can use alt-tab to switch.

Jacques & Tosha Perreault

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Jun 24, 2005, 11:18:42 AM6/24/05
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I like SpiritedAway for auto-hiding. Same kind of thing, but it works
with a timer and uses VERY little resources (unlike it seems,
autohide).

http://www.macupdate.com/spirited

Jacques

Mark Burgess

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Jun 24, 2005, 2:15:18 PM6/24/05
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When you are in the application you'll be using for a while, choose
File>Hide Others (cmd-option-h in most programs). Lots of Mac users
don't even know it exists but I use this command all day long.
--
Mark

Mark Burgess

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Jun 24, 2005, 2:16:07 PM6/24/05
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Whoops, that should be [Application] > Hide Others

eric Farris

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Jun 24, 2005, 3:14:07 PM6/24/05
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On 6/24/05, Mark Burgess <mar...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Whoops, that should be [Application] > Hide Others
>
> On 6/24/05, Mark Burgess <mar...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > When you are in the application you'll be using for a while, choose
> > File>Hide Others (cmd-option-h in most programs). Lots of Mac users
> > don't even know it exists but I use this command all day long.
>

I use Virtual Desktops to organize my apps full-screen, or mostly
full-screen. If you're switching from Windows, that might be kinda
foreign and take some getting used to. I switched from Linux, and it's
a must-have feature for me. I couldn't believe it wasn't built in to
OS X, but Desktop Manager (http://desktopmanager.berlios.de/) is an
excellent free implementation.

--
e

Jeffrey C.Long

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Jun 26, 2005, 4:32:23 PM6/26/05
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I, too, wish I could tile apps. It's the one thing that no one has
mentioned a mac option for. Is there any?

Jeff
http://www.JeffreyCLong.com
http://del.icio.us/new/jeffreyclong
"We tune because we care" - Yonder Mountain String Band

eventualbuddha

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Jun 27, 2005, 12:12:27 PM6/27/05
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