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Re: New Web Site (International Man of Mystery)


Paul D. Fernhout May 1, 2008 3:48 AM
Posted in group: OpenVirgle
Guess we should assume that anything we send you Google and the NSA reads
too. :-) Of course, the NSA reads almost everything anyway. :-)
  http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=NSA+reads+email
That's one reason why you're such an interesting person to write to. :-)

See also:
  "Security and privacy problems w/ web apps (was Re: Pointrel/oscomak...)"
  http://groups.google.com/group/openvirgle/msg/b141a88587bf795d
"Plus you can assume anything you put through Google (or eventually maybe
OSCOMAK) is monitored by the CIA and NSA etc. See:
  "Google = NSA 2.0?"
  http://uneasysilence.com/archive/2006/10/8041/
  "Spooks on board at Google"
  http://www.google-watch.org/jobad.html
And as is likely with with Wikipedia, either directly or by deep packet
analysis, you can expect the government would be looking over your shoulder
when you use a web version of OSCOMAK (privacy in search and use is always a
good reason to download data in big chunks :-). "

Still, remember:
  "Re: IMPORTANT: Copyright issues & GFDL (legal alternatives?)"
  http://groups.google.com/group/openvirgle/msg/5bd385feed4127d7
"""
Our biggest advantage is that no one takes us seriously. :-)

And our second biggest advantage is that our communications are monitored,
which provides a channel by which we can turn enemies into friends. :-)

And our third biggest advantage is we have no assets, and so are not a
profitable target and have nothing serious to fight over amongst ourselves. :-)
"""

And no, I'm not really kidding about all this. :-)

--Paul Fernhout

Bryan Bishop wrote:
> On Wednesday 30 April 2008, Doram wrote:
>> And, I do know about the non-http interfaces available, but I do not
>> have any experience with them. My technology education skipped from
>> DOS pre-internet, over the whole Compuserve/GENIE/etc. through BBS/
>> Usenet early internet thing, and straight into HTTP WWW stuff. All I
>> know about them is in terms of the history of computing. The closest
>> I came was having to use a VAX mainframe in College, and learning how
>> to use telnet to play a MUD RPG.
>
> Google has amazingly awesome documentation on gmail about setting up the
> pop3 and imap accounts and getting a mail client for your computer; I
> find that I couldn't possibly keep up with my email if I had to use the
> HTTP ajaxy interface that gmail comes with by default.