morning "workouts" and food

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morning "workouts" and food djconnel 10/11/12 5:39 AM
Good article from Hammer Nutrition (I can't judge the science, since it's not my area, but Hammer has a fairly good history of providing good advice):


Key point: eating sugary food too close to a high-intensity morning ride can actually contribute to bonking.   This is part of why I have never done well with super-early intensity: I hate going hungry when I wake up.

Dan

Re: morning "workouts" and food thorpej 10/11/12 6:24 AM

On Oct 11, 2012, at 5:39 AM, djconnel <djco...@gmail.com> wrote:

Good article from Hammer Nutrition (I can't judge the science, since it's not my area, but Hammer has a fairly good history of providing good advice):

Haven't read the article, but as I understand it, you eat too much sweet / starch, you get the insulin response that pulls the glucose out of your blood ~immediately, and you then have to wait for the other hormone (forgetting its name ATM) to release the glycogen.

This is why I get up so damn early on days that I ride - so I can eat plenty of time before I roll out.




Key point: eating sugary food too close to a high-intensity morning ride can actually contribute to bonking.   This is part of why I have never done well with super-early intensity: I hate going hungry when I wake up.

Dan


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-- thorpej

Re: morning "workouts" and food amanda 10/11/12 8:14 AM
If it is the insulin response (which is what I thought too... and also haven't read the article), then just make sure your pre-ride meal involves more than just starch/sugar - include some protein and fat, and maybe use more complex carbs instead of simple ones (brown rice; sweet potato). That slows the insulin response, so it doesn't pull all the sugar out of your blood so fast as to cause bonking.
Re: morning "workouts" and food Andy Stadler 10/11/12 8:36 AM
Where does a doppio or macchiato fit into all of this morning meal planning?
Re: morning "workouts" and food Johan Beisser 10/11/12 8:58 AM
Use heavy cream, it'll fit right in.

On Thu, Oct 11, 2012 at 8:36 AM, Andrew Stadler <sta...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Where does a doppio or macchiato fit into all of this morning meal planning?
>
Re: morning "workouts" and food djconnel 10/11/12 9:03 AM
See the doping thread.
Re: morning "workouts" and food Peter Chang 10/11/12 10:31 AM
2012/10/11  <tho...@me.com>:
>
> On Oct 11, 2012, at 5:39 AM, djconnel <djco...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Good article from Hammer Nutrition (I can't judge the science, since it's
> not my area, but Hammer has a fairly good history of providing good advice):
>
>
> Haven't read the article, but as I understand it, you eat too much sweet /
> starch, you get the insulin response that pulls the glucose out of your
> blood ~immediately, and you then have to wait for the other hormone
> (forgetting its name ATM) to release the glycogen.

i think it's the other way, insulin triggers glucose uptake from teh
blood into the muscles/liver/etc. the negative insulin response is
because you've flooded the system w/ glucose which causes a rush of
insulin which triggers faster uptake which means less free glucose/etc
for the muscles/liver/etc.

the complex carb story is that the processing into simple sugars
reduces the initial rush and the feedback loop.

\p
Re: morning "workouts" and food Carlin Eng 10/11/12 3:43 PM
Definitely an interesting read. Thanks Dan!

I recall PfC telling a story awhile back about setting alarms for 4 AM pre-race and scarfing down bowls of rice, then going back to bed.