Top Arthur Murray Teacher

Showing 1-8 of 8 messages
Top Arthur Murray Teacher Joe Way 3/19/99 12:00 AM
Hello, my name is Joe Way, and for 1998, I was the Top Advanced Department
Teacher in the counrty for the Arthur Murray Dance Studios, so why don't I
put in my two cents worth...  There are a few things which have bothered me
in reading these posts.

First, the cost of A.M.'s are off the wall and "charge units to confuse the
real costs."  Of course chains are more expensive (and that includes the
Fred schools too), because for the most part about 10% has to come right off
the top to pay for the name.  [Anyone who has ever ran their own franchised
business of any kind understands that.]  As well, the schools are usually
better kept up as opposed to "rental space" schools where the teacher just
rents by the hour, so there is more overhead to pay for.  Then, there are
more people to pay... the teacher, the owner, the receptionist, and maybe a
supervisor or manager.  So, instead of just money going into the teacher's
pocket, there are a number of people who what over the students' needs.

As well, it sounds to me like a lot of your are upset at schools trying to
make money...  I have to ask you...  In your profession, do you try to make
money?...  Do you want to live well?...

Even though I was the Top Advanced Department Teacher (meaning I trained
mostly advanced students (who b.t.w. always did extremely well in comps A.M.
and Open around the country)), I strongly believed that at no time was I
ever "selling" someone on "how to dance", I show them how much fun dancing
is and can be.  That's what people pay for at any level they want to
achieve.  [I will give you that not all teachers are the greatest and teach
everything as best as could be, but that's true of independents as well.]

Next... "the unit system"...  If there is one thing I feel is great about
the franchises, it's the unit system.  The reason for this is that when
teaching a private lesson, I like to know that the students are going to be
able to get the review and practice of what they have learned.  Along with a
standardized sylabus, my students are able to feel that everyone is learing
to same and there is a sense of "family" at the school for that.  Most AM's
also usually allow - once you are on a Bronze or higher - the students to
come to as many groups and parties as they wish as long as they keep up at
least one private a week, so the student could in effect actually be paying
less than an independent  if say coming to 2 parties and 3 groups.

Also, in regards to how much effect Arthur Murrays have had on social
dancing.  That's really indisputable.  It has been the cornerstone of Social
dancing in the country.  In 1913, Arthur Murray started a mail order company
and sent the famous "pictures of feet" to people who couldn't be in the
center of dancing in New York.  When people needed more steps that needed
instruction, he trained teachers & began opening studios to teach.  Arthur
Murray was the very first franchised anything.  Then with the "Arthur Murray
Dance Party" on T.V. no matter what you danced AM or independent "The Arthur
Murray Way" has become the ONLY way to dance.  Then a bunch of teachers from
AMI wanted to go out on their own, so they paid Fred Astaire for their name
and changed the syllabus a little (copywrite laws) and began teaching. So
there started another influence of the Arthur Murray system.  Even now the
U.S. DanceSport Championships are run by American Ballroom Company which is
headed by the heads of AMI, and of course the Ohio Star Ball started as an
Arthur Murray one day showcase.  The NDCA syllabus is based on the Arthur
Murray syllabus, so even independents are teaching AMI's way.  And now
overseas, AMI's are beginning to pop up everywhere.  Even Marcus and Karen
Hilton are working with AMI, so are Corky and Shirley Ballas, and now
Augusto Schiavo is opening his own AMI's in Italy.

In the end I think that Arthur Murrays have a lot to offer, but you have to
decide for yourselves what is best for your dancing and most importantly,
your own enjoyment.  Now, I know that all of you think that I am so
"pro-AMI" because I work for them, but infact, I am now an Independent going
out on my own.  But I am intellegent enough to know that AMI will always be
part of my dance career, because it is such a strong-hold in both
competitive and social dancing here in America, and I'm sure I'll be back as
an owner in time.

Okay, until I get fired up again...

Bye!

Joe
dance...@ameritech.net

Top Arthur Murray Teacher Kenneth Wetzel 3/19/99 12:00 AM
I agree with much of what Joe Way said. I did the whole 9 Yards with
Arthur Murray in the 50's when there were over 450 Studios Worldwide. I
went through the training program & worked My way up to An eventual
Owner. I therefore know all the Ins & Outs. Arthur Murray put Ballroom
Dancing on the Map. Most everything You see Today is a Reasonable
Facsimile of the Original AM System. He wrote the Book! Fred Astaire,
Veloz & Yolanda & many others that followed were Spin-offs of AM & many
of those lived off of AM's Overflow. His Medal System & 'Louise Taylor'
Junioring Manual were Cornerstones that have been copied but ever
duplicated. Many (If not All) Independent Teachers & Studios follow the
Guidelines that AM created. It is true that some People have used the AM
Name, System & Studio Atmosphere for personal gain but Corruption
happens all the time in many Enterprises. I can only say that the
Standard AM set & the good that was done over many Years far outweighs
any Negative occurences. His prices are not out of line compared to
others but of course It's a matter of Choice. The public has that
choice! It is often the case that people like to knock the Giant
especially when they don't have all the facts. AM was the Giant who may
of created by accident some Monsters but the Joy He brought to so Many
is Priceless.                
                  Kenny Wetzel

Top Arthur Murray Teacher IClast 3/20/99 12:00 AM
"Joe Way" <dance...@ameritech.net> wrote:
> Hello, my name is Joe Way, and for 1998, I was the Top Advanced Department
> Teacher in the counrty for the Arthur Murray Dance Studios

Thank you for your interesting post. Among the historical information you
provided, you did not mention the infamous contracts that often made the news
in the '40s, '50s, and perhaps even the '60s.

I have two questions: Where do you dance? When people ask me where I go to
dance, my answer is "Everywhere there is dancing" meaning studios, ballrooms,
hotels, bars, conventions, clubs, etc. I remember seeing Murray dancers in
public only once in my lifetime of dancing and that was many years ago. The
group's students wouldn't dance with me but the teachers did.

Why, in my travels, have I never been made to feel welcome at a Murray studio
when I showed up for a dance party? In fact, I've hardly gotten beyond the
door and have never attended such a dance party in spite of a great many
attempts.

Icono Clast -- A San Franciscan posting from San Francisco

-----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------
http://www.dejanews.com/       Search, Read, Discuss, or Start Your Own    

Top Arthur Murray Teacher bal...@my-dejanews.com 3/20/99 12:00 AM
In article <7cvpqv$vj1$1...@nnrp1.dejanews.com>,

  IClast <IClast@JPS.net> wrote:
> "Joe Way" <dance...@ameritech.net> wrote:
> > Hello, my name is Joe Way, and for 1998, I was the Top Advanced Department
> > Teacher in the counrty for the Arthur Murray Dance Studios
>
> Thank you for your interesting post. Among the historical information you
> provided, you did not mention the infamous contracts that often made the news
> in the '40s, '50s, and perhaps even the '60s.
>
> I have two questions: Where do you dance? When people ask me where I go to
> dance, my answer is "Everywhere there is dancing" meaning studios, ballrooms,
> hotels, bars, conventions, clubs, etc. I remember seeing Murray dancers in
> public only once in my lifetime of dancing and that was many years ago. The
> group's students wouldn't dance with me but the teachers did.
In Los Angeles we see the Arthur Murray dancers out everytime they need to
"recruit" new students.This Happens about once or twice a year.They always go
out as a group and after a dance or two they just sit and watch all night.
Top Arthur Murray Teacher Bill Brusilow 3/22/99 12:00 AM
Just my two cents in support of Arthur Murray.  I took lessons from
Arthur Murray for 4 years, at least one private lesson per week -
sometimes up to 6 lessons/month. I competed in the local A.M.
competitions and travelled to a couple of larger comps - Northcoast in
Cleveland and Ohio Star Ball. I got through Full Bronze in 3 years, but
decided to stay at that level for an additional year.  Competed pro-am
at Ohio in 96 (all  firsts (out of seven competitors) in men's full
bronze rhumba, cha-cha, swing, mambo, samba, and hustle), then stopped
dancing to spend my free time on other things - specifically -  getting
married, which has now led to fatherhood (of twins!).  Needless to say,
my priorities are significantly different now than they were when I was
dancing.  

I don't regret a single minute of those lessons or a single penny spent
on them.  I probably averaged about $5000/year in dance-associated
expenses, and it was money well spent.  I enjoyed the lessons, the
instructors, the environment, the competition - everything.   Many many
people spend over $20K on a car, and at the end of 4 years they have a
4-year-old car that they're looking to get rid of.  After 4 years I had
spent a little over $20K and had dance skills that I will keep for the
rest of my life, not to mention lots of fun memories.   On the expense
continuum of hobbies, A.M. is expensive, but not unique.  Plenty of
people have hobbies that cost them thousands of dollars every year -
country clubs and yacht clubs can easily cost $5K or more per year.
People who race cars, or boats, or yachts, or horses can also easily
spend that kind of money, as can hobbyists who raise and show dogs or
other animals.  The list of hobbies that can cost the enthusiast
thousands of dollars per year is not particularly short.  At A.M. I
received private instruction that averaged about $75-80/hour.  Well,
that is well-within that range of what private lessons from a
professional cost, regardless of whether one takes dance lessons, golf
lessons, ski lessons, or what-have-you lessons. Why would anyone expect
private lessons to be cheap?  For A.M. or other dance studios to charge
what they charge for private lessons is not crazy, or evil, or even
unexpected.

As for whether one can get a better deal at independent studios - I
think that, having danced in this area for 4 years, and (admittedly
UNLIKE most A.M. students) having danced at a lot of different venues,
including many many open parties at several independent studios, I could
probably find good instruction outside of the A.M. chain - but it would
be from instructors who I knew had been A.M. instructors before becoming
independents.   And, I will say, that having seen a good cross-section
of dance students in this area, that the A.M. students are, on the
average, noticeably better dancers than students at independent studios,
and much better dancers than students who take group lessons almost
exclusively. {Except of course when we are talking about hustle, which
A.M. most distinctly does NOT know how to teach}.

It is clear that the cost of A.M. lessons surprises or even shocks many
people.  Well that's fine - they can take group lessons or inexpensive
private lessons if they can find them.  After all, we are talking about
dancing here, not flight instruction. Like the aforementioned
activities of golf and skiing, one's satisfaction is almost completely
self-judged (outside of competition).  A crappy dancer can still have a
wonderful time dancing, given enough patient and benevolent partners.
But like any activity or hobby, some people have an urge to improve and
excel that can be met only by a combination of  professional instruction
and regimented practice, and that is not going to be cheap.  Those who
don't want to pay a lot for dance lessons should recognize this other
side of the argument, and it is this other side that A.M. can satisfy.

Top Arthur Murray Teacher dan edwards 3/25/99 12:00 AM

Joe Way wrote in message ...

[snip]


> As well, the schools are usually
>better kept up as opposed to "rental space" schools where the teacher just
>rents by the hour, so there is more overhead to pay for.

In my part of the woods the private dance studios are very nice (and top
quality) - its the AM studio that is in a shabbier building.

>Also, in regards to how much effect Arthur Murrays have had on social
>dancing.  That's really indisputable.  It has been the cornerstone of
Social
>dancing in the country.

Hmm, perhaps of what is called "American Style" ballroom I'd agree with you,
but there has been lots of social dancing not related to AM.

>Then with the "Arthur Murray
>Dance Party" on T.V. no matter what you danced AM or independent "The
Arthur
>Murray Way" has become the ONLY way to dance.  Then a bunch of teachers
from
>AMI wanted to go out on their own, so they paid Fred Astaire for their name
>and changed the syllabus a little (copywrite laws) and began teaching. So
>there started another influence of the Arthur Murray system.  Even now the
>U.S. DanceSport Championships are run by American Ballroom Company which is
>headed by the heads of AMI, and of course the Ohio Star Ball started as an
>Arthur Murray one day showcase.  The NDCA syllabus is based on the Arthur
>Murray syllabus, so even independents are teaching AMI's way.  And now
>overseas, AMI's are beginning to pop up everywhere.  Even Marcus and Karen
>Hilton are working with AMI, so are Corky and Shirley Ballas, and now
>Augusto Schiavo is opening his own AMI's in Italy.

American marketing know-how!  But these countries are notoriously
socialistic so it is no wonder that the local champs needed someone to show
them how business is done.

But not dancing.  Given your above paragraph crediting AMI for dancing in
the US, can we also assume that the AMI "way" has kept americans from
becoming world champs (or even hardly ever being finalists!)  The best
teachers I know have not come from the AMI way.

> [snip] because it is such a strong-hold in both


>competitive and social dancing here in America,

Which I think is sad.  I  hope that the competitive scene becomes more
neutral (in many ways).  I doubt that social dancing is influenced very much
anymore (or, shall we say, with anything new) from AMI.

-dan
straw...@worldnet.att.net


Top Arthur Murray Teacher Balrmdansa 3/29/99 12:00 AM
It's the same philosophy as a health club.  If you show up once to a health
club, they may let you try it for free, but only once.  Why should an AM studio
let you use their business for free?  In MA, the independent studios that hold
parties also charge for entrance to those parties.  

If you are in the MA area and would like to dance with some wonderful AM
students, I would suggest going to a "Saturday Night Out" Dance PArty held at
an Independent Ballet studio, DNE school of dance in Chelmsford - there is a
4000 sq. ft. PArque floor for ballroom purposes.

Louise Taylor Junioring Method robert...@gmail.com 8/11/13 3:09 PM
I am looking for a copy of the Louise Taylor Junioring Method ... I see that no posts have been made here for quite awhile but I thought I would give it a try ... to be clear, I am assuming that only an Arthur Murray instructor would have this item.

Thank you

Robert