Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method?

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Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Teresa 4/28/12 11:23 AM
Hi All,
 
I am looking into the laser method of declawing cats.  Not sure how I feel about the whole declawing issue, but would like to find our if someone has tried this and if so would you recomend it?
 
If so, I am looking for recommendations for a veterinarian.  It appears that much of the benefit of this procedure can be nullfied it it's not done by someone skilled and practiced in it.
 
 
 
Thanks for any info.
 
Teresa Bradford
Eastland Ave.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Re: [East Nashville] Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? nangran 4/28/12 12:23 PM
To declaw a cat is the same as cutting off the first part of your finger to the knuckle.No matter how you do it,it's mutilation. It affects the cat's personality and leaves it unable to defend itself

--- On Sat, 4/28/12, ter...@eastlandliving.com <ter...@eastlandliving.com> wrote:

From: ter...@eastlandliving.com <ter...@eastlandliving.com>
Subject: [East Nashville] Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method?
To: "East Nashville" <east-na...@googlegroups.com>
Date: Saturday, April 28, 2012, 1:23 PM

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RE: [East Nashville] Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Teresa 4/28/12 1:30 PM
I realize it's a sensative issue,  and I am not trying to enter into the debate.   I am hoping to hear from someone with personal experience with the laser procedure and how it turned out for them  and their pets (good or bad).
 
I do appreciate any feedback to that end.  Please respond offline if you want.
 
Thanks!
 
 
 
-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [East Nashville] Has anyone had a cat declawed using the
laser method?
Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? mbremner 4/28/12 2:27 PM
I would love some more info on this , we are looking at our for or two
kittens, but want it done right. Let me know what you find out...

On Apr 28, 3:30 pm, <ter...@eastlandliving.com> wrote:
> I realize it's a sensative issue,  and I am not trying to enter into the debate.   I am hoping to hear from someone with personal experience with the laser procedure and how it turned out for them  and their pets (good or bad).
>
>
>
> I do appreciate any feedback to that end.  Please respond offline if you want.
>
>
>
> Thanks!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Re: [East Nashville] Has anyone had a cat declawed using the
> laser method?
> From: nangran <nan...@bellsouth.net>
> Date: Sat, April 28, 2012 2:23 pm
> To: East Nashville <east-na...@googlegroups.com>,teresa@eastlandliving.comTo declaw a cat is the same as cutting off the first part of your finger to theknuckle.Nomatter how you do it,it's mutilation. It affects the cat's personality and leaves it unable to defend itself
> --- OnSat, 4/28/12,ter...@eastlandliving.com<ter...@eastlandliving.com>wrote:
> From:...@eastlandliving.com<ter...@eastlandliving.com>
> Subject: [East Nashville] Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method?
> To: "East Nashville" <east-na...@googlegroups.com>
> Date: Saturday, April 28, 2012, 1:23 PMHi All,
>
>
>
> I am looking into the laser method of declawing cats.  Not sure how I feel about the whole declawing issue, but would like to find our if someone has tried this and if so would you recomend it?
>
>
>
> If so, I am looking for recommendations for a veterinarian.  It appears that much of the benefit of this procedure can be nullfied it it's not done by someone skilled and practiced in it.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Thanks for any info.
>
>
>
> Teresa Bradford
>
> Eastland Ave.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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Re: [East Nashville] Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Alyce Dobyns 4/28/12 2:36 PM
I too am interested. I understand the procedure and will need to
recover a couch and chair. It is unfortunate although the kids have
not minded.



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Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? eastsidemomma 4/28/12 2:55 PM
I ended up with a stray kitten my mom found and didn't have the heart
to tell my daughter no.
I was pregnant at the time and the cat scratched my belly really bad,
it left a scar. I was not willing to risk that happening to my 4 year
old or the baby once it was born. I had been against this but at the
time it was this or get rid of him. We did the procedure at Murphy Rd
Hospital. They were great. We had him microchipped and neutered at the
same time. They put a pain patch on his neck which was better for him.
It was over $700 for all of it but he healed quickly and was still
wild and sweet and playful....nothing changed. He loved to play chase
with our dog and snuggle up with us both. I would not however done
this if I had know how desperate he was to get outside. No matter how
hard we tried he got out, weekly. I never wanted him to be an outdoor
cat here bc of the stray dogs and cars etc.
Go talk to a vet. Get the details. I really recommend Murphy rd for
this. Good luck, it's a tough decision
On Apr 28, 4:36 pm, Alyce Dobyns <alyce.dob...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I too am interested. I understand the procedure and will need to
> recover a couch and chair. It is unfortunate although the kids have
> not minded.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Apr 28, 2012, at 4:28 PM, mbremner <megbrem...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > I would love some more info on this , we are looking at our for or two
> > kittens, but want it done right. Let me know what you find out...
>
> > On Apr 28, 3:30 pm, <ter...@eastlandliving.com> wrote:
> >> I realize it's a sensative issue,  and I am not trying to enter into the debate.   I am hoping to hear from someone with personal experience with the laser procedure and how it turned out for them  and their pets (good or bad).
>
> >> I do appreciate any feedback to that end.  Please respond offline if you want.
>
> >> Thanks!
>
> >> -------- Original Message --------
> >> Subject: Re: [East Nashville] Has anyone had a cat declawed using the
> >> laser method?
> >> From: nangran <nang...@bellsouth.net>
> >> Date: Sat, April 28, 2012 2:23 pm
> >> To: East Nashville <east-na...@googlegroups.com>,ter...@eastlandliving.comTo declaw a cat is the same as cutting off the first part of your finger to theknuckle.Nomatter how you do it,it's mutilation. It affects the cat's personality and leaves it unable to defend itself
> >> --- OnSat, 4/28/12,ter...@eastlandliving.com<ter...@eastlandliving.com>wrote:
> >> From:ter...@eastlandliving.com<ter...@eastlandliving.com>
Re: [East Nashville] Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Cecilia Tosh 4/28/12 3:38 PM
It's been several years since I had my cats declawed but I can tell you that even tho there are pros & cons on this issue I believe my cats turned out pretty good. They are completely indoor cats so there has never been a need to defend themselves...however...they still have back claws so they can use those if the need ever did arise.
 
Oh...and ALL of my cats that I've had except for 2 have been declawed & ALL of them were always very loving. No personality changes before or after. I would do it again if I had to but it would make a lot of people mad if they knew about it.:) happy

From: Masterson momma <hmast...@watkins.edu>
To: East Nashville <east-na...@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2012 4:55 PM
Subject: [East Nashville] Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method?
> >> To unsubscribe from this group, send email toeast-nashville+unsub...@googlegroups.com.

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Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Pug Lady 4/29/12 7:02 AM

having cats declawed in any fashion is torture for the cat.  they may
say it's Less Painful" for the cat, but how do they know that, it's
amputation no matter how you look at it.  if you want to save
furniture, buy the nail tips for the cats that is sold in the stores.
it also leaves cats defenseless should they need to defend
themselves.  don't declaw, it's torture.
Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? freelancewriter 4/29/12 11:22 AM
I usually don't comment on these posts but I have to say my thoughts
here. Declawing a cat is absolute cruelty and animal abuse. If you
have to declaw a cat you shouldn't own one. Learn how to clip it's
nails and do it regularly, every few weeks to manage. Get a scratching
post in each room and let it be. If your furniture is more important
to you than the cat, find a home for the cat. Is is agonizing beyond
anything you can comprehend and many times goes wrong and cats feet
become infected causing crippling and sometimes additional need for
amputation of the foot. Don't let anyone bullsh*t you into believing
it's safe, painless and will be OK. It's not. There is never an excuse
to torture an animal for any reason. If you don't want a cat to
scratch you or your kids, don't get a cat. Even dogs will scratch. It
takes care and work to have an animal and is just as easy to clip it's
nails. If you start when they are young, they are easy to train and
get used to it, allowing you to handle them. Otherwise you may need
someone to help hold the kitty while you do it. My two cents and I
know I've been harsh. I don't care. I love and adore cats and advocate
for them and treat them and have no patience or time for people who
abuse them.

On Apr 28, 2:23 pm, <ter...@eastlandliving.com> wrote:
Re: [East Nashville] Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Sarah 4/29/12 11:28 AM
For veterinary practices, when we are faced with the option of a cat being homeless or being declawed, we are always going to choose declawing.  Most practitioners strongly advise and council owners of adult cats to try any and all methods of prevention before settling on declawing as a last resort.  The reasons are:
1.  And adult cat weighs anywhere from 8 - 19 lbs, and this is a difficult weight to bear on toes healing from surgery.  It delays healing time, can cause bleeding through the excision sites or reopen the wounds entirely.
2.  This extra weight to bear makes recovery very painful for the cat. This delays recovery and can cause the site to become infected from the cat's self-ministrations.
3.  The adult cat must re-learn how to walk and bear weight on its toes where previously it had a bone joint and claw on which to weight-bear for running, jumping, landing, etc.  This is difficult for the cat, can be painful and can delay recovery.
4.  An adult cat's litter box use can be affected by the secondary implications of declaw surgery, that is, the pain in their toes when walking, aggravated by the impact of pawing litter and/or the sides of the litter box.  If the adult cat associates the pain with the litter box, it will usually stop using the litter box.  Since you must also use paper litter for 3 - 4 weeks following adult cat declaw surgery, the change in litter type may also alter your cat's litter box usage.  

Basically, adult cats are old dogs that, much like adult people, are categorically opposed to learning new tricks.  Introducing a painful change in their physical state and in their comfort zone of litter box usage is a good way to indelibly alter your relationship with the cat and can also catalyze a stressful chain reaction that results in a idiosyncratic cystitis or a full-blown urinary tract infection.  For adult male cats, this is a fatal condition that will cause death in 24 - 48 hrs.  For adult female cats, this can become a chronic condition which will result in much more costly and unsanitary damage to your household that her claws ever would have.  (i.e., she will urinate and defecate henceforth in open closets, living room corners and on bathroom rugs and your children's toybox.)

Declawing an adult feline should only be an absolute last resort.  It's not healthy for the cat or the owner.  And you will find that most vets will not consent to do the surgery, for the same reasons that they do not dock tails nor crop ears anymore on dogs.  There is just no need for it.   

Declawing a kitten is an entirely different matter.
We are still going to advise you 6 ways to Sunday on why you don't need to declaw your kitten, because there is usually no need for it.  There are so many well-made and well-engineered cat toys, trees, scratching posts and preventive measures such as Soft Paws and Catnip play pads that your kitten, if properly stimulated and redirected by these products, should NEVER want to claw your furniture, rugs, carpeting or stair post.  I speak from experience, having raised 6 cats, all rescues, from weaning bottle to adulthood.  I have all leather furniture, including my headboard.  I have area rugs.  Not once have my cats even attempted to clench and release on such tempting surfaces.  They find it much more satisfying to tear up corrugated cardboard scratching pads and kick toys.  Also, I TRIM THEIR CLAWS EVERY 3 WEEKS.  

Nail trims are crucial for cats of all ages, those who live indoors.  Cats scratch to shed the outer sheaths on their continuously growing nails, and to deposit from their scent glands.  If you keep their nails trimmed, they don't NEED to pull off the sheath on their nails.  This means their scratch is less functional and more about communication.  Even my declawed rescue kitties get on the scratch pads and ham it up - it's not about the claws, it's about their stinky toes.  Cats are weird, ok? Not vengefully destructive.  Most people can't trim their own pets' claws - and that's ok, your local veterinary staff can.  Visiting the vet's office every 3 - 4 weeks is good for your cats, it socializes them with the staff, which will come in VERY handy when you have to get your sick or injured cat in there for emergency treatment.  (Same goes for dogs, fyi.  Nail trims, they're good for all.)

SHOULD YOU FIND SOME VERY ODD BUT MEDICALLY COMPELLING REASON THAT YOU HAVE TO HAVE YOUR KITTEN DECLAWED:

Laser or radio surgery is the way it HAS TO BE DONE.  While there are some very talented vets and surgeons who can still use a blade, most will not because there are better methods.  Both laser and radio cauterize as they incise, helping the  surgery site to heal faster, with less inflammation, which = less pain, swelling and possibility of infection.  This is much better for the kitty, and much better for you.  This surgery should always be done with pre-anesthetic bloodwork to check clotting factors and chemistry panels to ensure the cat is a good candidate for the surgery and for metabolizing the post-op pain prevention that MUST BE GIVEN.  Your cat should be receiving an anti-inflammatory and an opiate or barbituate derivative for pain upon recovery from the anesthesia, and in 6 hr doses for 48 hours following surgery at home with you.  Any veterinary clinic that either doesn't offer this or gives you the option to decide if you want to pay for it - WALK OUT.  That is not where you want your pets.  

Your kitten will usually be declawed at the same time as its neutering surgery.  This is to minimize risk from anesthesia and because your kitten, at 4 - 6 months, still only weighs about 2 - 4 lbs and has not yet fully realized its walking and balance potential since it's only just discovered its tail is for balance, not a chew toy.  Your very light-on-its-feet kitten will have a much easier, i.e. faster and less painful, recovery from the surgery and will not have to re-learn ambulatory functions, which makes your kitten much less stressed than an adult would be.  Litterbox use will most likely remain unchanged, mostly because your kitten will find the paper litter to be a delightful new toy to paw around and spread out every which way.  Kittens, much like children and unlike adults, don't see change as anything but normal in their environment, and they don't have the wherewithall to be resentful of it.  

Declawed cats are at a disadvantage against predators and other cats; if your cats are declawed, they should NOT be going outside.  They cannot climb, they cannot secure food nearly as effectively, and they cannot defend themselves adequately.  

There is NEVER ANY REASON to have any cat declawed on all 4 feet.  You should not be able to find any veterinarian that will do that surgery, whatsoever.  If you do, they should be reported to the TVMA ethics board. The same goes for any vet who offers to sever the cats' tendons and ligaments so they can no longer retract or flex their claws.  

Kitten or adult, 9 times out of 10 there is not really going to be a good reason to get your cat declawed.  Life happens, though, and an elderly relative or young child will be at risk on the off chance they are scratched, and you have to make the decision.  This is why vets have pursued the more expensive but better methods of laser and radio surgery.  It is definitely going to cost you more.  It is definitely the right thing to do if you absolutely have no other choice and have to have it done.  

Buying $10K worth of new furniture and then deciding you have to get your cat declawed is a shoddy and unethical reason for cutting off your cats toes.  If you have cats, or want to have cats, understand the consequences and be responsible with the decision.  Veterinarians do not do convenience cosmetic surgeries because someone decided to update their living room decor.  

Best of luck with your decision - if I can answer any other questions, contact me off list.


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Re: [East Nashville] Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? tattooedgroomer 4/29/12 12:48 PM
My mother had 2 cats...both of which were FIV Positive, thus indoor only cats.  I had to move back home with her after giving birth to my daughter since I was newly divorced and needed help caring for a small child.  The cats and my daughter coexisted fine until my daughter reached the age where she was crawling and walking.  My mom's female cat instinctly knew (like most animals) that my daughter was a baby and when my daughter reached up to grab her, my mom's female cat would swat at her, not using her claws.  My mother's male cat, on the other hand, ALWAYS kept his claws out when swatting at her, and even got her on the face a couple of times.  Now, you all know as well as I do that once a child starts to become mobile, it's not always easy to keep a constant eye on them..we as parents do the absolute best that we can.  Most of the time, we were able to prevent her and the male cat from interacting.  On a few occasions, however, it was not prevented.  We tried clipping his nails on a regular basis, but after the 2nd or 3rd time, he got downright aggressive with us and a trip to the vet every other week wasn't always possible.  We even tried those Soft Paws things, but because of his personality, we had to have him sedated in order to put them on, but in 2 days time, he had chewed them off again.  The only plausible thing we could do was to declaw his front claws to prevent any further injuries to my baby daughter.  It sucked, but it had to be done.  He never scratched up furniture as he had scratching posts and used them often.  It was to prevent physical harm to my baby.  Every situation is different.  While I don't agree with the declawing of a cat for aesthetic purposes (i.e. scratching the furniture, carpet, etc), if it is a situation such as my mother's I have to agree, as long as every other option has been exhausted.
Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Betty 4/30/12 6:27 AM
Mutalation, pure and simple.  Perhaps you should consider another type
of pet.

On Apr 29, 2:48 pm, Tiffany Latham <mm.sweet.surren...@gmail.com>
wrote:
> ...
>
> read more »
Re: [East Nashville] Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Family email 4/30/12 7:16 AM
Everybody loves lasers and cats!
http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/laser-cats/2925

On Apr 30, 2012, at 8:27 AM, Betty Collins <be...@bookfool.com> wrote:

> Mutalation, pure and simple.  Perhaps you should consider another type
> of pet.
>
> On Apr 29, 2:48 pm, Tiffany Latham <mm.sweet.surren...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>> My mother had 2 cats...both of which were FIV Positive, thus indoor only
>> cats.  I had to move back home with her after giving birth to my daughter
>> since I was newly divorced and needed help caring for a small child.  The
>> cats and my daughter coexisted fine until my daughter reached the age where
>> she was crawling and walking.  My mom's female cat instinctly knew (like
>> most animals) that my daughter was a baby and when my daughter reached up
>> to grab her, my mom's female cat would swat at her, not using her claws.
>> My mother's male cat, on the other hand, ALWAYS kept his claws out when
>> swatting at her, and even got her on the face a couple of times.  Now, you
>> all know as well as I do that once a child starts to become mobile, it's
>> not always easy to keep a constant eye on them..we as parents do the
>> absolute best that we can.  Most of the time, we were able to prevent her
>> and the male cat from interacting.  On a few occasions, however, it was not
>> prevented.  We tried clipping his nails on a regular basis, but after the
>> 2nd or 3rd time, he got downright aggressive with us and a trip to the vet
>> every other week wasn't always possible.  We even tried those Soft Paws
>> things, but because of his personality, we had to have him sedated in order
>> to put them on, but in 2 days time, he had chewed them off again.  The only
>> plausible thing we could do was to declaw his front claws to prevent any
>> further injuries to my baby daughter.  It sucked, but it had to be done..
Re: [East Nashville] Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Dirty Hairy 4/30/12 7:18 AM
Just curious. If it's mutilation & cruelty, why do the vets perform the operation?
Why doesn't the SPCA do something about it?

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 30, 2012, at 8:27 AM, Betty Collins <be...@bookfool.com> wrote:

Re: [East Nashville] Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? Rembrandt Von 4/30/12 7:37 AM
Seems like laser would be the least cruel other then the cat being defenseless if it happened to end up outside. They make very good sprays to stop or reduce cats clawing the furniture.


On Monday, April 30, 2012, Harold wrote:
Just curious. If it's mutilation & cruelty, why do the vets perform the operation?
Why doesn't the SPCA do something about it?

Sent from my iPhone



--
B Hayes [8^)
615-669-5296

Re: [East Nashville] Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method? James Damato 4/30/12 9:21 PM
A nice way to sidestep the issue is to adopt a cat that has already been declawed, as I have done.  Petfinder even allows you to search for declawed cats.  Granted, it doesn't help the original poster, or others who already have an intact cat.

I once asked a PetSmart employee if they ever had declawed cats in their adoption section.  She told me that it was not right to do so, and that adopting a declawed cat only increased the demand for more declawed cats.  I stopped short of telling her that she was a moron -- I didn't think she'd be able to understand.

Self-righteousness is it's own reward!


-----Original Message-----
From: freelancewriter <sacredspac...@gmail.com>
To: East Nashville <east-na...@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Sun, Apr 29, 2012 1:22 pm
Subject: [East Nashville] Re: Has anyone had a cat declawed using the laser method?

> wrote:
> Hi All,
>
>
>
> I am looking into the laser method of declawing cats.  Not sure how I feel 
about the whole declawing issue, but would like to find our if someone has tried 
this and if so would you recomend it?
>
>
>
> If so, I am looking for recommendations for a veterinarian.  It appears that 
much of the benefit of this procedure can be nullfied it it's not done by 
someone skilled and practiced in it.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Thanks for any info.
>
>
>
> Teresa Bradford
>
> Eastland Ave.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

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