Home DNA isolation - youtube video

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Home DNA isolation - youtube video Randy 3/3/12 2:57 PM
I haven't tried it, although the video is fun to watch.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaaRrR-ZHP4
Re: [DIYbio] Home DNA isolation - youtube video phillyj 3/3/12 3:39 PM
Honestly, is this really DNA extraction or something else. Is it
because of the structure of human DNA (vs plasmid DNA) that its so
easy to do this? When I extract plasmid DNA in isopropanol, we spin it
at 6000rcf for 50 minutes at 4C (or if you got faster centrifuge, less
time).

On Sat, Mar 3, 2012 at 5:57 PM, Randy <beb...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I haven't tried it, although the video is fun to watch.
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaaRrR-ZHP4
>
> --
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Re: Home DNA isolation - youtube video Ethan 3/3/12 3:50 PM
This is really DNA extraction, though there is probably a significant
amount of other detritus mixed in with it. If you include a protease
in the procedure, that should yield more pure DNA. Human chromosomal
DNA (assuming it is in tact) ranges from about 50-300 megabase pairs.
Plasmid DNA tops out somewhere around 30 kilobase pairs, so there is
significantly larger pieces of DNA in eukaryotic cells than plasmid
DNA in prokaryotes. The size of the pieces also affect how quickly
they would settle under centrifugation.

DNA extraction from fruit is a pretty popular demonstration
experiment. I have a little jar of cavendish banana (Musa acuminata
AAA) DNA that I keep on my desk. The yield of DNA from bananas was
surprisingly high, which I think may be a result of triploidy of the
particular strain.

On Mar 3, 6:39 pm, Jeswin <phillyj...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Honestly, is this really DNA extraction or something else. Is it
> because of the structure of human DNA (vs plasmid DNA) that its so
> easy to do this? When I extract plasmid DNA in isopropanol, we spin it
> at 6000rcf for 50 minutes at 4C (or if you got faster centrifuge, less
> time).
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Re: [DIYbio] Home DNA isolation - youtube video Nathan McCorkle 3/3/12 8:01 PM
I did something like this in my first bio lab here at RIT. We used
proteinase K, then did a quick ethanol extraction, and PCR-ed our
mitochondrial hypervariable region, which was then sent across town to
the genomics core for sequencing. It was really easy, and lots of fun!

I've seen strawberries done too, I'm surprised that genspace doesn't
have a video of that on youtube. This one is pretty explanatory:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOpu4iN5Bh4

On Sat, Mar 3, 2012 at 5:57 PM, Randy <beb...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I haven't tried it, although the video is fun to watch.
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaaRrR-ZHP4
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "DIYbio" group.
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/msg/diybio/-/5gsH9W1XCn8J.
> To post to this group, send email to diy...@googlegroups.com.
> To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
> diybio+un...@googlegroups.com.
> For more options, visit this group at
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--
Nathan McCorkle
Rochester Institute of Technology
College of Science, Biotechnology/Bioinformatics

Re: Home DNA isolation - youtube video Patrik D'haeseleer 3/3/12 9:59 PM
We do this all the time with BioCurious for science faire demos. We
just have people collect a vial of spit, then add some salt, a drop of
detergent, and pour rubbing alcohol on top. Because you start with a
much more concentrated sample, the result is a lot more impressive
than what they showed in the video. No need for any food coloring
either.

Here's a nice picture from our booth at the East Bay Mini Maker Faire:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/68942898@N05/6271400055/in/pool-1760807@N24/

On Mar 3, 8:01 pm, Nathan McCorkle <nmz...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I did something like this in my first bio lab here at RIT. We used
> proteinase K, then did a quick ethanol extraction, and PCR-ed our
> mitochondrial hypervariable region, which was then sent across town to
> the genomics core for sequencing. It was really easy, and lots of fun!
>
> I've seen strawberries done too, I'm surprised that genspace doesn't
> have a video of that on youtube. This one is pretty explanatory:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOpu4iN5Bh4
>
Re: Home DNA isolation - youtube video Jonathan Cline 5/5/12 12:34 PM

On Saturday, March 3, 2012 2:57:11 PM UTC-8, Randy wrote:
I haven't tried it, although the video is fun to watch.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaaRrR-ZHP4

More on spit and DNA ; spit itself contains DNA, not necessary to get cheek cells, from the PGP:

Spit Our Way


 ""Here are a couple of fun facts about saliva that most people (including most scientists) don’t know: most saliva is loaded with DNA, and the primary source of that DNA is blood cells. This has been shown by genotyping people with bone marrow transplants (1). The genotype of blood and saliva from transplant recipients is typically more similar to the genotype of the marrow donor than the pre-transplant genotype of the recipient (the genotype of the non-hematopoietic cells of the recipient is retained). This amazing discovery also demonstrates interesting and practical things about saliva biology, including that most DNA in it does not come from cheek or other epithelial cells. So, when we send you a collection kit there is no need to swab or abrade cheeks (or to make awful choking sounds). Just salivate and spit."" -- Preston Estep, PhD is the Director of Gerontology and leads the saliva collection effort at the Personal Genome Project at Harvard Medical School.


## Jonathan Cline
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