Re: Uuencoding (AKA UUE) history?

Showing 1-7 of 7 messages
Re: Uuencoding (AKA UUE) history? Ivan Shmakov 3/20/13 11:01 AM
>>>>> Richard Kettlewell <r...@greenend.org.uk> writes:
>>>>> Ivan Shmakov <onei...@gmail.com> writes:

        [Cross-posting to news:comp.mail.uucp and dropping
        news:comp.misc from Followup-To:, for obvious reasons.]

 >> I wonder if someone could comment on the Uuencoding (UUE) origins
 >> and history?

 > The oldest uuencode.c I have is in 4.0BSD and is timestamped October
 > 1980.  The corresponding man page mentions 6/1/80 in the .TH field
 > (which probably means June, going by other files in the same
 > directory) and credits Mark Horton as the program's author.

        ACK, thanks!

        Strangely enough, there's one more [1] timestamped 1983, yet
        claimed to belong to 2.9BSD.  Any idea why it may be like that?

[1] http://minnie.tuhs.org/cgi-bin/utree.pl?file=2.9BSD/usr/src/cmd/uucp/uuencode.c

[...]

 >> Also, is the documentation for the "historic" UUCP packages
 >> (Version 7 Unix' one? HDB?) available somewhere on the Web?  I guess
 >> it could shed some light on the UUE origins.  (As, as per the
 >> Wikipedia article, UUE was designed to allow for binary transfer
 >> over UUCP links.)

 > You can find V7 at: http://minnie.tuhs.org/cgi-bin/utree.pl?file=V7 -
 > it includes UUCP but not AFAICS uuencode.

        Indeed, I've checked that one not so long after posting.

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Re: Uuencoding (AKA UUE) history? Ivan Shmakov 3/20/13 11:34 AM
>>>>> Ivan Shmakov <onei...@gmail.com> writes:
>>>>> Richard Kettlewell <r...@greenend.org.uk> writes:

[...]

 >> The oldest uuencode.c I have is in 4.0BSD and is timestamped October
 >> 1980.  The corresponding man page mentions 6/1/80 in the .TH field
 >> (which probably means June, going by other files in the same
 >> directory) and credits Mark Horton as the program's author.

 > ACK, thanks!

 > Strangely enough, there's one more [1] timestamped 1983, yet claimed
 > to belong to 2.9BSD.

        The diff, however, contains only a single insignificant change:

--- 4BSD/usr/src/cmd/uuencode.c
+++ 2.9BSD/usr/src/cmd/uucp/uuencode.c
@@ -1,4 +1,7 @@
-static char *sccsid = "@(#)uuencode.c   4.1 (Berkeley) 10/1/80";
+#ifndef lint
+static char sccsid[] = "@(#)uuencode.c  5.1 (Berkeley) 7/2/83";
+#endif
+
 /*
  * uuencode [input] output
  *

        But I still wonder if there're any earlier versions of this code
        yet to be found.

 > Any idea why it may be like that?

        Well, nevermind, I've got it: 2.9BSD was an update for the 2BSD
        line, which incorporated changes first made for the 4BSD line.

--cut: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BSD --
    Later releases of 2BSD contained ports of changes to the VAX-based
    releases of BSD back to the PDP-11 architecture.  2.9BSD from 1983
    included code from 4.1cBSD, and was the first release that was a
    full OS (a modified Version 7 Unix) rather than a set of
    applications and patches.  [...]
--cut: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BSD --

 > [1] http://minnie.tuhs.org/cgi-bin/utree.pl?file=2.9BSD/usr/src/cmd/uucp/uuencode.c

[...]
Re: Uuencoding (AKA UUE) history? Richard Kettlewell 3/21/13 7:29 AM
Ivan Shmakov <onei...@gmail.com> writes:
>>>>>> Richard Kettlewell <r...@greenend.org.uk> writes:
>>>>>> Ivan Shmakov <onei...@gmail.com> writes:
>
>         [Cross-posting to news:comp.mail.uucp and dropping
>         news:comp.misc from Followup-To:, for obvious reasons.]
>
>  >> I wonder if someone could comment on the Uuencoding (UUE) origins
>  >> and history?
>
>  > The oldest uuencode.c I have is in 4.0BSD and is timestamped October
>  > 1980.  The corresponding man page mentions 6/1/80 in the .TH field
>  > (which probably means June, going by other files in the same
>  > directory) and credits Mark Horton as the program's author.
>
>         ACK, thanks!
>
>         Strangely enough, there's one more [1] timestamped 1983, yet
>         claimed to belong to 2.9BSD.  Any idea why it may be like that?

I was once confused by that.  I think the answer turned out to be that
2.x and 4.x are separate lines of development rather than strict
ancestor/descendants.  I don’t know the history well though.

--
http://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/
Re: Uuencoding (AKA UUE) history? Ivan Shmakov 3/21/13 8:52 AM
>>>>> John Levine <jo...@iecc.com> writes:

        [Cross-posting to news:comp.mail.uucp and dropping
        news:comp.misc from Followup-To:, for obvious reasons.]

 >> Also, is the documentation for the "historic" UUCP packages (Version
 >> 7 Unix' one? HDB?) available somewhere on the Web?  I guess it could
 >> shed some light on the UUE origins.  (As, as per the Wikipedia
 >> article, UUE was designed to allow for binary transfer over UUCP
 >> links.)

 > Actually, uucp could transfer arbitrary binary files just fine, and
 > it was quite common to transfer compressed tarballs of news or mail.

        Well, it wasn't all that long ago that I ran a couple of UUCP
        links myself.  And although virtually the only implementation
        I'm familiar with is Taylor UUCP, I guess that they all indeed
        allowed for binary transfer.

 > What uuencode let you do was to send a binary file disguised as a
 > mail message, which let you send it via multi-hop uucp routes to
 > people on hosts to which you didn't have a direct connection.

        Which matches the use of Base64 and quoted-printable encodings
        to work-around the non-guaranteed 8-bit-cleanness of SMTP links.

        As it seems, there's indeed some confusion between "UUCP" and
        "UUCP-based mail service," much like the one between, say,
        "Base64" (or "quoted-printable") and "MIME," or, occasionally,
        between "Internet" and "World Wide Web..."

 > My recollection is that it showed up pretty soon after we started
 > using uucp, which would have been in about 1979.

        ACK, thanks!

        Also in line with that is that, as Richard Kettlewell has just
        pointed out, 4BSD had uuencode.c [1], timestamped "October,
        1980."  (And unless there be objections, I'm going to add a
        pointer to it on the Wikipedia article.)

        I still wonder if there's some sort of changelog back from these
        days to state "BSD version X.Y.  Added uuencode."  Or something
        like that.

[1] http://minnie.tuhs.org/cgi-bin/utree.pl?file=4BSD/usr/src/cmd/uuencode.c
Re: Uuencoding (AKA UUE) history? John Levine 3/21/13 10:02 AM
>I was once confused by that.  I think the answer turned out to be that
>2.x and 4.x are separate lines of development rather than strict
>ancestor/descendants.  I don’t know the history well though.

2.x was for the PDP-11, 4.x was for the Vax and eventually other 32
bit machines.  The 2.x and 4.x version numbers had nothing to do with
each other.

--
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Re: Uuencoding (AKA UUE) history? Shmuel Metz 3/22/13 6:24 AM
In <871ub8u...@araminta.anjou.terraraq.org.uk>, on 03/21/2013
   at 02:29 PM, Richard Kettlewell <r...@greenend.org.uk> said:

>I was once confused by that.  I think the answer turned out to be
>that 2.x and 4.x are separate lines of development rather than
>strict ancestor/descendants.

My recollection is that 2bsd is DEC PDP-11 and 4bsd is DEC VAX-11;
different lines, although the VAX does have similar instructions and a
compatibility mode.

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Re: Uuencoding (AKA UUE) history? jmfbahciv 3/22/13 7:39 AM
Those were the years when copyrights in sources started to become
legally important.  Whenever we (DEC) did a new ship, we updated
each source file with the new year and version; otherwise some
people might interpret the untouched file as being in the public
domain.

/BAH