Who Moved My App? VMware’s “Cheese-Aware” Application Management

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Who Moved My App? VMware’s “Cheese-Aware” Application Management Kimberly Lambert 7/30/12 7:15 AM

Today, VMware’s head of the application management products group, Shahar Erez, published a post that boils down to 5 key requirements that application management tools will need to follow to embrace the new norm: change. In his post, [Who Moved My App? VMware’s “Cheese-Aware” Application Management], Erez cites the following 5 requirements and we’d love to hear your thoughts on how important these are:

  1. Simplify how changes are applied to applications.  When change is necessary, the application should make every effort to create repeatable processes to apply the change. This includes creating reusable application blueprints for provisioning applications with Application Director, empowering application teams to deploy on their own while satisfying IT’s needs to enforce standards and policies, integrating with continuous build systems, and delivering powerful visualizations that make it easy to execute and communicate changes.
  2. Streamline how IT keeps up with change. Building the intelligence into our management tools so they automatically keep up with change, and minimize human involvement helps to ensure applications stay under management. It also speeds mean-time-to-resolution (MTTR) because all changes are tracked for easy root cause analysis when necessary. For monitoring tools like APM and Hyperic, this takes auto-discovery past just identifying new software that comes online and incorporates tracking if the component moved, powered off, or if additional components of that type came online that your application is using to scale up.
  3.  Accelerate how quickly we understand how any change impacts performance.  It is important for today’s monitoring tools to have the intelligence built in to automatically know what is normal. APM creates baselines and knows how the application performs under load and at the various times of day so it can accurately report when performance is not normal. Further, once it registers as not normal, all the information on transaction, code, and middleware infrastructure performance is correlated so users can easily identify the change that started the performance problem.
  4. Make it easy to understand how users are experiencing application performance.  It is an important mindshift to look at performance in an application-centric manner. Many applications are built to be horizontally scalable, so if a single component starts to degrade, it may not severely affect application performance. APM triangulates real-time samples of transaction times, application middleware and infrastructure monitoring metrics and code performance together to give application owners the right perspective on real user experience.   
  5. Ensure it is open and extensible to encourage, not hinder, innovative applications. We do not anticipate innovation and change to slow down. And we definitely do not want to stand in its way. We never want to force application architects to choose certain appstacks or deployment plans because it is the only way to keep it under management. We have built Application Director with the ability to deploy any app on any cloud. Users are not restricted by language or cloud. APM is optimized for java and VMware vFabric components, but it automatically can trace transactions running across your entire virtual infrastructure and with Hyperic embedded it ships automatically detecting and starting best practice monitoring for over 80 different technologies. And while both APM and Application Director come with a prepopulated catalog of supported technologies, they both are extensible so custom and yet-to-be invented technologies can be incorporated into application management easily. 

The Full Article Can be Read Here: http://bit.ly/Pc1huZ

Re: [ Cloud Computing ] Who Moved My App? VMware’s “Cheese-Aware” Application Management Jim Houghton 7/30/12 1:50 PM
I'm curious - is it now ok to spam the group with corporate marketing material?  If so please unsubscribe me, I get enough content-free mail as it is. 

Jim

(sent from my iPad - sorry for typos!)
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Re: [ Cloud Computing ] Who Moved My App? VMware’s “Cheese-Aware” Application Management Khazret Sapenov 7/30/12 4:52 PM
Your message below has even less content.
Modification of delivery options is a self-service.

KS
Re: [ Cloud Computing ] Who Moved My App? VMware’s “Cheese-Aware” Application Management Jim Houghton 7/30/12 5:23 PM
Not the point - if we allow the group to devolve into unsolicited marketing spams it will quickly lose relevance and followers. Candidly I have nothing against VMW and in fact strongly support several of its products like APM.  However, it's not ok to randomly spam several thousand people without any semblance of responding to a request. 

Jim

(sent from my iPad - sorry for typos!)
Re: [ Cloud Computing ] Who Moved My App? VMware’s “Cheese-Aware” Application Management info 7/30/12 5:49 PM
see below inline

On Mon, Jul 30, 2012 at 8:23 PM, Jim Houghton <jrhou...@yahoo.com> wrote:
Not the point - if we allow the group to devolve into unsolicited marketing spams it will quickly lose relevance and followers. Candidly I have nothing against VMW and in fact strongly support several of its products like APM.  

Labeling it as spam without addressing his points and making assumptions on relevance and the future possibilities
indeed contributes to devolution of discussion. 

 
However, it's not ok to randomly spam several thousand people without any semblance of responding to a request. 

If you read the original post, they are asking for a feedback:
" Erez cites the following 5 requirements and we’d love to hear your thoughts on how important these are: [snip]

Re: [ Cloud Computing ] Who Moved My App? VMware’s “Cheese-Aware” Application Management Stacey 7/31/12 8:30 AM
Hi all,

I will confess Kim and I do freelance product marketing and research for VMware. We put a couple links to the products, but really only to give context. Probably should have changed the title of the post to Feedback requested. Our blogs don't seem to get much conversation and we're trying to validate requirements. So we were asking for your feedback, and did put that call out in the first two sentences. 

I do get that this is a loftier conversation than normal for this group, but we're interested in your sentiments on the topic just the same. 

Cheers,
-Stacey