Cosmic Schmuck Rock Star

Showing 1-5 of 5 messages
Cosmic Schmuck Rock Star Bhavani 4/10/12 5:19 PM
http://www.npr.org/2012/03/16/148778665/bruce-springsteens-sxsw-2012-keynote-speech?ft=3&f=114113159&sc=nl&cc=mn-20120319

This links to Bruce Springsteen's South by Southwest keynote speech.
I wasn't planning to check it out but a friend recommended it and I
was quite pleasantly surprised.  He's talking about music but often
relating it to a bigger picture it seems.  The reason I'm posting it
here has to do with Bruce invoking his version of the Cosmic Schmuck
Principle right near the end.  He hints at it early on but then really
does it later.  Thought it quite refreshing to see a rock star take
that attitude.  It seems a little slow getting going, around 10
minutes is where it got really interesting for me.  Around 11:30 he
talks about the "transformative self" - quite interesting that he
makes this overt connection.  Also became extremely interesting for me
at 36: with a personal coincidence when he started talking about Dylan
and quoted what to me is Dylan's most salient lyric regarding the
transformative self.  Lots more good stuff and the end definitely
worth getting to.  I found the time by listening in 3 or 4 segments.
Re: Cosmic Schmuck Rock Star willems 4/12/12 11:11 AM
On Apr 10, 5:19 pm, Bhavani <ozfrit...@gmail.com> wrote:
> http://www.npr.org/2012/03/16/148778665/bruce-springsteens-sxsw-2012-...
>
> This links to Bruce Springsteen's South by Southwest keynote speech.
> I wasn't planning to check it out but a friend recommended it and I
> was quite pleasantly surprised.  He's talking about music but often
> relating it to a bigger picture it seems.  The reason I'm posting it
> here has to do with Bruce invoking his version of the Cosmic Schmuck
> Principle right near the end.  He hints at it early on but then really
> does it later.  Thought it quite refreshing to see a rock star take
> that attitude.  It seems a little slow getting going, around 10
> minutes is where it got really interesting for me.  Around 11:30 he
> talks about the "transformative self" - quite interesting that he
> makes this overt connection.  Also became extremely interesting for me
> at 36: with a personal coincidence when he started talking about Dylan
> and quoted what to me is Dylan's most salient lyric regarding the
> transformative self.  Lots more good stuff and the end definitely
> worth getting to.  I found the time by listening in 3 or 4 segments.

That's cool Bhavani , after reading one of your posts I had an
interesting coincidence of catching a reference to Alister Crowley in
an Elliot Smith song ;"Speed Trials"
"He's pleased to meet you underneath the horse ,in the cathedral
windows stained black,
He's singing sweet high notes that echo back ,to kill the master."
Re: Cosmic Schmuck Rock Star Bhavani 4/14/12 10:14 PM
Ah, the good ole demon Crowley myth ... how quaint
Re: Cosmic Schmuck Rock Star Psmith 4/17/12 4:38 PM
I wonder what the Pynch thinks of Crowley.  The real Uncle Al eludes
me.  He prefigures Leary and Wilson in so many ways.  His self-
aggrandizement in the Confessions turns me off, but he has certainly
greatly influenced how I see the world.
Re: Cosmic Schmuck Rock Star Bhavani 4/19/12 12:48 PM
On Apr 17, 4:38 pm, Psmith <Ewagner...@aol.com> wrote:
> I wonder what the Pynch thinks of Crowley.

I've not noticed any references to AC the person in Against the Day
but posted earlier about a couple of things that seem to refer to his
work.  Over the years I've learned how to decipher the system of
Qabalah (his spelling) he helped standardize to where I can read it
like a blind person reading braille, I know others can also, and it
seems that Pynch deliberately uses this imagery at times.  So, I don't
have any idea what he thinks of Crowley but it appears he appreciates
some of his work enough to put it in his writing.

>The real Uncle Al eludes
> me. His self-aggrandizement in the Confessions turns me off,

I enjoyed studying the Confessions in RAW's online Crowley course.  We
discovered that he wrote it not long after he started getting vilified
in the English tabloids as the Wickedest Man in the World etc
receiving a barrage of inaccurate bad press for his unconventional
lifestyle and experiments in consciousness.  It also seems that he
hoped the Confessions would brand him as a World Teacher/guru/anti-
guru in hopes of generating a steady income stream which he became
sorely in need of.  In other words, he attempted to market himself and
his work with the Confessions.  He once wrote a letter to Jane Wolfe,
one of his students who lived with him in Sicily years before for
several months saying that she never saw the real AC because he always
wore masks which he felt required to do as part of his obligation as
her teacher.  That recalls a story another engineer told me about Bob
Dylan.  He told me that he once asked Dylan what his plans were for
the summer.  At the end of Dylan's answer, Bob said "then I think I'll
do the Santana/Dylan west coast tour.  My colleague said, " but you
are Bob Dylan?!" "No, no, no, " sez Dylan, " I'm not THAT Bob Dylan."