accessible search and the future of google labs

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accessible search and the future of google labs Naomi Black 8/10/11 12:25 PM
Hi all,

We are updating our web pages and help content to reflect this information, but I wanted to send a note out right away. Many people have been asking about the future of Accessible Search, since our approach to Google Labs is changing. 

With Google's decision to shutter labs.google.com, new launches and experiments in the field of accessibility will appear within our main product sites. As part of this change, we won't be promoting Accessible Search on its own, and instead we'll be focusing our efforts on making sure the main Google.com site works well for all our users. If you really love Accessible Search and want to keep using it, you'll still be able to, it will just be moved to a different page.

Please read on for some of the history behind Accessible Search and how this change affects people who have been using it. We hope this helps answer your questions!

Naomi Black
Google Accessibility

---

Accessible Search And Google Labs

In July 2006, we launched a small search experiment call Accessible Search — the goal was to identify and promote pages that implemented good accessibility techniques. Since that launch, accessibility on the Web has come a long way, with modern browsers and screenreaders providing increased support for highly interactive Web applications via W3C ARIA. At the same time, usage on Accessible Search has dropped, with users prefering to use the main Google.com site for their searches.

What This Means Going Forward:

  • The AccessibleViews experiment on http://www.google.com/experimental will remain, providing keyboard access to search. This experiment also lets you toggle on AccessibleSearch by pressing "Cap A".
  • AccessibleSearch used in the above still measures accessibility as seen in 2006, this will therefore be mostly of interest to users looking for simple, non-interactive search results.
  • AccessibleSearch will continue to be available at this URL: Accessible Search CSE. It uses the Google Custom Search Engine (CSE) framework and will be kept running for the foreseeable future, though we do not plan to update the classifier used in measuring accessibility.
In summary, Accessible Search on Labs was a useful experiment that is now superseded by our current cross-Google accessibility efforts as documented on http://www.google.com/accessibility
Re: accessible search and the future of google labs brian gafff (Line One) 8/10/11 10:07 PM
A lot of blind people in the UK have this page set as their home page. i do
hope that Google sees fit to keep the current page as an alias on any new
incarnation. its far less fiddly than having to turn off instant and or get
a google account and set up prefs every time one wants to do a search. To
me, what is really desperately needed is a stripped down very basic search
without so much clutter and without the tendency to shove loads of video
results to the fore.
 a simple to use, non clever page where blind people can get what they want,
and not have to wade through loads of special options before the results.

 brian
Brian Gaff  bglists@blueyonder.co.uk- If you need to email me please send it
to
bri...@blueyonder.co.uk
Making sure the name 'Brian Gaff' is in the display name field.
Failure to do this may result in delays or message loss.

Some sacrifices are a fact of life in our junk mail  riddled world!


----- Original Message -----
From: "Naomi Black" <nao...@google.com>
To: <acces...@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2011 8:25 PM
Subject: accessible search and the future of google labs


Hi all,

We are updating our web pages and help content to reflect this information,
but I wanted to send a note out right away. Many people have been asking
about the future of Accessible Search, since our approach to Google Labs is
changing.

With Google's decision to shutter labs.google.com, new launches and
experiments in the field of accessibility will appear within our main
product sites. As part of this change, we won't be promoting Accessible
Search on its own, and instead we'll be focusing our efforts on making sure
the main Google.com site works well for all our users. If you really love
Accessible Search and want to keep using it, you'll still be able to, it
will just be moved to a different page.

Please read on for some of the history behind Accessible Search and how this
change affects people who have been using it. We hope this helps answer your
questions!

Naomi Black
Google Accessibility

---

Accessible Search And Google LabsIn July 2006, we launched a small search
experiment call Accessible Search � the goal was to identify and promote


pages that implemented good accessibility techniques. Since that launch,
accessibility on the Web has come a long way, with modern browsers and
screenreaders providing increased support for highly interactive Web
applications via W3C ARIA. At the same time, usage on Accessible Search has
dropped, with users prefering to use the main Google.com site for their
searches.

What This Means Going Forward:

   - The AccessibleViews experiment on
http://www.google.com/experimentalwill remain, providing keyboard access to

search. This experiment also lets
   you toggle on AccessibleSearch by pressing "Cap A".
   - AccessibleSearch used in the above still measures accessibility as seen

   in 2006, this will therefore be mostly of interest to users looking for
   simple, non-interactive search results.
   - AccessibleSearch will continue to be available at this URL: Accessible
   Search
CSE<http://www.google.com/cse?cx=000183394137052953072%3Azc1orsc6mbq>.

   It uses the Google Custom Search Engine (CSE) framework and will be kept
   running for the foreseeable future, though we do not plan to update the
   classifier used in measuring accessibility.

In summary, Accessible Search on Labs was a useful experiment that is now
superseded by our current cross-Google accessibility efforts as documented
on http://www.google.com/accessibility

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Re: accessible search and the future of google labs brian gafff (Line One) 8/10/11 10:09 PM
Incidentally I never di manage to navigate the survey  linked from
accessible search, for a survey for access it was not very accessible was
it!

 Brian
Brian Gaff  bglists@blueyonder.co.uk- If you need to email me please send it
to
bri...@blueyonder.co.uk
Making sure the name 'Brian Gaff' is in the display name field.
Failure to do this may result in delays or message loss.

Some sacrifices are a fact of life in our junk mail  riddled world!
----- Original Message -----
From: "Naomi Black" <nao...@google.com>
To: <acces...@googlegroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2011 8:25 PM
Subject: accessible search and the future of google labs


Hi all,

We are updating our web pages and help content to reflect this information,
but I wanted to send a note out right away. Many people have been asking
about the future of Accessible Search, since our approach to Google Labs is
changing.

With Google's decision to shutter labs.google.com, new launches and
experiments in the field of accessibility will appear within our main
product sites. As part of this change, we won't be promoting Accessible
Search on its own, and instead we'll be focusing our efforts on making sure
the main Google.com site works well for all our users. If you really love
Accessible Search and want to keep using it, you'll still be able to, it
will just be moved to a different page.

Please read on for some of the history behind Accessible Search and how this
change affects people who have been using it. We hope this helps answer your
questions!

Naomi Black
Google Accessibility

---

Accessible Search And Google LabsIn July 2006, we launched a small search
experiment call Accessible Search � the goal was to identify and promote


pages that implemented good accessibility techniques. Since that launch,
accessibility on the Web has come a long way, with modern browsers and
screenreaders providing increased support for highly interactive Web
applications via W3C ARIA. At the same time, usage on Accessible Search has
dropped, with users prefering to use the main Google.com site for their
searches.

What This Means Going Forward:

   - The AccessibleViews experiment on
http://www.google.com/experimentalwill remain, providing keyboard access to

search. This experiment also lets
   you toggle on AccessibleSearch by pressing "Cap A".
   - AccessibleSearch used in the above still measures accessibility as seen

   in 2006, this will therefore be mostly of interest to users looking for
   simple, non-interactive search results.
   - AccessibleSearch will continue to be available at this URL: Accessible
   Search
CSE<http://www.google.com/cse?cx=000183394137052953072%3Azc1orsc6mbq>.

   It uses the Google Custom Search Engine (CSE) framework and will be kept
   running for the foreseeable future, though we do not plan to update the
   classifier used in measuring accessibility.

In summary, Accessible Search on Labs was a useful experiment that is now
superseded by our current cross-Google accessibility efforts as documented
on http://www.google.com/accessibility

--

You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
"accessible" group.
To view this discussion on the web visit
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/accessible/-/MDM1rf6SCnQJ.
To post to this group, send email to acces...@googlegroups.com.
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
accessible+...@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit this group at
http://groups.google.com/group/accessible?hl=en.


Re: accessible search and the future of google labs Katty Geltmeyer 8/11/11 12:06 AM
I agree, Brian! I also set the accessible search page as my home page , and I agree with what you said.
 
Best, Katty
----- Oorspronkelijk bericht -----
Verzonden: donderdag 11 augustus 2011 7:07
Onderwerp: Re: accessible search and the future of google labs

A lot of blind people in the UK have this page set as their home page. i do
hope that Google sees fit to keep the current page as an alias on any new
incarnation. its far less fiddly than having to turn off instant and or get
a google account and set up prefs every time one wants to do a search. To
me, what is really desperately needed is a stripped down very basic search
without so much clutter and without the tendency to shove loads of video
results to the fore.
 a simple to use, non clever page where blind people can get what they want,
and not have to wade through loads of special options before the results.

 brian
Brian Gaff  bgl...@blueyonder.co.uk- If you need to email me please send it
experiment call Accessible Search — the goal was to identify and promote
Re: accessible search and the future of google labs Javier DelaCamara 2/26/13 11:18 AM
HI Everyone,

I found a issue with google search. Maybe there is a work around but it would be great if this could be addressed. When google generated a custom search bar for my site it seems that when I scanned for accessibility that the google button that says search does not have a "alt" tag. This will read as a accessibility error. If there is a fix please email me. All web images must have "alt" tags to comply.

Thanks, Javier
Re: accessible search and the future of google labs Joyce Tikalsky 11/1/13 8:09 AM
I'm interested in a graceful fix or workaround, too. When we use accessibility auditing tools to check our search results page, the CSE logo generates a violation for missing alt text.

Thanks.