The Shared Sign Language of Martha’s Vineyard | Stuff You Missed in History Class: The Podcast

12 views
Skip to first unread message

James Craig

unread,
Apr 13, 2016, 8:54:59 PM4/13/16
to accessib...@knowbility.org

Great podcast episode. Link below. Here's an excerpt from the transcript:

Under the social model, disability is reframed as a social construct that ultimately marginalizes and oppresses people. Simplistically, if an individual is socially marginalized due to a perceived impairment or are unable to physically navigate a space because of a lack of access, they then become, quote, ‘disabled’. In this way, it is not the impairment that has limited their choices and opportunities, but a given society’s reaction to their impairment. 

As to the episode suggestion, I’d like to suggest the history of deaf individuals on Martha’s Vineyard as studied by Nora Groce in Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language: Hereditary Deafness on Martha’s VineyardIt is an outstanding example of inclusion and acceptance in an otherwise pretty bleak history of disability. Historically, Martha’s Vineyard was a relatively isolated island with a high rate of people who were deaf and, uniquely, the hearing individuals all learned sign language to include their deaf community members instead of excluding them. This allowed people who were deaf to be full-fledged participants in the community, because they did not face any significant language barrier. 

I have found that when explaining the idea that disability is a social construct to people, I’m often met with a fair amount of skepticism. I like to use the example of Martha’s Vineyard to show how the social model of disability works in actual practice: when society removes barriers, individuals do not become disabled, as they otherwise would, by perceived impairments.

Sharron Rush

unread,
Apr 14, 2016, 11:04:13 AM4/14/16
to AccessibilitySIG
Great video, thanks for sending James!

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Accessibility_SIG" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to accessibility_...@knowbility.org.
To post to this group, send email to accessib...@knowbility.org.
Visit this group at https://groups.google.com/a/knowbility.org/group/accessibility_sig/.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/a/knowbility.org/d/optout.



--
Sharron Rush | Executive Director | Knowbility.org | @knowbility
Equal access to technology for people with disabilities

Jayne Schurick

unread,
Apr 14, 2016, 11:11:05 AM4/14/16
to accessib...@knowbility.org
I know it’s probably not your thing but Dancing with the Stars this season has a guy who’s been completely deaf since birth, multi-generational deaf family…pretty inspiring (plus he’s gorgeous!!!)

Elle

unread,
Apr 15, 2016, 8:27:25 AM4/15/16
to accessib...@knowbility.org
What a great suggestion - thanks, James! And Jayne, will check that out, too. :)

My understanding of social constructs in the last two years has been largely reformed , so I'm eager to dive into this podcast and learn more.

All the best,
Elle

Glenda Sims

unread,
May 13, 2016, 5:52:12 PM5/13/16
to accessib...@knowbility.org
I recently watched this YouTube video called "Social Model Animation".  I love it! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9s3NZaLhcc4

Happy Friday Y'all,
G

W3C Design Principles:  Web for All.  Web on Everything.
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages